The new “extraterrestrial” project by ASICS and Brain Dead

The new “extraterrestrial” project by ASICS and Brain Dead

Andrea Tuzio · 1 week ago · Style

We have learned to expect everything from Brain Dead and its collaborations.
Thanks to its unconventional aesthetics, with graphics that mix surreal elements with others extremely real, the brand founded and led by Kyle Ng has imposed itself on the streetwear scene in a disruptive way.

Another example of Brain Dead’s impact is its latest collaboration with ASICS.
A team-up featuring the TRABUCO MAX, a chunky trail running silhouette distinguished by comfort and performance.

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da BRAIN DEAD (@wearebraindead)

Brain Dead revised the ASICS sneaker in its own way, which takes on the name TRABUCO MAX “BD Chaos Slime”, giving it a more distinctive look than the original version.

Constructed with an upper featuring an all-over texture that evokes the “extraterrestrial” theme – as well as campaign imagery – thanks in part to the green palette, the ASICS TRABUCO MAX “BD Chaos Slime” counts FLYTEFOAM and GUIDESOLE technologies.

We see purple details on the toe and lining, contrasting with slime green laces and a dark red ASICS logo. Closing the design of the sneaker we find an aggressive pattern on the outsole.

The global release of the ASICS TRABUCO MAX “BD Chaos Slime” is officially scheduled for October 30 via the Brain Dead website.

The new “extraterrestrial” project by ASICS and Brain Dead
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The new “extraterrestrial” project by ASICS and Brain Dead
The new “extraterrestrial” project by ASICS and Brain Dead
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Craft and recycling, Jessica Ogden x A.P.C.

Craft and recycling, Jessica Ogden x A.P.C.

Andrea Tuzio · 1 week ago · Style

Jessica Ogden and A.P.C. presented the Quilts “Round 20” collection, a series of quilts and pillows characterized by zig-zag patterns and the use of different colors, textures and fabrics that fit perfectly with the proposed designs.

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da A.P.C. (@apc_paris)

Creative director and founder of A.P.C. Jean Touitou, chose to name each piece in this collection after a name mentioned within the songs of Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground.

Specifically, for this “Round 20” we celebrate one of the American singer-songwriter’s most famous and influential singles, the 1972 track “Walk on the Wild Side“, by borrowing 3 names mentioned within the song: “Holly”, “Sugar Plum Fairy” and “Jackie”.

For this collaboration, the Jamaican-born designer went back to the basics of quilting, thanks to the use of the zigzag technique on all models. A traditional composition that Ogden calls “obvious classics”, using the expression coined by fashion stylist and Art Director Suzanne Koller, to describe the intercalino collection of A.P.C.

Jessica Ogden studied at the Rhode Island School of Design in the United States and at the Byam Shaw School of Art in London. Ogden is fascinated by old and worn fabrics. A pioneer of salvage and with a strong focus on craftsmanship, her creations showcase the typical elements of layering, hand printing and stitching. Her design is a matter of alchemy, she treats the fabrics she chooses with paints, needles, cheese graters, hammers and nailers.

The campaign was shot by Venezuelan but Paris-based photographer, Alfredo Piola in the northern region of Corsica characterized by a great variety of landscapes.

Below you can take a look at the campaign while Jessica Ogden’s “Round 20” collection is available on A.P.C’s website.

Craft and recycling, Jessica Ogden x A.P.C.
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Craft and recycling, Jessica Ogden x A.P.C.
Craft and recycling, Jessica Ogden x A.P.C.
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The Story of “Flora”, Gucci’s Timeless Scarf

The Story of “Flora”, Gucci’s Timeless Scarf

Andrea Tuzio · 7 days ago · Style

Gucci has recently launched “Gucci 100”, the collection inspired by the centenary history (1921-2021) of the Italian fashion house accompanied by a video that you can watch just below.

A true celebration of the immense legacy Gucci has left in these 100 years.
We decided to celebrate the maison directed by Alessandro Michele by telling the story of one of the most famous items ever made by the brand, the “Flora” silk scarf. Its floral pattern has inspired and continues to inspire Gucci’s objects and collections.

The protagonists of this story that has the characteristics of a fairy tale are mainly three: the illustrator Vittorio Accornero de Testa, Rodolfo Gucci and Princess Grace Kelly

Let’s rewind the tape and go back in time to 1966 when the immortal Grace arrived in Milan with her husband, Prince Rainier of Monaco, and chose to visit the Gucci boutique on Via Montenapoleone. 
The owner of that store was Rodolfo Gucci, son of Guccio, and for the occasion he chose to give the princess something very special. 
He decided to commission a design from illustrator, painter and set designer Vittorio Accornero de Testa, who worked with the Italian fashion house between 1960 and 1981, for a silk scarf to give to Grace Kelly.

Accornero de Testa began his career as an illustrator in 1919 under the pseudonym of Max Ninon; between the ’20s and ’30s he illustrated the main women’s magazines of the time, often together with his wife Edina Altara. For many years he also devoted himself to the illustration of fairy tales and children’s books.
He created over 80 scarves for Gucci, but the one that changed the history of the entire House and of this accessory was “Flora”.

A square of silk sprinkled with beautiful flowers became the base on which Gucci’s dresses, handbags and jewelry would be made over the course of 50 years.

