Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock

Aurora Alma Bartiromo · 2 years ago · Art

Stick and move, stick and move, but above all other super interesting answers from the Outdoor Festival.
Ready? 3,2,1 go!

Tell me five words you love and five you hate.

Uno: Love: ‘Deturnamento’, Simple, Open, Sandwich, Loco. Hate: Deadlock, Fluorine, Retraining, Also (in Italian: Altresì), Closed.

Leonardo Crudi: All the onomatopoeic words. All the “inglesismi”.

Rub Kandy: Love: #crossover #visualize #mood #cat #kids. Hate: #resilience #synergy #immersive #madeinitaly #no.

Biancoshock: I feel positive vibes with words as Phosphorescent, Analogic, Spray, Additive and Picklock. On the other side I don’t love, for different reasons, words like Benzodiazepine, Influencer, Deduction, Beetroot and Urban Renewal.

What is the best thing about the city you came from?

Uno: The sun.

Leonardo Crudi: The eastern bypass of Rome, it’s the place where I spent the most of my time and also the best of my time. 

Rub Kandy: You can find the best Opium in Potenza.

Biancoshock: Variety. Of styles, cultures, urban geometries, disadvantage. This implies differences and possible issues but, in my opinion, the variety is a very important occasion to compare one to each other and taste something new here and there. For the rest Milan is full of lacks and nonsense, sometimes I feel it as a middle-age lady with no intention to grow old. For this reason, for better or for worse, I love here. 

How and When did you start “making art”?

Uno: Since I was a little boy art has always been a part of my life, I spent a lot of time drawing with my father. I began to work in the street during the first years of 2000 and I started to do it serially when the icon of a famous brand of chocolate, well-known for my generation, has been replaced with a more catchy image. From that moment that face has become omnipresent in my artistic production. In those years I was strongly influenced by situationism, the intent was playing with the technique of advertising changing its sign. A face freed from the role assigned from its creators that becomes, paradoxically, the ideal instrument to criticise the advertising technique itself.   

Leonardo Crudi: When I changed my dialectic passing from graffiti (that I’ve never left completely) to painting, I was in my twenties, experimenting shapes and colors to “create” not only letters. All of this in parallel with the fact that I stopped hanging out. 

Rub Kandy: When I was a child, I followed my bigger brother, he’s the real artist and like a real artist is doing something else now…like Duchamp…and then I had some teachers of the kindergarten in Via Messina that were a sort of “hippies”, they made me drawing, then some of them were hanged to the walls and they told me that I was good at it…unfortunately at the elementary school in Via Perugia, with that bitch of teacher Elisabetta, that was a sadistic and frustrated woman, things changed…but the whacks of that dark heart didn’t stop me and there, with Giuseppe Morlino, we were making politicised art…now we can call it satire…well we drew the teacher fat, naked, full of shit and other things like that <3 Sometime after my mum bought the place where the kindergarten was and now it has become my archive in Potenza. Love mom.

Biancoshock: When I was 14-years-old, with graffitis. I don’t know if it was “making art”; for sure it’s “making”, and I still make, it doesn’t matter if this is connected to the word “art”, for me action, interaction and communicative disturbance are – and always will be – in the DNA of my art project. Maybe today my work is recognised (with struggle) as Urban Art. But it’s the surrounding that gives the right meaning to my path: the urban contest where I work, the people who live there, the disadvantage and the nonsense of the society, in other words the scent of all the things that I feel everyday.  

What are you proposing here for the Outdoor Festival?

Uno: My work for the Outdoor will be an installation called “Outside In”. It’s a sort of scenery formed by five big sheets situated at the Festival’s entrance. When I learned the theme of this year, Heritage, I immediately thought about something that could go through the idea of artistic and cultural heritage of our nation. Heritage like something bigger, that has something to do with Italy in full. So I thought about the borders of our earth, the seas and the mountains, and I tried to take them on my work with geometric shapes that could represent both the mountain ranges and the waves. The shapes repeat themselves (even if in a different way) both on the first and on the last sheet, like borders of the installation itself. The drawing at the beginning is a big female reproductive system, the origin of everything, that works like a door that the audience has to pass through to plunge themselves into the work. The middle sheets are divided into three phases: dawn, day and night. 

