Angelina Jolie opens her atelier in Basquiat’s studio

Angelina Jolie opens her atelier in Basquiat’s studio

Giorgia Massari · 2 months ago · Design

What do Angelina Jolie, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Andy Warhol have in common? As announced last spring, American superstar Angelina Jolie has launched her brand Atelier Jolie, which finds its physical space in a unique location: Andy Warhol’s house, also known as Basquiat’s workplace.

The house, located in Manhattan’s East Village and rented for $60,000 a month, is the new headquarters of Atelier Jolie. Choosing this location proves to be successful both in terms of brand identity and communication strategy. Atelier Jolie is not just a fashion brand but also a collective, intending to bring together a community of tailors, pattern makers, and international artisans, offering them the opportunity to create new garments with unused and vintage fabrics. But let’s learn more about the history of this place.

Originally built in 1860 as a stable at 57 Great Jones Street, the building later came under the ownership of the Five Points Gang led by mobster Paul Kelly. In 1970, Andy Warhol acquired the two-story, 613-square-meter structure, renting it to Basquiat, who lived and worked there from 1983 until his death in 1988. In 2018, the house was the site of an exhibition featuring works by cult street artists from the 1970s, including Al Diaz, co-creator of the iconic SAMO© tag, aka Same Old Shit, alongside Basquiat. Al Diaz himself recently stated that the graffiti discovered during the renovation were not made by Basquiat but by him during the 2018 exhibition.

Foto- J. Scott Orr

But what does the art world (and beyond) think of Jolie’s choice?

We found out by reading an article in Ocula Magazine that reports some comments from scholars and people close to Basquiat. «Should it be a tribute to Basquiat?» said photographer Richard Corman, Basquiat’s last portraitist, «He stayed there for a while, so it could have become anything. And Angelina is an artist so… it’s not a Chase Bank». Alexis Adler, who shared the space with Basquiat for a period, also reflects on the transformation of the place, saying: «It is still associated with him and the art he made there. It could have become a McDonald’s or something that would have no association with him. I hope Jolie understands that she is in an important space and maybe she will pay homage to it in some way». Art historian and Basquiat scholar Dieter Buchhart, on the other hand, raises critical questions about Jolie’s decision to turn the building into a fashion atelier. Buchhart suggests that there are more appropriate alternatives to preserve the artist’s legacy, highlighting the lack of respect in adopting a commercial perspective. «There have been much less important artists who have received museums. …This space, this Great Jones Street, is the only connection to the city, to Warhol, to everything. I think this should really be respected». We can only wait to see how this place, which aims to become a kind of fashion factory, will be animated.

Amir Hamja: The New York Times
Angelina Jolie opens her atelier in Basquiat’s studio
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Angelina Jolie opens her atelier in Basquiat’s studio
Angelina Jolie opens her atelier in Basquiat’s studio
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Richard Koek captured the two Tokyo

Richard Koek captured the two Tokyo

Giorgia Massari · 2 weeks ago · Photography

After New York New York, Dutch-Argentinian photographer Richard Koek announces the release of his photography book Tokyo Tokyo, available April 30. In the title, the repetition of the city’s name is already meant to be a first clue to what his shots will reveal. Koek looks for the dualism that every city holds in its essence. In the case of Tokyo, tradition on the one hand and extreme contemporaneity on the other. Clichés collapse and make way for the real daily life of the inhabitants of the Japanese capital, but capturing it was not easy.

richard koek

«I did not realise it was quite an impossible task to fulfil,» Koek explains in an interview with Creative Boom. «Tokyo cannot be captured in one book, it has 40,000,000 citizens and is way more spread out than New York City. I did find a way that somehow made sense for a book, and I hope I succeeded in capturing it». Without a doubt, Koek reveals a curious side of the city, highlighting the stark contrast that characterizes the Edochian universe. Let’s find out through some of the shots shown in the preview.

A waiting room, four women dress in traditional clothes but on their legs are resting decidedly modern-day purses, as are their hairstyles.

What Richard Koek points out is that Tokyo Tokyo is everything you do not expect from this city. As a tourist, as an outsider, when you leave for Tokyo you have a very clear idea of what to expect, provided mainly by the images propagated by the media, but when you come back this idea is overturned. «My book will show two sides of the city; the beauty in centuries-old traditions, as well as the beauty in daily life of the moment that we all live,» Koek explains again to Creative Boom. Indeed, another aspect that emerges is the rapid evolution of the city, which, while jealously preserving traditions, is also constantly changing, both from an architectural point of view – new buildings are constantly springing up – and from a socio-cultural point of view.

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Courtesy Richard Koek

Richard Koek captured the two Tokyo
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Richard Koek captured the two Tokyo
Richard Koek captured the two Tokyo
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Cenk Erdoğan and the Turkish Fair Tradition

Cenk Erdoğan and the Turkish Fair Tradition

Anna Frattini · 2 weeks ago · Photography

The world of county fairs in Turkey is an integral part of Anatolian culture. These are not simple annual events but embody tradition in the truest sense of the word. Turkish photographer Cenk Erdoğan tells us about these realities, delving into the lives of those who work in these contexts rich in local tradition and culture. The project is called It’s Not Fair, and it’s a true nomadic journey, characterized by tents and seasonal migration. In Erdoğan’s images, the sweltering atmosphere of Anatolia seems palpable, inhabited by nomadic families who set up and dismantle tents from one city to another. The subsistence of these people depends on this migratory movement, spending winter months in stable areas where they engage in agriculture, trade, and temporary work to sustain themselves until the next fair season.

