Knowledge is power, 9 documentaries about the history and black culture in America

Knowledge is power, 9 documentaries about the history and black culture in America

Giulia Pacciardi · 1 year ago · Art

As those who have been following us since 2010, the year in which our curatorial work related to art in many of its forms began, are well aware, every time we thought it was necessary we urged to take a position.
We did so by showing you the works of artists whose battles, political opinions and criticism we share.

Our aim has always been to inform and today more than ever we feel this urgency.
To do so we decided to entrust this task to 9 documentaries and interviews that illustrate the powerful history of black culture in America and the concept of “white privilege”, hoping to contribute with our research to the understanding and fight of phenomena that are difficult to digest.

Eyes on the Prize  (1987-1990)

Eyes on the Prize is an American television series and 14-part documentary about the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. The documentary originally aired on the PBS network and it also aired in the United Kingdom on BBC2. Created and executive produced by Henry Hampton at the film production company Blackside and narrated by Julian Bond, the series uses archival footage, stills and interviews by participants and opponents of the movement. The title of the series is derived from the title of the folk song “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize,” which is used as the opening theme music in each episode.
A total of 14 episodes of Eyes on the Prize were produced in two separate parts. The first part, Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954–1965 and the second part, Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965–1985.

Watch all the episodes here.

Freedom Riders (2010)
THREATENED. ATTACKED. JAILED. COULD YOU GET ON THE BUS?

Freedom Riders is the powerful harrowing and ultimately inspirational story of six months in 1961 that changed America forever. From May until November 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives—and many endured savage beatings and imprisonment—for simply traveling together on buses and trains as they journeyed through the Deep South. Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws in order to test and challenge a segregated interstate travel system, the Freedom Riders met with bitter racism and mob violence along the way, sorely testing their belief in nonviolent activism.
From award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson (Wounded Knee, Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple, The Murder of Emmett Till) Freedom Riders features testimony from a fascinating cast of central characters: the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials, and journalists who witnessed the Rides firsthand. The two-hour documentary is based on Raymond Arsenault’s book Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice.

The Black Power Mixtape 1967 – 1975 (2011)

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 mobilizes a treasure trove of 16mm material shot by Swedish journalists who came to the US drawn by stories of urban unrest and revolution. Gaining access to many of the leaders of the Black Power Movement-Stokely Carmichael, Bobby Seale, Angela Davis and Eldridge Cleaver among them-the filmmakers captured them in intimate moments and remarkably unguarded interviews. Thirty years later, this lush collection was found languishing in the basement of Swedish Television. Director Göran Olsson and co-producer Danny Glover bring this footage to light in a mosaic of images, music and narration chronicling the evolution one of our nation’s most indelible turning points, the Black Power movement. Music by Questlove and Om’Mas Keith, and commentary from prominent African- American artists and activists who were influenced by the struggle — including Erykah Badu, Harry Belafonte, Talib Kweli, and Melvin Van Peebles — give the historical footage a fresh, contemporary resonance and makes the film an exhilarating, unprecedented account of an American revolution.

Hidden Colors (2011)

Hidden Colors is the name of an ongoing documentary filmseries directed by Tariq Nasheed and produced through King Flex Entertainment, to explain and describe the marginalizing of African Americans in America and the world. The first four films were funded by separate Kickstarter campaigns, and the fifth film was funded using Indiegogo.

Watch all the episodes here.
Hidden Colors: The Untold History Of People Of Aboriginal, Moor, and African Descent
Hidden Colors 2: The Triumph of Melanin
Hidden Colors 3: The Rules of Racism

Hidden Colors 4: The Religion of White Supremacy
Hidden Colors 5: The Art of Black Warfare

Dark Girls (2011)

Dark Girls is a fascinating and controversial documentary film that goes underneath the surface to explore the prejudices that dark-skinned women face throughout the world. It explores the roots of classism, racism and the lack of self-esteem within a segment of cultures that span from America to the most remote corners of the globe. Women share their personal stories, touching on deeply ingrained beliefs and attitudes of society, while allowing generations to heal as they learn to love themselves for who they are.

