Rebekah Campbell’s shots immortalize femininity

Rebekah Campbell’s shots immortalize femininity

Giulia Guido · 8 months ago · Photography

Many times, an artist puts at the center of his or her aesthetic research a world or subject he or she knows very well. This is the case of Rebekah Campbell, a young American photographer, originally from Oklahoma, but now living and working in New York, who has made herself known thanks to her shots full of sensuality and femininity. 

In fact, the subjects Rebekah prefers are young women but succeeding in going beyond the concrete beauty of the body. Her shots manage to dig deeper, revealing the most hidden, most intimate, truest side of femininity.

We see photographs covered in a thin veil of melancholy, nostalgic, almost dreamy, which led Rebekah Campbell to collaborate for some of the major magazines such as Elle Uk, Vogue Mexico and L’Oficiel.

Discover Rebekah’s shots in our gallery and on her Instagram profile

Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al 2
Rebekah Campbell | Collater.al
Rebekah Campbell’s shots immortalize femininity
Photography
Rebekah Campbell’s shots immortalize femininity
Rebekah Campbell’s shots immortalize femininity
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181°, conceptual photographs by Yoshiki Hase

181°, conceptual photographs by Yoshiki Hase

Claudia Fuggetti · 7 months ago · Photography

Yoshiki Hase is a photographer from Kawasaki, who currently resides in Tokyo. The artist has won several international awards and has made himself known for his original style within the circuit of conceptual photography. His project 181°, represents land art installations conceived as enigmatic geometric objects.

As the artist explains:

“By placing objects into these physical spaces, the onlooker intermittently experiences peculiar instances of visual harmony”.

It is not possible to identify the places that Yoshiki portrays, but a completely new scenario emerges from the cross-section of “will and nature”. The name 181° derives from the fact that usually 180° rapresent the horizon free from obstacles: adding only the number 1 creates a sense of bewilderment, it defines a sort of anomaly.

Explore Yoshiki’s website if you want to know more.

181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, le fotografie concettuali di Yoshiki Hase | Collater.al
181°, conceptual photographs by Yoshiki Hase
Photography
181°, conceptual photographs by Yoshiki Hase
181°, conceptual photographs by Yoshiki Hase
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The crazy aesthetics by photographer Viacheslav Poliakov

The crazy aesthetics by photographer Viacheslav Poliakov

Claudia Fuggetti · 7 months ago · Photography

Viacheslav Poliakov is a Ukrainian photographer interested in public spaces in small provincial towns, the artist seems to have a real obsession with bizarre objects and structures. As he himself says:

“There may be an abandoned Soviet factory used as a pasture next to the medieval castle turned into a warehouse, which in turn will be surrounded by a market made of shiny and colorful plastic, with a golden church on the left and an empty area made of mud and puddles on the right”.

The area’s complex historical and cultural past, made up of outdated laws, bureaucracy and mafia infiltration by administrations, has overshadowed the repair of Soviet buildings and infrastructure, leading citizens to do everything possible to improve the condition of their streets and gardens. The result is total chaos, which inspires and amuses Viacheslav.

“A naive visual subculture involving public space has spread throughout Ukraine since the fall of the Soviet Union and the subsequent expansion of globalization”.

So in the artist’s shots we find ourselves in front of unicorns sculptures made with old tires and pieces of a fence: in short, it is the creativity of ordinary people that this series aims to capture.

What seems to be born by mistake, becomes the main attraction, the favorite subject of the artist, who through chaos puts order, giving the public a new key to interpreting reality.

The crazy aesthetics by photographer Viacheslav Poliakov
Photography
The crazy aesthetics by photographer Viacheslav Poliakov
The crazy aesthetics by photographer Viacheslav Poliakov
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Salento death valley, a project by Gabriele Albergo

Salento death valley, a project by Gabriele Albergo

Claudia Fuggetti · 7 months ago · Photography

Salento death valley was born for fun, it’s not a real project, it’s the name that the photographer Gabriele Albergo uses on Instagram. The word Death Valley contains an attitude and cultural and artistic references to American landscape photography and to the cinema of directors such as David Linch or the Cohen brothers.

His gaze was also influenced by the Italian cinema of the 70s and by neo-realism. Gabriele also combined a subtitle with his work, which he explains:

“The subtitle is a black diary of the most beloved Italian peninsula, a dark diary of the brightest peninsula most loved by Italians”.

His project contains remarkable aesthetic care that enhances the narrative of the landscape, marked by suggestive and significant scenes. Gabriele’s story of Salento differs from the purely classical or touristic imaginary, to show the public imaginary that wants to reinterpret the tradition and history of this territory:

“I’m often sarcastic and cynical towards what Salento is now, I don’t like the way it has taken shape, we were the periphery of the periphery, but in time we have become one of the most visited and coveted places in the world while retaining what wasour worst characteristics”.

Considering that we had to show only the best part, which is not even our work, but nature and everything else has been hidden, Gabriele goes in search of what has been removed because he believes that there is a need to bring it back to the surface and urgently reckon with it.

Follow Gabriele on his Instagram profile, which you will find here.

Salento death valley, il progetto di Gabriele Albergo | Collater.al 1
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Salento death valley è il nome del progetto fotografico di Gabiele Albergo che racconta un'altra faccia del Salento. Scopri adesso di che si tratta!
Salento death valley, a project by Gabriele Albergo
Photography
Salento death valley, a project by Gabriele Albergo
Salento death valley, a project by Gabriele Albergo
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The church becomes modern in the project “Sacred Spaces”

The church becomes modern in the project “Sacred Spaces”

Giulia Guido · 7 months ago · Photography

In the common imagination, sacred places, churches, are always connected to something old, ancient, that survives the passage of time, that was before us and that will resist once we are gone. The photographic project Sacred Spaces by the French photographer Thibaud Poirier dispels this common thought. 

At the heart of the photographic research of the latter project are, in fact, the modern churches of Europe, those that have lost both the exterior and interior appearance of the classical ones, but that are still places that continue to give us the feeling that there is something greater than us. 

Looking at the shots of Sacred Spaces it will be natural to compare one to the other, the stylistic scene makes it easier, indeed, imposes it. All the churches are shot from the same point of view, which allows you to show in one shot only the entire environment. 

Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
Sacred Spaces | Collater.al
The church becomes modern in the project “Sacred Spaces”
Photography
The church becomes modern in the project “Sacred Spaces”
The church becomes modern in the project “Sacred Spaces”
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