The bond between Aimé Leon Dore and Tyrrell Winston

The bond between Aimé Leon Dore and Tyrrell Winston

Andrea Tuzio · 1 month ago · Style

Last Friday, Aimé Leon Dore launched its Fall/Winter 2022 collection.
As is now customary, the collection was an immediate success, both among the brand’s fans (among whom I count myself) and insiders.

As usual then, the collection was preceded by a series of campaign videos that recount the inspirations, philosophy, and narrative behind the exploration that Aimé Leon Dore has been pursuing since its inception.

The brand, which is becoming a symbol of New York City around the world, has also opened a flagship in Europe, in London to be exact, where the second Café Leon Dore, after the one in New York, has also been built inside, an establishment that takes inspiration from French cafe culture but especially from Greek cafe culture – Teddy Santis, the founder of Aimé Leon Dore is of Hellenic descent.

The American brand’s London flagship is gorgeous: the dark wood paneling and tasteful furnishings make it a splendid example of how the in-store experience is more alive than ever.
What caught everyone’s attention, however, is a wall at the back of the store, decorated with a grid composed of a series of deflated basketballs. But what exactly are they?

Those old, deflated basketballs on the wall of Aimé Leon Dore’s London flagship are a work of art by New York-based artist Tyrrell Winston, commissioned by Santis himself to create a juxtaposition between the store’s own vintage boutique style and the contemporary nature of the work, while at the same time expressing the visceral bond that ties the brand and the Big Apple in a double-bind.

The work is titled “English Breakfast” and is an extension of Winston’s ius commitment to clean up the streets of cigarette butts, broken baskets and, indeed, old and deflated basketballs and turn them into art, his art. 

“I work with universal objects that stretch across cultures and places. I’m re-contextualizing the overlooked in a way that becomes unavoidable.

The inspirations behind Tyrrell Winston’s work are represented by Marcel Duchamp and Davis Hammons, two artists who made objects found by chance on the street their source of artistic inspiration.

Winston puts viewers in the position of having to confront social and cultural themes and issues by starting with an element such as garbage, changing its meaning through storytelling and the symbolism that exists behind simple objects.

Teddy Santis has been like a mentor to Winston. In fact, after purchasing and exhibiting one of his works in the New York store, the artist came in contact with a Japanese collector who put him in touch with Takashi Murakami, who allowed him to have an exhibition in Tokyo in 2019.

What clearly transpires is that it is no accident that Aimé Leon Dore and Tyrrell Winston have developed this kind of connection: indeed, both explore the beauty, culture, and history of New York through symbols that, though not blatantly, reflect the Big Apple’s unique and distinctive atmosphere.

The bond between Aimé Leon Dore and Tyrrell Winston
Style
The bond between Aimé Leon Dore and Tyrrell Winston
The bond between Aimé Leon Dore and Tyrrell Winston
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The distorted world seen with the fish-eye

The distorted world seen with the fish-eye

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Locked in his laboratory at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Meryland, optical physics professor Robert W. Wood was working on an experiment aimed at replicating the way fish saw underwater. It was 1906, and his tools were a bucket full of water, a pinhole camera, a mirror glass, and plenty of light, essential paraphernalia that would not prevent Wood from discovering and inventing what would become known in the history of photography as the fish-eye.
After its first uses in science, the image distortion created with the fish-eye will become perfect for representing in photography the hippie psychedelia of the 1960s and the rock rebellion in the years to follow. Hip-hop will use the fish-eye aesthetic for album covers and videos, as will sports, leveraging its ability to best capture the energy of freestyle and outdoor disciplines.

In 1911 Robert W. Wood succeeded in publishing “Phisical Optics,” the book collecting his research in optics, but the fish-eye still remained for a long time an exclusive for scientists stooped over test tubes and microorganisms.
It was not until 1935 that a patent was filed for a circular lens that used glass and not water as the distorting surface. The patent was filed sharing with the Japanese company Nikon, but again it took more than two decades before the discovery became affordable. Perhaps it is too much to say “affordable,” since the first lens put on sale in 1957 cost $27,000.
The final arrival in stores five years later delivered the fish-eye to the artistic, musical, sports and journalistic culture of the 1900s, now that at last even amateur or semiprofessional photographers could take pictures with that particular 180-degree view.

