Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin

Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin

Collater.al Contributors · 2 months ago · Art

At the foot of a hill in Mexico City, a pavilion with concrete walls assembled like a puzzle and marked by a series of bulbous volumes with small white circles patterned across them is revealed up among the trees.

This is Egaligilo, the pavilion designed by architect Gerardo Borissin for this year’s Design Week Mexico festival in Chapultepec Forest. “The project acts as a balance of forces between rational and parametric architecture while preserving a natural environment inside,” said the architect. The perforated wall is designed to allow sunlight, rain, and oxygen to reach the interior and maintain the microclimate necessary for a small forest.  

It seeks to raise public awareness of the recycling of ephemeral structures and the main purpose of architecture: benefit to humanity,” said Borissin.

Text by Giordana Bonanno.

Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin
Art
Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin
Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin
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Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels

Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

The history of clothing labels began almost with the birth of the concept of fashion. The appearance of labels is closely linked to the value of a designer to sign his creation then, since the ’50s of the nineteenth century, these small pieces of embroidered fabric have undergone an extraordinary evolution, changing color, shape, passing from being sewn inside the garments to be applied on the outside, clearly visible to all.

Today the so-called labels no longer have that value, so much so that more and more often they are cut or detached, but only a couple of decades ago brands and boutiques were free to create the strangest and most eccentric labels possible.

In Instagram profile labeltime you can find the most beautiful, eccentric and colorful labels.

The profile made its debut in 2013 and was born from the mind of Dana Cohen, a girl from San Francisco who loves vintage clothes. Labeltime is a sort of collector of all the labels that Dana grieves while going around the markets.

In our gallery, you will find a selection!

labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels
Art
Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels
Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels
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Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann

Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

It seems that the member states of the European Union have not been able to reach an agreement this time, so the decision on the type of postponement of Brexit has been postponed again. The more time passes, the more complicated the situation seems to be and keeping up with all the news is very difficult. Not to mention those who, unaware until now of what is happening, try to approach the subject for the first time. Let’s face it, it would take a diagram. 

That’s why the New York Times called on Christoph Niemann, one of the most famous and renowned illustrators of our times, to entrust him with the arduous task of describing the current situation of the European Union through images. 

This is how The Illustrated Guide to Brexit was born, in which Christoph combines photographs and sketches, accompanied by short captions that retrace the history of Brexit, creating interesting links with other current situations such as that between England and Ireland, but also with past events, such as the events that led to the birth of the Anglican Church. 

Christoph Niemann’s work demonstrates, once again, how art can become the perfect tool to interpret our time and make it accessible to all. 

Below are some of his illustrations, for the complete Guide go to the New York Times website

Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann
Art
Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann
Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann
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Charlotte Edey and her surreal illustrations

Charlotte Edey and her surreal illustrations

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

Her name is Charlotte Edey and she is an illustrator and artist from London whose works have captured our attention. Looking at her works you can see right away that the elements that coexist in her illustrations are many and studying her works more carefully you can see that none of them would be so perfect without the others.  

The soft colors and shades of pink give life to surreal scenarios in which the geometric and angular shapes of the architecture blend with the soft ones of the landscape. The quotation to Esher does not go unnoticed: often we find stairs that start from nothing and arrive at nothing, that cross the different levels and create a sense of movement. 

Charlotte Edey’s drawings not only live on paper but are also made on different supports from ceramic to concrete, becoming also tapestries, discover a selection in our gallery. 

Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey | Collater.al
Charlotte Edey and her surreal illustrations
Art
Charlotte Edey and her surreal illustrations
Charlotte Edey and her surreal illustrations
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Return to the Real, Doug Aitken’s exhibition

Return to the Real, Doug Aitken’s exhibition

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

Not long ago we talked about Doug Aitken on the occasion of the installation Don’t Forget to Breathe realized in California with the collaboration of RYOT. Today we return to talk about him because the artist, always following the style of the previous work is on display at the Victoria Miro Gallery in London with Return to the Real

Within the exhibition, open until December 20, 2019, the public will interface with two installations, All Doors Open and Inside Out, with which Doug Aitken tries to explore the relationships between men, but also between man and the world around him, in perpetual change. 

In the first one, a human figure in opaque resin returns, illuminated with blue LED lights – as we had already seen in Don’t Forget to Breathe – piled up on a table. The only elements that surround her are everyday objects, such as the inevitable smartphone, a bowl full of fruit or a shopping bag. 

The second installation consists of a female figure made of Zebrino marble that comes to life thanks to a series of mirrors, pink and blue lights. In both works, the sound aspect plays a fundamental role and manages to give life to the sculptures. 

Return to the Real by Doug Aitken is a portrait of contemporaneity, of a world in which the boundary between virtual and real is increasingly subtle and imperceptible. 

Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real la mostra di Doug Aitken | Collater.al
Return to the Real, Doug Aitken’s exhibition
Art
Return to the Real, Doug Aitken’s exhibition
Return to the Real, Doug Aitken’s exhibition
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