Leonardo Crudi: Four works, four manifests, that represent the leaders of the Soviet Vanguard of the early 1900’s. In addition to the portraits, in the manifests, there are references to their cultural work and to some episodes of their lives. As with Majakovskij where I represented Lilja Brik’s face, his lover and muse, or as in those of  Ejzenstejn and Vertov where I put the kinoglaz (cineocchio) or the title of one of their masterpieces. Inspired by the logic of  Francis Pacabia’s works where the object describes the person. The manifests’ holder goes back to the urban scenery of the Roman posters (ndr cartellonistica) with some red triangular flags that remind us of the expositions of Lissitzky and other Russian constructivists. 

Rub Kandy: I take here a process, an algorithm, we can say…Di Lullo and Omodeo (the curators) told me about the concept, I have a great relationship with them, they know how much I care about doing things but they also know how important is experimentation for me, sorry for the overrated word…for “experimenting” I mean “approaching to a project being aware of the possibility of a failure”…in other words to play…When they call me they know that will be a struggle and that I’ll end up in some dead-end street but maybe we’ll also be so lucky to make that jump to go out from the hole (when you are with your back to the wall it’s the right time to make a big leap and leave everyone astonished cit.)…All the three of us art historians, so we are the chosen one and we can understand each other with few words .-) Ok, I come back to the description of my work: what I take here is a process, something like a supply chain: 1 recollecting all the styrofoam packaging easy to find in the streets of Rome, in particular around the Mattatoio; 2 dripping concrete (and the crumbled styrofoam instead) inside these empty spaces; 3 enjoying the resulting shapes, fruit of a caring planning, even if not finalised to an aesthetic purpose, and yet, maybe, this is the reason why it’s so “thick” and “full” and “heavy” of “content”…It’s a classic of the handicraft (the mold), of the archaeology (how can we not mention the magic invented by Fiorelli for Pompei’s molds), of the play (sand castles) and, obviously, of the building technologies from the Aurelian Walls’ bricks to the MAXXI’s shuttering (they’d deserve to be exposed at the MAXXI…and maybe they are there, invisible but present as the negative of their shapes…as the Circo Massimo…as the riding club hidden into the void of Piazza Navona, it’s not there…but it’s also there…)…4 putting everything to dry under a beautiful vintage shaper with a 1000W warm light…ensuring that the shadow of one of them doesn’t go in the shadow of another one, every piece needs its place in the sun…applying the rule that the bigger ones have to stay in the center and so on…breaking this rule now and then, on the basis of contingent occasions…as it happens in cities’ stratifications…; 5 the name of the work is “almost ready”, the title tells the mission…almost ready/quasi pronto (in Italian) because is a helped ready-made, it’s an almost ready-made, it’s a pre-finished like the Leroy Merlin parquet, ready for the artist-bricoleur that restructures and remixes…almost ready because the drying time of concrete is as long as the exhibition itself, 30/40 days in which the concrete, friend of the man, dough for grown children, magically calcifies passing to be, from friable soil, brutal stone, with all the content imprisoned in its shape…The fabulous b-side of the industry.

Biancoshock: B.TOY, an installation / performance that tells the nowadays situation, that of the contemporary urban artist, taken-wrapped-and delivered from one place to the other, from an event to a festival, from a commission to a exhibition. Obviously always ready to create the low-cost (but also high-performance) logic. There’s is a form of commercialisation of the street art that has brought to a festivals’ saturation, events promoted by brands, etc. etc. that has denaturalised the origins of this – let’s call it this way – movement. But what will it happen when the kids will get bored of this B.Toy?

What do you see in the future? 

Uno: Everything is a little bit blurry.

Leonardo Crudi: I’m a TV junkie so my very next future is in front of the TV. 

Rub Kandy: I don’t know, I’m in a crisis.