White Like Me (2013)

White Like Me, based on the work of acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, explores race and racism in the U.S. through the lens of whiteness and white privilege. In a stunning reassessment of the American ideal of meritocracy and claims that we’ve entered a post-racial society, Wise offers a fascinating look back at the race-based white entitlement programs that built the American middle class, and argues that our failure as a society to come to terms with this legacy of white privilege continues to perpetuate racial inequality and race-driven political resentments today.

13TH – XIII Emendamento (2016)

The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis.

Oprah Interviews The Exonerated Five (2019)

Oprah Winfrey sits down with the exonerated men behind “When They See Us” to discuss the ongoing cycles of racism and injustice in our country, and the need for change.

Hello, Privilege. It’s Me, Chelsea (2019)

The pleasure is all Chelsea’s. “Hello, Privilege. It’s Me, Chelsea” follows comedian Chelsea Handler as she confronts and explores her personal and cultural impacts around white privilege. Handler travels around the country speaking with a wide range of people on the topic of race including fellow comedians Kevin Hart, Tiffany Haddish, and W. Kamau Bell, anti-racism writer and activist Tim Wise, a Republican women’s group in Orange County, CA, college students at an open mic night, and her former high school boyfriend in New Jersey.

Cover photo credit: Black Lives Matter protest in New York City, July 10, 2016. Benedict Evans/Redux

Knowledge is power, 9 documentaries about the history and black culture in America
Art
Knowledge is power, 9 documentaries about the history and black culture in America
Knowledge is power, 9 documentaries about the history and black culture in America
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The sensual and analogue photography of Chantal Convertini

The sensual and analogue photography of Chantal Convertini

Giulia Guido · 2 days ago · Photography

We were immediately captivated by the beauty of Chantal Convertini‘s shots. 

Sensual, delicate and intimate. 

Chantal Convertini is a 28-year-old girl who approached photography almost by chance and only later decided to turn this great passion into a job. Like many other photographers, the first approach she had with photography was through digital. Then, later, four years ago, she also approached the world of analog. This led Chantal Convertini to know how to juggle the two techniques very well, preferring analog for her personal projects. 

The protagonists of her shots are two, the light and the bodies of young women. 

The light is almost always natural, which lightens the interiors of houses and bedrooms slightly. Sometimes her photographs are illuminated by just a few rays of sunshine that penetrates between the slits of closed shutters and blinds. These rays rest on the naked bodies and faces of her subjects, often female, as in the series A feminine view on femininity, in which Chantal Convertini gives her personal vision of the female universe. 

Often, however, she puts herself in front of the lens, creating fantastic selfportraits, intimate and personal. 

Below you can find a selection of her shots, to find out more go to her website, her Instagram profile and her Patreon profile, where you can also support her financially.  

The sensual and analogue photography of Chantal Convertini
Photography
The sensual and analogue photography of Chantal Convertini
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Contemporary photography comes to Bologna with PhMuseum Days

Contemporary photography comes to Bologna with PhMuseum Days

Giulia Guido · 1 day ago · Photography

PhMuseum was founded in 2012 as the first online museum dedicated to contemporary photography with the aim of offering a space accessible to everyone from everywhere that would promote visual culture. Over the years PhMuseum has organised various activities and initiatives, from photography courses to training programmes and high-level masterclasses. This year it wanted to go even bigger, abandoning its digital form for a while and becoming a physical event.

From 23 to 26 September, in fact, the Binario Centrale of Bologna’s DumBo will host the first edition of the international photography festival PhMuseum Days.

The theme chosen for this first edition is A New Beginning and it perfectly fits both the historical moment we are living and the new decade that has just begun and because the event represents a new adventure for PhMuseum.

The 4-day programme includes individual exhibitions, a collective installation, workshops, portfolio reviews, screenings, performances and a space dedicated to independent publishing.

