Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock

Aurora Alma Bartiromo · 2 years ago · Art

Stick and move, stick and move, but above all other super interesting answers from the Outdoor Festival.
Ready? 3,2,1 go!

Tell me five words you love and five you hate.

Uno: Love: ‘Deturnamento’, Simple, Open, Sandwich, Loco. Hate: Deadlock, Fluorine, Retraining, Also (in Italian: Altresì), Closed.

Leonardo Crudi: All the onomatopoeic words. All the “inglesismi”.

Rub Kandy: Love: #crossover #visualize #mood #cat #kids. Hate: #resilience #synergy #immersive #madeinitaly #no.

Biancoshock: I feel positive vibes with words as Phosphorescent, Analogic, Spray, Additive and Picklock. On the other side I don’t love, for different reasons, words like Benzodiazepine, Influencer, Deduction, Beetroot and Urban Renewal.

What is the best thing about the city you came from?

Uno: The sun.

Leonardo Crudi: The eastern bypass of Rome, it’s the place where I spent the most of my time and also the best of my time. 

Rub Kandy: You can find the best Opium in Potenza.

Biancoshock: Variety. Of styles, cultures, urban geometries, disadvantage. This implies differences and possible issues but, in my opinion, the variety is a very important occasion to compare one to each other and taste something new here and there. For the rest Milan is full of lacks and nonsense, sometimes I feel it as a middle-age lady with no intention to grow old. For this reason, for better or for worse, I love here. 

How and When did you start “making art”?

Uno: Since I was a little boy art has always been a part of my life, I spent a lot of time drawing with my father. I began to work in the street during the first years of 2000 and I started to do it serially when the icon of a famous brand of chocolate, well-known for my generation, has been replaced with a more catchy image. From that moment that face has become omnipresent in my artistic production. In those years I was strongly influenced by situationism, the intent was playing with the technique of advertising changing its sign. A face freed from the role assigned from its creators that becomes, paradoxically, the ideal instrument to criticise the advertising technique itself.   

Leonardo Crudi: When I changed my dialectic passing from graffiti (that I’ve never left completely) to painting, I was in my twenties, experimenting shapes and colors to “create” not only letters. All of this in parallel with the fact that I stopped hanging out. 

Rub Kandy: When I was a child, I followed my bigger brother, he’s the real artist and like a real artist is doing something else now…like Duchamp…and then I had some teachers of the kindergarten in Via Messina that were a sort of “hippies”, they made me drawing, then some of them were hanged to the walls and they told me that I was good at it…unfortunately at the elementary school in Via Perugia, with that bitch of teacher Elisabetta, that was a sadistic and frustrated woman, things changed…but the whacks of that dark heart didn’t stop me and there, with Giuseppe Morlino, we were making politicised art…now we can call it satire…well we drew the teacher fat, naked, full of shit and other things like that <3 Sometime after my mum bought the place where the kindergarten was and now it has become my archive in Potenza. Love mom.

Biancoshock: When I was 14-years-old, with graffitis. I don’t know if it was “making art”; for sure it’s “making”, and I still make, it doesn’t matter if this is connected to the word “art”, for me action, interaction and communicative disturbance are – and always will be – in the DNA of my art project. Maybe today my work is recognised (with struggle) as Urban Art. But it’s the surrounding that gives the right meaning to my path: the urban contest where I work, the people who live there, the disadvantage and the nonsense of the society, in other words the scent of all the things that I feel everyday.  

What are you proposing here for the Outdoor Festival?

Uno: My work for the Outdoor will be an installation called “Outside In”. It’s a sort of scenery formed by five big sheets situated at the Festival’s entrance. When I learned the theme of this year, Heritage, I immediately thought about something that could go through the idea of artistic and cultural heritage of our nation. Heritage like something bigger, that has something to do with Italy in full. So I thought about the borders of our earth, the seas and the mountains, and I tried to take them on my work with geometric shapes that could represent both the mountain ranges and the waves. The shapes repeat themselves (even if in a different way) both on the first and on the last sheet, like borders of the installation itself. The drawing at the beginning is a big female reproductive system, the origin of everything, that works like a door that the audience has to pass through to plunge themselves into the work. The middle sheets are divided into three phases: dawn, day and night. 

