JR enters a prison and turns it into a work of art

JR enters a prison and turns it into a work of art

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

It all started some time ago when JR received a call from a friend to do a work in a prison. The artist, who has always been fascinated by these places, began to analyze the plants and shapes of the courtyards of Californian prisons, eventually choosing Tehachapi’s maximum-security prison

At this point the protagonists of the work could only be the prisoners themselves, their families and the prison staff who, in addition to having JR photograph them and helping them in the preparation of the work, opened with the artist by telling their stories, their paths of redemption. 

Thus, the creation of a work of art has become something deeper, something more important: it has become the pretext both to analyze the condition of these men, many of whom were imprisoned in adolescence, and to show how the visit of an artist inside a prison becomes an exceptional event that has the strength to change everyone.  

On his profile Instagram JR tells: 

“I was asked not to approach the guys too closely because they are not comfortable with interactions but when I got in, I couldn’t refrain from looking at them in the eyes, shaking their hands, introducing myself and asking their names. Just because that’s what humans do. They were amazingly grateful for this.”

During the creation of the piece, the same artist realized that something bigger was taking shape, so before unveiling the finished work was created the app JR:murals – downloadable for iOs and Android – where it was possible to give the right space to the stories of the inmates. 

With this work, JR asks us a question: “Can a man change?“, and invites us to reflect well before answering, thinking “Did I change? Did I make mistakes, apologize and amend? If I did, why couldn’t they?

JR | Collater.al
JR | Collater.al
JR | Collater.al

JR enters a prison and turns it into a work of art
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Right Runner, a game about children’s rights

Right Runner, a game about children’s rights

Collater.al Contributors · 4 weeks ago · Art

Today, November 20, is World Children’s Day and many associations and brands have been active to raise awareness about this topic through advertising campaigns, donations, games and more.

30 years after the United Nations approved and recognized children’s civil, social, political, cultural and economic rights, UNICEF decided to contribute by creating Right Runner. This is a game created in collaboration with Nexus, an international studio based in London and Los Angeles, and was designed to inspire, inform and empower children about their rights.

The animated world within the game and its characters were created in particular by the directors Nexus Jack Cunningham and Felix Massie.
Right Runner is composed of five levels to be overcome that are equivalent to the five fundamental rights that every child has from birth: the right to play, learn, live in a clean and safe environment, free from violence and to be heard.

Nexus and Unicef worked with a group of young illustrators to draw the details of the game, inspired by the regions, the social situations in different parts of the world. It explores environments inspired by Latin America and the Caribbean, from historic centers to dark cities, to island communities; it explores a rich and varied landscape, with each area boasting breathtaking graphics and intuitive gameplay.
The Temple Run-style game invites users to claim and defend their rights by overcoming barriers. These are based on real threats that less fortunate children face every day in South America. The goal is to collect the megaphones to spread the word and overcome the level and, after overcoming them all, you get to the last where the characters go up a mountain, a little ‘symbol of the strenuous struggle for rights, where they must use their voice to be heard.

Right Runner can be downloaded for free on Google Play and on Apple Store.

Right Runner | Collater.al 2
Right Runner | Collater.al 2
Right Runner | Collater.al 2
Right Runner | Collater.al 2
Right Runner | Collater.al 2

Text by Anna Cardaci

Right Runner, a game about children’s rights
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Right Runner, a game about children’s rights
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Estonia, wooden megaphones amplify nature

Estonia, wooden megaphones amplify nature

Collater.al Contributors · 3 weeks ago · Art

In Estonia, forests are considered an invaluable asset as they cover about 45% of the territory and constitute its main natural resource. This is why, some years ago, the architecture students of the Academy of Fine Arts designed and built three megaphones with essential and conical shapes and a diameter of about three meters. These were placed in the Pähni Nature Centre, a forest located on the border with Lithuania. The megaphones are entirely made of wood and were built to amplify the sounds of nature and also to be used as recreational spaces. The forest was then transformed into a place of meditation, listening, and relaxation.