Fish-eye | Collater.al

Immediately beginning in the 1960s, photographers made important political and artistic portraits and reports, witnessing historical events such as American elections or the albums of great artists such as the Beatles and Rolling Stone; it was in ’66 that the cover of Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass) in which Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones are shot with the fish-eye.
Crossing the fish-eye story is not just rock. The psychedelic ’60s and hippies could replicate with the wide-angle lens the distortion of reality caused by hallucinogens, while hip-hop, starting in the ’90s, that ability to have a more street, irreverent, and if necessary funny point of view, in which the on-camera looks of artists such as Notorius B.I.G., Beastie Boys, and Busta Rhymes were enhanced even more.
Panoramic views of breathtaking locations and even the first photos taken on Mars, the fish-eye has a history that has taken it from being a scientific marvel to a peephole through which to look at more than half a century of artistic and cultural history.

Fish-eye | Collater.al

The distorted world seen with the fish-eye
Photography
The distorted world seen with the fish-eye
The distorted world seen with the fish-eye
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Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos

Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

The balance between the human figure and the landscape is the key to Lisa Strautmann‘s shots. Born in 1988, Lisa Strautmann is a German photographer who has had a different path than many of her colleagues. In fact, she has earned no less than two degrees, neither of them in the arts or photography: the first in physical education and the second in psychology. 

Her course of study, however, led her to have the approach she has today to the photographic medium and the subjects she shoots. We almost always see one or more figures in the center of the composition, naked, in unnatural and contrived poses. All around are the colors of nature, from the bright green of the grass to the clear blue of the sky. 

With these images, Lisa Strautmann manages to merge her being an adult, feminist woman with a deep love for nature and the connection humans can make with it. 

Discover more of Lisa Strautmann’s work on her website and Instagram profile

Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos
Photography
Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos
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Tatiana Cardellicchio stops the motion of nature

Tatiana Cardellicchio stops the motion of nature

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Photography, when it wants to convey universal emotions, has more strength when it is shared with other people from its earliest stages. Tatiana Cardellicchio owes much to meeting and collaborating with other creatives, who have inspired her, reinforcing an already clear idea of art that is enhanced when seen as a whole and not as individual shots.
There is often a human figure in Tatiana Cardellicchio’s photos, isolated in the world in a moment of pause, in which the perpetual motion of life seems to have been interrupted in favor of a more meditative relationship with nature and the elements that make it up.

The sea becomes a kind of baptismal water, the blades of grass in the meadow instead the perfect surface in which to abandon the body, often of a young woman, which does not impose its silhouette in the landscape but adapts to the rocks or the stool left in the corner of the room.
With a career as a photo retoucher and photo editor, the shots on the photographer’s Instagram profile show a more intimate look in which enhancing the plasticity of the body is a mission, as is blurring the edges between the human figure and nature, in a game of participation in the natural cycle that it is easy to want to be a part of.

Tatiana Cardellicchio | Collater.al
Tatiana Cardellicchio | Collater.al
Tatiana Cardellicchio | Collater.al
Tatiana Cardellicchio | Collater.al
Tatiana Cardellicchio | Collater.al
Tatiana Cardellicchio | Collater.al

A Tatiana Cardellicchio’s shot will be at Collater.al Photography 2022.

Tatiana Cardellicchio stops the motion of nature
Photography
Tatiana Cardellicchio stops the motion of nature
Tatiana Cardellicchio stops the motion of nature
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @eli_rmn, @erre62, @sara_gram._, @saraperacchia, @defalcotina, @giulia.pissagroia, @teresa_scafa, @izya777, @marco.pasini.photo, @marcocarta87.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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