Leonardo Crudi: Four works, four manifests, that represent the leaders of the Soviet Vanguard of the early 1900’s. In addition to the portraits, in the manifests, there are references to their cultural work and to some episodes of their lives. As with Majakovskij where I represented Lilja Brik’s face, his lover and muse, or as in those of  Ejzenstejn and Vertov where I put the kinoglaz (cineocchio) or the title of one of their masterpieces. Inspired by the logic of  Francis Pacabia’s works where the object describes the person. The manifests’ holder goes back to the urban scenery of the Roman posters (ndr cartellonistica) with some red triangular flags that remind us of the expositions of Lissitzky and other Russian constructivists. 

Rub Kandy: I take here a process, an algorithm, we can say…Di Lullo and Omodeo (the curators) told me about the concept, I have a great relationship with them, they know how much I care about doing things but they also know how important is experimentation for me, sorry for the overrated word…for “experimenting” I mean “approaching to a project being aware of the possibility of a failure”…in other words to play…When they call me they know that will be a struggle and that I’ll end up in some dead-end street but maybe we’ll also be so lucky to make that jump to go out from the hole (when you are with your back to the wall it’s the right time to make a big leap and leave everyone astonished cit.)…All the three of us art historians, so we are the chosen one and we can understand each other with few words .-) Ok, I come back to the description of my work: what I take here is a process, something like a supply chain: 1 recollecting all the styrofoam packaging easy to find in the streets of Rome, in particular around the Mattatoio; 2 dripping concrete (and the crumbled styrofoam instead) inside these empty spaces; 3 enjoying the resulting shapes, fruit of a caring planning, even if not finalised to an aesthetic purpose, and yet, maybe, this is the reason why it’s so “thick” and “full” and “heavy” of “content”…It’s a classic of the handicraft (the mold), of the archaeology (how can we not mention the magic invented by Fiorelli for Pompei’s molds), of the play (sand castles) and, obviously, of the building technologies from the Aurelian Walls’ bricks to the MAXXI’s shuttering (they’d deserve to be exposed at the MAXXI…and maybe they are there, invisible but present as the negative of their shapes…as the Circo Massimo…as the riding club hidden into the void of Piazza Navona, it’s not there…but it’s also there…)…4 putting everything to dry under a beautiful vintage shaper with a 1000W warm light…ensuring that the shadow of one of them doesn’t go in the shadow of another one, every piece needs its place in the sun…applying the rule that the bigger ones have to stay in the center and so on…breaking this rule now and then, on the basis of contingent occasions…as it happens in cities’ stratifications…; 5 the name of the work is “almost ready”, the title tells the mission…almost ready/quasi pronto (in Italian) because is a helped ready-made, it’s an almost ready-made, it’s a pre-finished like the Leroy Merlin parquet, ready for the artist-bricoleur that restructures and remixes…almost ready because the drying time of concrete is as long as the exhibition itself, 30/40 days in which the concrete, friend of the man, dough for grown children, magically calcifies passing to be, from friable soil, brutal stone, with all the content imprisoned in its shape…The fabulous b-side of the industry.

Biancoshock: B.TOY, an installation / performance that tells the nowadays situation, that of the contemporary urban artist, taken-wrapped-and delivered from one place to the other, from an event to a festival, from a commission to a exhibition. Obviously always ready to create the low-cost (but also high-performance) logic. There’s is a form of commercialisation of the street art that has brought to a festivals’ saturation, events promoted by brands, etc. etc. that has denaturalised the origins of this – let’s call it this way – movement. But what will it happen when the kids will get bored of this B.Toy?

What do you see in the future? 

Uno: Everything is a little bit blurry.

Leonardo Crudi: I’m a TV junkie so my very next future is in front of the TV. 

Rub Kandy: I don’t know, I’m in a crisis.

Biancoshock: I see the birth of the Vatican Museum of Street Art, Salvatore Aranzulla Ministry of Defence and the biggest strike of likes announced by Zuckenberg.

Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.alOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al

Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al 57 Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al 56 Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al 55

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock
Art
Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock
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Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan

Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Art

Fernweh is one of those fantastic untranslatable words that often contain a deep meaning. In this case, Fernweh, a German word, means “longing for distance”, that is the feeling that assails us when we want to leave and go as far away from home as possible. 