These three facilities, called “ruup” in their mother tongue, offer a place for reading and resting and can be used as a potential refuge for visitors and passing hikers, but also as a place where you can take outdoor lessons, hold small events and concerts.
It is precisely this form that supports the spread of sounds: in fact, the three structures are perfectly integrated between the trees and were created to act as a sounding board for the rustle of the leaves, the chirping of birds, the natural sounds. It is a place to discover nature and experience it at its best thanks to listening to and reading the forest through sound.
The silence that surrounds the cones leads those who stop there to listen to their thoughts. A unique experience, a way to get in tune with the landscape and its “acoustic” identity, almost completely unknown to us. The pollution created by the looming noise of our cities prevents us from fully understanding the natural sound of the Earth. In this magical place, it is possible to reconnect with that music.

Megafoni di legno | Collater.al 2
Megafoni di legno | Collater.al 2
Megafoni di legno | Collater.al 2
Megafoni di legno | Collater.al 2

Text by Anna Cardaci

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Jiaqi Wang illustrates daily life

Jiaqi Wang illustrates daily life

Giulia Guido · 3 weeks ago · Art

Jiaqi Wang was born in China and her unbridled passion for illustration led her to travel far and wide, from Italy where she did her first internship, to Los Angeles where she now lives and works. Within the immense field of drawing, the Chinese artist is able to range from 2D illustration to moving illustration, up to motion graphics. 

All her works, both for clients such as Starbucks, Targets or Muji, and personal, are characterized by the ability to capture the ordinary, all those moments that we often live superimposed, without giving us too much importance. 

Jiaqi Wang’s drawings have the strength to show the viewer how much beauty the ordinary moments contain, such as queuing up, having a coffee or listening to music. 

If everyday life inspires her subjects, the places where she lived influence her choice of colors, for example when Jiaqi Wang was in Italy her illustrations were characterized by bright and clear colors, while once she arrived in Los Angeles they started to be much more similar to the real ones. 

Discover a selection of her illustrations in our gallery!  

Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang | Collater.al
Jiaqi Wang illustrates daily life
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Jiaqi Wang illustrates daily life
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Holding Onto What Will, the last mural by Scott Albrecht

Holding Onto What Will, the last mural by Scott Albrecht

Collater.al Contributors · 3 weeks ago · Art

New York artist Scott Albrecht has created a mega painting on the wall of a building in Brooklyn: Holding Onto What Will.
Scott is known in the field for this kind of murals that he has proposed in several American cities including Los Angeles and Philadelphia.
His works are inspired by the continuous observation of what surrounds him and everything that can strike him. He uses his work as an opportunity to reflect and preserve this kind of art. Much of his approach is related to typography as the artist tends to look for ways to deconstruct letterforms to explore a message through a more visual and concrete language. The silhouettes and relationships within each work are created according to the messages and characters below. Scott, through his works, wants to move the viewer from the simple reading and interpretation of words to a more complex experience. This must create a deep connection to the idea behind it through a more tangible language both in form and colors.

Through his latest work called Holding Onto What Will, the artist has tried to offer the user a sense of positive feeling and a reminder of optimism in the most difficult moments. If the work is looked at closely enough, it is possible to decipher both the letters of the title that Scott has abstractly arranged in a staggered grid and his signature style. The mural created in Brooklyn is almost a quarter block long and is Albrecht’s first permanent project in New York. This is very important to him because it’s a very complex work done in his hometown.

For those who are unable to come and see the work live, the artist is preparing works on wood and paper that he will exhibit for his solo exhibition next July at the Hashimoto Contemporary in the Lower East Side.

Scott Albrecht | Collateral1
Scott Albrecht | Collateral1
Scott Albrecht | Collateral4
Scott Albrecht | Collateral1

Text by Anna Cardaci

Holding Onto What Will, the last mural by Scott Albrecht
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