The last stage of the Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab

The last stage of the Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab

Andrea Tuzio · 2 years ago · Style

After the success of the first two stages – dedicated to mountain biking and trail running – Vibram launched the last virtual stage of the Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab focused on the lifestyle, sneaker and especially green world, offering the possibility to customize sneakers, boots and derby shoes with a sole made with the new Vibram N-OIL compound, created with 90% natural materials and dyed with natural pigments from plants and roots.

This innovative compound represents the Italian company’s solution to offer a sustainable alternative: created with 90% natural materials and dyed with 100% natural pigments from plants and roots.

Those who wish can request the replacement of their sole with a Vibram sole made with the new Vibram N-OIL compound: the iconic Vibram Carrarmato design – ideal on more structured shoes such as boots or boots – or with a Vibram “flat” sole, perfect for sneakers or casual shoes.

Anyone who is interested in participating and trying this new compound by Vibram can register on the Vibram Testerplace platform until November 27th.

The user who made the registration and submitted the request will be contacted by the Vibram Sole Factor team that will evaluate, together with the customer, the feasibility of resurfacing. Once the feasibility has been confirmed, Vibram will organize for free the collection of the shoes and the return when the work is finished.

This project emphasizes Vibram’s great commitment to the implementation of innovative procedures in production processes, in order to optimize the environmental and social impact.

The last stage of the Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab
Style
The last stage of the Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab
The last stage of the Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab
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Lights and shadows in Irene Gittarelli’s shots

Lights and shadows in Irene Gittarelli’s shots

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

A veil of mystery covers the shots of Irene Gittarelli, a photographer and visual artist from Turin based in Padua. Photography has always been within her plans, first graduating from the Albertina Academy of Fine Arts in Turin and then attending the Master of Photography at the Brera Academy in Milan. 

Her artistic production deals with themes such as human frailty and the relationship between man and the landscape around him, not surprisingly often influenced by the humanities, art and cinema. 

Irene Gittarelli’s photographs are compositions in which elegance and mystery come together through a calibrated balance of light and shadow. These contrasts between light and dark blend perfectly with the light of the sunset, a recurring element in her compositions, which symbolizes a deep sense of hope. 

One can sense from the images the photographer’s ability to connect with the subject she is shooting, a connection that is somehow imprinted in the photo. Discover Irene Gittarelli’s work on her website and Instagram profile

Irene Gittarelli
Irene Gittarelli
Irene Gittarelli
Irene Gittarelli
Irene Gittarelli
Lights and shadows in Irene Gittarelli’s shots
Photography
Lights and shadows in Irene Gittarelli’s shots
Lights and shadows in Irene Gittarelli’s shots
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Anastasia Mihaylova: “Nude is the most beautiful art form”

Anastasia Mihaylova: “Nude is the most beautiful art form”

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

“Nude is the most beautiful art form”

How can we really feel close to the subjects represented in works of art? It would be magic to think that the paintings in the museums can speak to us, tell us what they want to communicate and what the characters are living, many times described only through the pen of some art historian. However, we have one thing in common with Venuses or knights: the body. The great masters of art have represented feelings through the body, described for what it was, centuries ago as today.
Anastasia Mihaylova‘s shots connect this union between the naked body of the present and the past, described in works of art. It is a close relationship, in which intimacy is not involved, where complicity is enclosed in the naked beauty of bodies, the most beautiful art form according to the photographer.
That of Anastasia Mihaylova is an exercise that through photography also wants to denounce censorship in contemporary art, which recently deleted the artist’s social profiles. Instagram’s discrimination against certain creatives is a central theme of Mihaylova’s recent production. With “Nude is the most beautiful art form” the photographer wants to highlight the beauty of art and the body as inspiration and harmony of form. The naked body is an important aspect throughout the history of painting and sculpture, a model to be copied in the atelier or to represent the divine purity.
Three women share the scene and the relationship with the works hanging on the walls of a museum, a choreography, an act of courtship but also a framed mirror in which to see themselves.

Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al
Anastasia Mihaylova | Collater.al

A shot by Anastasia Mihaylova will be on display at Collater.al Photography 2022.

Anastasia Mihaylova: “Nude is the most beautiful art form”
Photography
Anastasia Mihaylova: “Nude is the most beautiful art form”
Anastasia Mihaylova: “Nude is the most beautiful art form”
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The distorted world seen with the fish-eye

The distorted world seen with the fish-eye

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

Locked in his laboratory at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Meryland, optical physics professor Robert W. Wood was working on an experiment aimed at replicating the way fish saw underwater. It was 1906, and his tools were a bucket full of water, a pinhole camera, a mirror glass, and plenty of light, essential paraphernalia that would not prevent Wood from discovering and inventing what would become known in the history of photography as the fish-eye.
After its first uses in science, the image distortion created with the fish-eye will become perfect for representing in photography the hippie psychedelia of the 1960s and the rock rebellion in the years to follow. Hip-hop will use the fish-eye aesthetic for album covers and videos, as will sports, leveraging its ability to best capture the energy of freestyle and outdoor disciplines.

In 1911 Robert W. Wood succeeded in publishing “Phisical Optics,” the book collecting his research in optics, but the fish-eye still remained for a long time an exclusive for scientists stooped over test tubes and microorganisms.
It was not until 1935 that a patent was filed for a circular lens that used glass and not water as the distorting surface. The patent was filed sharing with the Japanese company Nikon, but again it took more than two decades before the discovery became affordable. Perhaps it is too much to say “affordable,” since the first lens put on sale in 1957 cost $27,000.
The final arrival in stores five years later delivered the fish-eye to the artistic, musical, sports and journalistic culture of the 1900s, now that at last even amateur or semiprofessional photographers could take pictures with that particular 180-degree view.

Fish-eye | Collater.al

Immediately beginning in the 1960s, photographers made important political and artistic portraits and reports, witnessing historical events such as American elections or the albums of great artists such as the Beatles and Rolling Stone; it was in ’66 that the cover of Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass) in which Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones are shot with the fish-eye.
Crossing the fish-eye story is not just rock. The psychedelic ’60s and hippies could replicate with the wide-angle lens the distortion of reality caused by hallucinogens, while hip-hop, starting in the ’90s, that ability to have a more street, irreverent, and if necessary funny point of view, in which the on-camera looks of artists such as Notorius B.I.G., Beastie Boys, and Busta Rhymes were enhanced even more.
Panoramic views of breathtaking locations and even the first photos taken on Mars, the fish-eye has a history that has taken it from being a scientific marvel to a peephole through which to look at more than half a century of artistic and cultural history.

Fish-eye | Collater.al

The distorted world seen with the fish-eye
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The distorted world seen with the fish-eye
The distorted world seen with the fish-eye
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Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos

Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

The balance between the human figure and the landscape is the key to Lisa Strautmann‘s shots. Born in 1988, Lisa Strautmann is a German photographer who has had a different path than many of her colleagues. In fact, she has earned no less than two degrees, neither of them in the arts or photography: the first in physical education and the second in psychology. 

Her course of study, however, led her to have the approach she has today to the photographic medium and the subjects she shoots. We almost always see one or more figures in the center of the composition, naked, in unnatural and contrived poses. All around are the colors of nature, from the bright green of the grass to the clear blue of the sky. 

With these images, Lisa Strautmann manages to merge her being an adult, feminist woman with a deep love for nature and the connection humans can make with it. 

Discover more of Lisa Strautmann’s work on her website and Instagram profile

Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Lisa Strautmann
Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos
Photography
Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos
Bodies in the wild in Lisa Strautmann’s photos
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