Biancoshock: I see the birth of the Vatican Museum of Street Art, Salvatore Aranzulla Ministry of Defence and the biggest strike of likes announced by Zuckenberg.

Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi e Rub Kandy | Collater.alOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy e Biancoshock | Collater.al

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Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Uno, Leonardo Crudi, Rub Kandy and Biancoshock
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We race comic, the first webcomic signed by Scuderia Ferrari

We race comic, the first webcomic signed by Scuderia Ferrari

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art, Style

Scuderia Ferrari, with the collaboration of cartoonist Riccardo Burchielli and writer and screenwriter Giulio Antonio Gualtieri, presents We Race, the first webcomic in which the heroes are the pilots and their motoring exploits the battlefield.
A totally new webcomic that has nothing to envy to those we are accustomed to reading, where the risk, speed and challenges of a young pilot come to life in a universe suspended in the future, where a land destroyed by an unexpected geological event must deal with the danger of extinction.

The webcomic, that you can find entirely on the site at high volume, is divided into 4 chapters, one more engaging than the other, which, without too much effort, remind us to how certain passions, certain emotions and certain heroes go through entire eras without cease to amaze.

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Short video for Breakfast – Ama, the fascinating underwater dance of Julie Gautier

Short video for Breakfast – Ama, the fascinating underwater dance of Julie Gautier

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art

Japanese traditions have always been a source of inspiration for artists of all kinds.
Their meaning often becomes the starting point for fascinating projects, characterized by an ethereal and delicate beauty.

The concept of ama, 海女, which literally means sea maiden, is just the latest example of how a tradition that has been living for 2000 years can push young artists to reinterpret its meaning.
Ama, in fact, is precisely the name of an exciting video in which the French sea diver and filmmaker Julie Gautier, plays and dances as if she were an “ama”, one of those Japanese women who just search for pearls in the sea.

A short naked video, which begins with a heavy rain and ends with an elegant and suffering dance inside a deep swimming pool.

Ama, affascinate danza subacquea di Julie Gautier | Collater.al 2 Ama, affascinate danza subacquea di Julie Gautier | Collater.al 1 Ama, affascinate danza subacquea di Julie Gautier | Collater.al 3 Ama, affascinate danza subacquea di Julie Gautier | Collater.al 4

Short video for Breakfast – Ama, the fascinating underwater dance of Julie Gautier
Art
Short video for Breakfast – Ama, the fascinating underwater dance of Julie Gautier
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The shocking trailer of the House that Jack Built

The shocking trailer of the House that Jack Built

Andrea Jean Varraud · 2 years ago · Art

The House That Jack Built is the new film directed by Lars Von Trier which was recently seen, thou not competing, on Cannes’ screens. The movie analyses the labyrinthine and deviated mind of a serial killer. It’s a story quite similar to the film Angst, directed by Gerald Kargl which, released in the 1980’s, affected a number of directors of the time such as Gaspar Noè.

The film was met with a wave of criticism from the audience during its premiere: this movie is violent, sick and psycho. In fact, a good part of the audience left the movie theatre before the end of the film. Such a reaction is in our opinion nonsensical. What should people, in fact, expect from a Lars Von Trier’s work? What’s new? Having the man repeatedly shocked the public with movies teeming with psychological and physical violence.

In The House that Jack built has a great cast, Matt Dillon is the killer while Uma Thurman and Bruno Gantz’s roles are not quite clear from the trailer’s preview.

Il disturbante trailer di the House that Jack Built | Collater.al 1

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Madeleine Gross’ abstract reality

Madeleine Gross’ abstract reality

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art

Toronto-based mixed media artist Madeleine Gross is inspired by everyday life, nature and the people around her.

A woman who sunbaths, one who looks out the window, one who admires the sunset, one who laughs, are, for her, starting points to create new stories.
Her stories are large brushstrokes of colors, chosen according to the mood to communicate, which add to reality an abstract touch, a different way of seeing and perceiving the existing, emphasizing it and without destroying it.

Her artworks, from simple photographs, become so tangible, an elegant mix of reality and narration.

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