Cenk Erdoğan

What Cenk Erdoğan Reveals

Days are busy with the hard work required by traveling fairs: setting up and dismantling equipment, long journeys to the next fair, and the constant struggle to make ends meet. Cenk Erdoğan also reveals some of the behind-the-scenes of these images: a significant portion of these people’s earnings is swallowed up by fairground owners as rent. Despite these challenges, fair workers persevere, driven by a shared sense of purpose and the desire to preserve their cultural heritage.

The Stories Within It’s Not Fair

Erdoğan’s lens captures both the hardships and the humanity of these individuals, weaving a narrative that transcends mere documentation. Through his photographs, he sheds light on the complexities of their lives: the camaraderie forged amidst adversity, the joy of entertaining crowds, and the pride in keeping the vibrant traditions of Anatolia alive. In It’s Not Fair, Erdoğan not only captures fleeting moments but also preserves a way of life as enduring as it is essential to Anatolian identity. Through his lens, county fair workers are immortalized, their stories told with dignity and respect, ensuring that their legacy continues to resonate for generations to come.

Cenk Erdoğan and the Turkish Fair Tradition
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Cenk Erdoğan and the Turkish Fair Tradition
Cenk Erdoğan and the Turkish Fair Tradition
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The motions of an immobile province

The motions of an immobile province

Anna Frattini · 1 week ago · Photography

Searching Busto Arsizio on Google, one of the most explanatory descriptions of the Italian municipality – inhabited by 90,000 people – can be found on Wikipedia. «[…] an important industrial and commercial hub in an urbanized context.» According to Alessandro Galli, born in ’98, Busto Arsizio instead «is an original copy of any other city in the Milanese hinterland, with the ambition to always remain the same.» From this reflection arises 21052 copia (di copia) originale, a photographic project that aims to provide an unconventional view of Busto Arsizio, paying attention to what the locals take for granted. In short, it’s a reflection on the province that prompts us to think about the city-hinterland dichotomy so prevalent in our country.

21052 copia (di copia) originale, a reportage of Busto Arsizio according to Alessandro Galli

Since 2021, Alessandro Galli has been trying to move to Milan. Now that he has succeeded, he wanted to retrace with us the years of waiting in Busto Arsizio, the immobility of a province that, seeing many of its young inhabitants leave, decides not to change, to remain always the same. Galli’s intention is to reflect on urban decay and the lack of improvements implemented over time. But not only that, in Galli’s shots, there is also a particular – and unsettling – kind of beauty that usually goes unnoticed.

The reflection on the province also extends to a fanzine, released last year, which revisits all the places where Galli decided to shoot. There are also five things that according to the photographer one should know about Busto and about him. An expedient that, in addition to the shots, allows us to go beyond the image but also a real farewell to his city where – at least in part – he developed his aesthetic taste. Some of the photographs reflect Busto Arsizio’s ambition to resemble Milan in a significant immobility. There’s the girl balanced on tiptoes, the construction sites, the activities first opened then closed. The neglect around the Castellanza station is particularly significant according to the photographer. There are also images that, according to Galli, are «closely linked to his photographic taste,» such as the underpass illuminated by a green traffic light or the overgrown bush at the entrance of a condominium in Busto Arsizio.

The fanzine

21052 copia (di copia) originale was born in 2021, in the midst of the Covid-19 emergency. With the end of the curfew, on a Saturday morning at 5 a.m., the photographer left five copies of the fanzine around the city in five locations along with a flyer with the graphics you see below in the slider. First, a kind of Terms and Conditions to accept when you start living in Busto Arsizio, and then a map of the places according to Galli. An original idea that speaks of the province in a definitely innovative way. Included in the flyer is also the most important artwork preserved in the city. It is the Anonymous Painting dating back to the 17th century and preserved in the Museum of Sacred Art San Michele Arcangelo. The artwork depicts a priest blessing a plague victim in the lazaretto of Busto Arsizio.

Alessandro Galli’s photographs will be on display from May 2nd to May 5th at the Liquida PhotoFestival.

The motions of an immobile province
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What’s left of the War according to Gabriele Micalizzi

What’s left of the War according to Gabriele Micalizzi

Collater.al Contributors · 1 week ago · Photography

At 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS, the Milan gallery on Via San Vittore, the photographs of Gabriele Micalizzi, guest of Spigola, a Collater.al podcast, are on display. On the occasion of the interview, we had the opportunity to delve into what is the photojournalist’s activity especially in war territory. Titled A Kind of Beauty, the exhibition open from today April 4 is curated by Tiziana Castelluzzo. The exhibition presents a selection of photographs, ranging from black and white printed with silver salts to color, carefully chosen from negatives kept in the artist’s archive.

gabriele micalizzi
© Gabriele Micalizzi – Manifesto, March of Return, Gaza, 2018 – Courtesy of 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery_WEB

The images on display capture significant moments from the major theaters of conflict over the past two decades, from the tumultuous Arab Spring to Middle Eastern conflicts against the caliphate to the current crises in Ukraine and Palestine. The exhibition is notable for its innovative approach to documentary photography, embracing an aesthetic and meaning that transcends mere informational purpose. Micalizzi’s works not only document conflicts, but evoke an autonomous and coherent world, rich in poetry and power. The photographer’s artistic approach induces the viewer to reflect on the complex meanings of historical events, conveying emotions and feelings through each shot.

 Gabriele Micalizzi
© Gabriele Micalizzi – Mock Death, March of Return, Gaza, 2018 – Courtesy of 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery_WEB
What’s left of the War according to Gabriele Micalizzi
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What’s left of the War according to Gabriele Micalizzi
What’s left of the War according to Gabriele Micalizzi
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