At least once in our lives, especially in recent months, we have all experienced such a feeling and it is precisely from this overwhelming desire to travel that Denise Rashidi let herself be inspired for her latest work. 

Denise Rashidi is a German illustrator who, during a trip to Japan, was captivated by the beauty of the streets, the particularity of the architecture, so much so that she started drawing them. This is how Daydreaming in Japan was born: A Coloring Book and Travel Adventure, a self-published book with decision makers and dozens of views of Japanese cities and villages to color as you like. 

Obviously, Denise Rashidi also gave her personal interpretation to the illustrations, coloring them with warm, almost neon tones, turning the places into surreal, dreamlike places. 

If you love Japan and have an incredible desire to travel, Daydreaming in Japan: A Coloring Book and Travel Adventure could be your next purchase. 

Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan
Art
Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan
Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan
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“Sneakerhead”, the Netflix series for shoe enthusiasts

“Sneakerhead”, the Netflix series for shoe enthusiasts

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Art

Dear sneakers fans and collectors, Netflix has thought of a series just for you.
Coming out on September 25th, we are talking about “Sneakerhead” a six-episode comic series with Allen Maldonado and Andrew Bachelor, produced by creator Jay Longino.

The protagonist of the series is Devin, a dad with an incredible passion for shoes, but who left the market some time ago. His lifelong friend will convince him to dive into a business deal, definitively awakening his passion.

Waiting for its release, here is the trailer that lasts about two minutes and a half, which in a few hours has made the full consensus counting at the moment over 200,000 views on YouTube.


“Sneakerhead”, the Netflix series for shoe enthusiasts
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“Sneakerhead”, the Netflix series for shoe enthusiasts
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The villa of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” is on Airbnb

The villa of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” is on Airbnb

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Art

It was September 10, 1990, on television a series destined to have a special place in our adolescence “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” made its debut. 30 years after that beautiful first episode that sucked us into the fantastic and colorful world of Willy, the actors organized a reunion with a very special surprise.

For the 30-year commemorative shoot of the sitcom, Smith gathered in the old mansion of Banks Tatyana Ali (Ashley), Karyn Parsons (Hilary), Joseph Marcell (Geoffrey), Daphne Maxwell Reid (Aunt Viv), Alfonso Ribeiro (Carlton) and DJ Jazzy Jeff.

In addition to announcing new episodes on HBOMax, the villa where Will Smith shot the sitcom for six years is on Airbnb.
Starting September 29, five people will have the opportunity to book one of the five stays for two people in a wing of Will’s house, available on October 2, 5, 8, 11 and 14.

Reservations are currently limited to Los Angeles Country residents, the cost per night will be only $30.
And it will be Willy himself to open “that hottie of the house“, inside you will find the same furniture of the series, an exclusive collection of sneakers and clothing of the prince used in the series.

Here is the statement released by Airbnb: “the family residence is as luxurious as it appeared in the TV series. Graffiti art, elegant interiors, timeless family portraits and Philadelphia cheese steak served on silver plates will transport you to the heart of luxury. Uncle and Aunt Banks not included.”

The villa of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” is on Airbnb
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Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows

Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Art

The first time we talked about Alex Senna we focused on the romantic aspect of his works. Now, almost 3 years later, we return to focus on the Brazilian street artist‘s work, paying attention to another aspect of his artwork that has become more and more frequent. 

Since he started, Alex Senna has been filling the cities of the world, from Brazil to Italy, from the United States to Hong Kong, with his murals depicting simple black and white characters, a stylistic choice due to the artist’s colorblindness.

These figures are represented in their everyday life and, like everyone on the street, they too walk, look around, push a bicycle or wait to cross. What makes Alex Senna’s characters out of the ordinary is the point of view, each of them is depicted seen from above, or slightly biased, and to complete the mural their shadow comes overwhelmingly. 

It is precisely the latter that never seems to be missing in Alex’s work and that gives the images a melancholic air: a woman walks dragging her black and dark shadow as if it were a burden to carry around, as if she were hiding all her thoughts and worries. Everyone is free to see in Alex Serra’s shadows what he wants, what makes him happy or sad, carefree or worried. 

Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows
Art
Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows
Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows
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