Guests include Argentinean photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg, whose Natur-e reflects on the relationship between man, nature and technology, and Brazilian photographer Angelica Dass, who will be exhibiting Humanae, a project that seeks to demonstrate that what defines the human being is his inescapable uniqueness.

There will also be the Encounter project by Italian photographer Silvia Rosi, who starts from her family album to tell stories of migration and diaspora through self-portraits and performances, and Afterlife by French photographer Vasantha Yogananthan, who tells the eternal challenge between good and evil by reinterpreting a passage from the Indian epic poem Ramayana.

In addition, three works chosen from over 700 projects submitted through the festival’s open call will be on display: Human by Ecuadorian photographer Fabiola Cedillo, focusing on the human need to reproduce, naturally and through technology; Fading Senses by Polish photographer Ligia Poplawska, on the implications of the loss of ecosystems on our mental and emotional health; and finally, C-R92/BY by British photographer Samuel Fordham, a project focusing on thousands of British families separated as a result of Home Office policies.

Visit the PhMuseum website and follow the Instagram profile to keep up with all the updates.

Fading Senses, Ligia Popławska
C-R92_BY, Samuel Fordham
Contemporary photography comes to Bologna with PhMuseum Days
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Luisa Mazzanti, between portraits and artistic nude

Luisa Mazzanti, between portraits and artistic nude

Giulia Guido · 1 day ago · Photography

Photography is much more than an image. It is an experience that starts from the photographer, passes through the subject and reaches the viewer. It is sharing emotions, moods, values and feelings.
If you’re not sure this is the case, Luisa Mazzanti‘s shots will certainly change your mind. 

Born in Lucca and moved to Milan, Luisa Mazzanti is a fine-art photographer of only 23 years old who, despite her young age, already has clear ideas on what messages and what stories to tell with her photos.

There are two genres in which Luisa has specialized, the portrait and the artistic nude.
Through the portraits she manages to capture the attention and curiosity of the viewer: the gazes of the models that point straight at us wrap us and do not let us go.
Instead, through the photographic nude she fights the aesthetic canons imposed by society and shows bodies free to show their forms in all their unique beauty. 

Sometimes it also happens that she becomes the subject of the shots, engaging in self-portraits of impact in which photography becomes the means by which to enhance their bodies and the body, with its natural beauty elevates photography to art. 

Read also: The intimate and analog self-portraits by Celeste Ortiz

Check out below some shots of Luisa Mazzanti and do not miss her future works follow her on Instagram and visit her website

Luisa Mazzanti
Luisa Mazzanti
Luisa Mazzanti, between portraits and artistic nude
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Luisa Mazzanti, between portraits and artistic nude
Luisa Mazzanti, between portraits and artistic nude
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The taste of summer in Julien Pounchou’s photos

The taste of summer in Julien Pounchou’s photos

Giulia Guido · 1 day ago · Photography

A summer is always exceptional, whether it is hot or cold, dry or wet.” wrote Gustave Flaubert. That summer is always exceptional is an indisputable truth, it is that time of year when everything seems possible, when everything is waiting for a new beginning, when our days are freed from the daily routine, our mind is freed from duties and work to do, our body is freed from all its beauty. Summer is waiting, happiness and nostalgia at the same time. Capturing the essence of summer is almost impossible and when someone succeeds in this task it is always a pleasant rediscovery. One of these is Julien Pounchou, a French photographer who lives and works in Barcelona. 

Julien specializes in portraits and fashion photography, but among his work, there is always a constant that can be found in all his shots: the summer atmosphere

The subjects he photographs, from the colorful costumes, to the faces without make-up, to the tanned skin, are illuminated by the warm light typical of the summer months, the sun’s rays embrace everything and looking at the images we can almost feel its warmth. Julien Pounchou’s photographs are extremely natural and the choice of analog makes them even more particular, immediately giving them a style that recalls that of the 60s and 70s. And perhaps it’s their spontaneity that makes them as exceptional as Flaubert’s summer. 

Below you can find a selection of shots by Julien Pounchou, but to find out more go to his website and follow him on Instagram!

The taste of summer in Julien Pounchou’s photos
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