Art Top 8 installations at Art Basel Unlimited
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Top 8 installations at Art Basel Unlimited

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Giorgia Massari
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

Art Basel, the queen of all art fairs, returns to Basel from 15 to 18 June, hosting over 200 galleries from all over the world. Since 1970 Art Basel has been attracting collectors, gallery owners, artists and insiders, reconfirming itself every year as one of the nerve centres of the international art world.
With more than 4,000 artists, this year’s selection is broad and heterogeneous, but the Unlimited section is certainly the most striking. In fact, since 1999 the fair has reserved a special place for large-scale works that are impossible to install in standard booths. Large sculptures, vast installations, live performances and video projections enliven this side of the fair, which this year becomes the number one protagonist on social media. Interactivity, gigantism and lighting effects are complicit in this year’s success of Unlimited, which had lost some of its “wow” effect in recent years.
Today we show you the 8 projects that intrigued us the most, both from an aesthetic and content point of view.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#1 Environnement Chromointerférent by Carlos Cruz-Diez (Galleria Continua)

Carlos Cruz-Diez‘s is undoubtedly the most instagrammed installation of the fair, thanks to its playful interactivity with the public and the coloured lights. Galleria Continua chose the work of the colour theorist par excellence, which after years still remains incredibly topical. The work was in fact created in 1974 by the Venezuelan artist, who passed away in 2019.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#2 Relocation, Among Other Things by Khalil Rabah (Sfeir-Semler Gallery)

The work by Palestinian artist Khalil Rabah addresses the theme of nomadism, referring in particular to exile and flight in a context of war. The work, presented by the Sfeir-Semler Gallery, is constantly in transformation, adapting itself to the host space from time to time. In this way, the artist creates a parallelism between the work and nomadic life, condemned to constant displacement.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#3 Topa by Jason Rhoades (Hauser & Wirth)

Jason Rhoades’ work is also all the rage on social media. In recent years, neon has made a big comeback in international exhibitions and is once again the material of choice for many artists. Rhoades has always included it in his work, which focuses on the use of light. Topa is from 2005 and derives from the larger work My Medinah, In pursuit of my ermitage… presenting a selection of terms describing the female genital.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#4 Dust 002 by Wu Chi-Tsung (Sean Kelly)

The magical effect of the work by Wu Chi-Tsung, born in 1981 in Tapei, comes from a combination of light, dust and projection. By means of a live feed, a camera positioned in front of an object that partially blocks the light, captures the dust floating in the room. The captured image is then enlarged and projected onto a LED wall. The artist’s intention is to investigate how technology filters our perception of the world.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#5 Tightrope 4 by Elias Sime (James Cohan Gallery)

Elias Sime – born in ’68 and based in Addis Ababa – produces large-scale works, reflecting on components such as electrical wires, microchips and computer hardware. Sime speaks of tightropes, referring to the fine balance between technology and human interaction. It all began in 2009 when the artist focused on the art of assemblage and architectural installations from his home country of Ethiopia. The work on show at Art Basel presented by the James Cohan Gallery, Tightrope 4, only reflects his distinctive mark and remains one of Unlimited’s most interesting works.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#6 Never Again by Monica Bonvicini (Galerie Peter Kilchmann, Galerie Krinzinger, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery)

With this interactive installation, Monica Bonvicini explores the relationship between spaces and human behaviour, highlighting how the environment predominantly influences human actions. The installation, set in the aseptic environment of the fairground, is stark and rigid, especially the large number of chains swinging in the space. The work is dated 2005 and incorporates research into psychoanalysis and sexuality.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#7 Čiurlionis Gym by Augustas Serbians (Apalazzo Gallery)

Čiurlionis Gym by Augustas Serbians is presented as a gymnasium. The artist returns to his school archives to make copies of her remodelled plaster works, which are then used as weights to be lifted. The work focuses on the premises of an art education that many times relies on copying, a fitting comparison to that of the gymnasium. In both cases it is based on repetitive actions and hard work. Serapinas’ installation not only pleasantly surprises patrons but also makes them reflect on a system that needs to be increasingly questioned.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

#8 Laporello by Ursula Reuter Christiansen (Von Bartha Gallery)

The characters condensed in LaporelloUrsula Reuter Christiansen‘s installation – have a powerful story, united in an intimate moment. They all act as representatives of their generation, with each panel telling the story of courage, survival and power. As a whole, Reuter Christiansen’s brushstrokes, presented by the von Bartha Gallery, reflect sensual demonstrations of the German artist’s inner being.

Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al
Art Basel Unlimited | Collater.al

Find out more about Unlimited on Art Basel‘s website

Courtesy Art Basel

Artart
Written by Giorgia Massari
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