Art Ant Hamlyn and the consistency of artwork
Artart

Ant Hamlyn and the consistency of artwork

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Tommaso Berra
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al

The artworks of London-based artist Ant Hamlyn (1993) look like grown-up children’s toys squashed in the bottom of some box. The container the artist uses, however, are transparent display cases, or panels crushing compositions of flowers and colourful plants, creating thematic and material contrasts that must be kept in mind in order to understand Hamlyn’s entire production.
Starting with digital fabrication and materials such as polyurethane, fibre for padding, glossy paint or plywood, the artist creates crushed still lives that highlight contrasts such as that between soft and hard, between coloured and transparent.
Ant Hamlyn’s playful approach speaks to institutional art by referring to childlike fun, to simple and banal forms like those of nature. Attention to detail is reflected in the finishes, hand-sewn by the artist himself. Nostalgia, preservation and magic are some of the pillars of his works, as are technology and the perception of a material consistency that is only suggested to the observer, to be guessed through a game of memories and reconstruction of materials thanks to memory.
Hamlyn’s works also include a work on advertising signs and kinetics, which you can discover on the artist’s website.

Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Ant Hamlyn | Collater.al
Artart
Written by Tommaso Berra
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