Anthropoceano, the anti-smog mural at Lambrate

Anthropoceano, the anti-smog mural at Lambrate

Collater.al Contributors · 4 weeks ago · Art

A few days ago in Milan – in the Lambrate area – Anthropoceano appeared, a mural on the wall of a building in Via Viotti in front of the train station created by Iena Cruz, a Milanese street artist. This is a marine theme and combines art, sustainability, and awareness of one of the most current environmental emergencies: the pollution of the seas caused by plastic. The concept is to create a work that has as its main objective to make people reflect on the scars left by man on the seabed and on the surface of the ocean.

The peculiarity of this work is the technique with which it was created as the artist decided to create an anti-smog mural. This is made possible by the use of special paint, called Airlite, which reduces by 88% the presence of nitrogen dioxide in the air, an innovative technology capable of eliminating pollutants through natural and artificial light. Painting has the task of absorbing the pollution of the city in an artistic way. This has made the wall of the building a sort of natural purifier whose effectiveness is equal to the action of about 330 square meters covered by tall trees.

The realization of this mural is part of the project No Plastic More Fun conceived and carried out by Worldrise, a non-profit organization that sponsors sustainable solutions for large urban centers, with the support of the Ocean Family Foundation and the collaboration of North Sails. North Sails has long been active in tackling the problem of disposable plastics by creating a network of venues that have decided not to serve any type of disposable plastic product.

In the middle of Anthropoceano, there is an oil platform, whose chimney follows the profile of a plastic container that traps the marine ecosystem.
In a period like this, where the environmental struggle is more alive than ever, the work wants to creatively retrace the path that plastic accomplishes: from its origin to the environmental impact that comes with it. At the same time, depicting some of the most threatened marine animals, the mural invites people to reflect on all the issues related to the exploitation of natural resources such as overfishing and poaching of which sharks and whales are victims.

Anthropoceano | Collater.al 6
Anthropoceano | Collater.al 6
Anthropoceano | Collater.al 6
Anthropoceano | Collater.al 6
Anthropoceano | Collater.al 6
Anthropoceano | Collater.al 6
Anthropoceano | Collater.al 5

Text by Anna Cardaci

Anthropoceano, the anti-smog mural at Lambrate
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Anthropoceano, the anti-smog mural at Lambrate
Anthropoceano, the anti-smog mural at Lambrate
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Pop culture and humor in Yonatan Popper’s illustrations

Pop culture and humor in Yonatan Popper’s illustrations

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

Mark Zuckerberg dressed as a Roman emperor, complete with a laurel wreath, side on the throne showing his thumbs down. Neil Armstrong in his astronaut’s suit is sipping a drink, sitting behind a camera, before filming the moon landing moment. 
Yonatan Popper‘s images manage to enclose messages and meanings with a strong impact. 

Yonatan is an illustrator and animator from Israel, where he studied at Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, which has seen his works published on heads such as The New Yorker, San Antonio Magazine, The Guardian, Blazer magazine, Globes magazine, Liberal-magazine, and many others. His illustrations have the power to enclose an ironic side, very subtle but essential, and a more satirical, edgy. 

Yonatan Popper takes his cue from everything around him, from comics, silkscreens, futuristic posters, but also from what he sees on the internet, from films and TV series, from pop culture and events related to current affairs. Once he has understood what to illustrate and how to illustrate it, the Israeli artist begins to work with paper and pencil; only later does he scan the sketch and complete the work digitally. It is at this stage that he calibrates the colors, using them to highlight the main subject so that he can immediately capture our attention. 

Discover a selection of works by Yonatan Popper in our gallery! 

Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Yonatan Popper | Collater.al 1
Pop culture and humor in Yonatan Popper’s illustrations
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Pop culture and humor in Yonatan Popper’s illustrations
Pop culture and humor in Yonatan Popper’s illustrations
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KFC and the Christmas commercials against the turkey

KFC and the Christmas commercials against the turkey

Collater.al Contributors · 4 weeks ago · Art

The American fast-food chain KFC, specialized in the production and sale of fried chicken, has launched a few days ago the new Christmas campaign consisting of short films in which are told all the inconveniences that may arise during the cooking of the typical Christmas dish: the turkey.
The creative campaign has been curated by the London agency Mother London in collaboration with the animation studio Golden Wolf and Stink who have contributed to the creation of five mini spots lasting about ten seconds each.
Inside these commercials, all the hyperbolic situations and inconveniences that can happen during the preparation of the Christmas dinner are told and emphasized to the extreme, in an ironic way.
For example, a man who tries to thaw the turkey shatters it into many pieces or a woman who while handling a “greasy” turkey loses control and makes it fly in space. Each commercial ends with the claim “Good luck on the 25th. Until then, we have you”, as if to say that until that moment, if by chance something goes wrong, you can go to the fast-food to eat chicken (especially on Christmas day).

Each short takes care of every stage of turkey preparation, from thawing to stuffing, to cooking in an oven that is too small to hold, to the moment you realize that you failed to cook the highlight of the meal and it was burned.
This advertising campaign is supported by social media activities promoting the seasonal supply of fast food including Christmas Burger & Bucket.

Last year, also in the run-up to Christmas, KFC launched a Western-style advertising campaign in which it showed a turkey and a chicken facing each other in a duel.

Text by Anna Cardaci

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Portal Series, the endless icosahedrons by Anthony James

Portal Series, the endless icosahedrons by Anthony James

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

In Plato’s Timeo you can find for the first time a careful description of how the 4 elements: Fire, Earth, Air, and Water are found in nature and their geometric correspondent. In fact, according to the philosopher, each element can be associated with a shape, to a “Platonic solid”. One of these is the icosahedron, a geometric figure formed by 20 triangular faces which, according to Plato’s theories, can be connected to Water and shows perfect harmony. 

For these characteristics, the Los Angeles artist Anthony James has chosen the icosahedron as the main object of his art, his artistic research and his most famous series of works entitled Portal Series. So, for more than ten years, Anthony has been making these perfect polygons using materials such as titanium, LED lights and special glass, which embody and represent Platonic thought in a clear and amazing way. 

If from a distance you have the sensation of looking at a finished sculpture, as you approach it, you will notice that the play of mirrors that are reflected in each other gives life to an infinite space: modern materials exhibited in contemporary art galleries embody ideas and theories thousands of years old. 

Despite the passage of time, Anthony James’s production of sculptures seems to have no intention of stopping and his latest series you can see it in the exhibition Crystals in Art at the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, where it will be on display until January 2020.

Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Anthony James Portal Series | Collater.al
Portal Series, the endless icosahedrons by Anthony James
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Portal Series, the endless icosahedrons by Anthony James
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Morley, the ironic side of street art that makes you think

Morley, the ironic side of street art that makes you think

Claudia Fuggetti · 4 weeks ago · Art

Morley is a street artist from Los Angeles characterized by marked humor, mixed with a feeling of hope for the future. Morley specializes in bold, typographic posters that he places in the urban landscape.

His works have been published in The LA Times, The Huffington Post, Fast Company, LA Magazine and on television networks such as ABC, CBS, Netflix, Comedy Central and Showtime. He has made himself known to the public with his books “If You’re Reading This, There’s Still Time” and “Let’s Burn This Moment Down to the Filter” and has exhibited in galleries around the world and lectured at numerous universities.

Morley’s images are actually lyrics written in cubic characters that immediately attract the attention of those who happen to be looking at them, being intrigued and surprised. Behind Morley’s irony are small-big truths that tend to make us think.

Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, il lato ironico della street art che fa riflettere | Collater.al
Morley, the ironic side of street art that makes you think
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Morley, the ironic side of street art that makes you think
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