A delicate and enchanting botanical-floral composition with grafting berries and insects depicted with the care of a naturalist, consisting of 37 vibrant colors on a white background. The 9 bouquets depicted are composed of: lilies, ivy, poppies, cornflowers, daffodils, ranunculus, anemones, tulips and irises. We also find a series of insects as we said including, butterflies, dragonflies, bees, butterflies, beetles and grasshoppers. 

Accornero de Testa does not make use of the specular repetition of the subjects but focuses on each design in its entirety, a much more complex and expensive choice to make.
Another element to underline in the choice of the subject is that of having gone beyond the canons of Gucci’s identity at the time (Travel-Equestrian-Hunting), in total antithesis with what were the aesthetic habits of other international luxury brands.

The choice of subjects actually, as well as the name given to the scarf, are a tribute to the origins of the maison and the city of Florence with the allegory of La Primavera and The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli, in which in both paintings we find the nymph Flora wearing a dress adorned with flowers.

The Flora motif was revived in 2005 by Frida Giannini. “The ability to look forward without losing sight of the past” led her to innovate the house’s designs in modern ready-to-wear, including Gucci Flora. During her creative direction Giannini ensured that the Flora print was present almost everywhere. From emphasizing the print in the Cruise 2013 collection to reinventing it as a fragrance.

Gucci’s current Creative Director, Alessandro Michele, has united the House’s past and present, projecting everything into the future by reinterpreting the Flora design in a contemporary key, making it one of the House’s most representative symbols.

The Story of “Flora”, Gucci’s Timeless Scarf
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The Story of “Flora”, Gucci’s Timeless Scarf
The Story of “Flora”, Gucci’s Timeless Scarf
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Italian craftsmanship and Japanese aesthetics. Hiroshi Fujiwara x Loro Piana

Italian craftsmanship and Japanese aesthetics. Hiroshi Fujiwara x Loro Piana

Andrea Tuzio · 6 days ago · Style

Collaborations are becoming an increasingly central theme in the fashion world.
While tem-ups used to be a feature of the streetwear and sportswear world, the trend has definitely changed for a while now.

Projects such as Alessandro Michele’s hack of Balenciaga with Gucci, or the one presented during the last Milan Fashion Week, which featured Fendi and Versace, have shown that these types of joint ventures have acquired a front-row seat in the work planning of the most important companies in the fashion system.

The latest in chronological order is the one presented exclusively for Hypebeast, between the Italian company world leader in the processing of cashmere, vicuña and extra-fine wools, Loro Piana, and the guru par excellence of international streetwear, Hiroshi Fujiwara.

What draws attention to this new and unexpected collaboration is the substantial difference in contexts and approach that the two players involved have been expressing for years with their work.

On the one hand we find a company that has made craftsmanship, classicism and the processing of luxury fabrics the cornerstones of its work, always remaining true to themselves without ever chasing the trends and moments that the fashion world dictates. On the other hand, there is Hiroshi Fujiwara – who we told you about here – The Godfather of Streetwear

Fujiwara is a true legend. A legacy lasting more than 30 years for one of the most influential personalities in the history of contemporary fashion and streetwear culture. A personality that has influenced, and continues to influence, street culture since 1980 and for decades to come.

With its brand fragment design interprets the contemporary language of design related to fashion and beyond, transforming every object or item into an absolute must have.

What was born from the dialogue between these two realities apparently very far apart, is a hybrid capsule collection that mixes the elegance and sobriety of Loro Piana and the design of Fujiwara. The collection consists of several work jackets, T-shirts, sweatshirts, sweaters, a series of nylon outerwear and is completed with beanie, bags and socks, of course all items are made of cashmere. 

Italian craftsmanship and Japanese aesthetics. Hiroshi Fujiwara x Loro Piana
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Italian craftsmanship and Japanese aesthetics. Hiroshi Fujiwara x Loro Piana
Italian craftsmanship and Japanese aesthetics. Hiroshi Fujiwara x Loro Piana
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How do you make sneakers out of a sock and polyurethane?

How do you make sneakers out of a sock and polyurethane?

Tommaso Berra · 5 days ago · Style

A few decades ago, it wasn’t so strange to see shoe shiners by the roadside, accompanied by brushes, polish and aniline. Now times have changed, as have fashions. Along the sidewalks now it’s harder to find men in suits, derbies or leather loafers, rather colorful Nike sneakers or adidas.
Israeli designer Tidhar Zagagi has chosen to become a more updated version of the early 20th century shoe shiner, launching “Pixel Shoe.”
This is not a leather shoe restoration project, rather the work of an actual shoemaker, using polyurethane and the socks of passersby.
Accompanied by a wooden cart, Zagagi makes sneakers very similar to the Balenciaga Speed Runner in concept. “Pixel Shoe” is an interactive project, in fact, passersby, by sitting on the cart, can place their feet on a shape that creates an irregular profile of the foot, defining the shape of the sole. At that point Tidhar Zagagi makes the polyurethane sole, which hardens and adheres to the sock, matching the sole of the foot.

“Pixel Shoe” is a sustainable project, highlighting the possibilities of the fashion industry to create products with minimal environmental impact. You don’t need a factory or a production cycle to make sneakers, you just need a cart and the idea of the potential of materials.
The colorful soles then are an interesting style detail. The sole aligns with the concept of barefoot footwear, increasingly present on the market thanks to brands like Vibram and perfect for health and injury prevention.

How do you make sneakers out of a sock and polyurethane?
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How do you make sneakers out of a sock and polyurethane?
How do you make sneakers out of a sock and polyurethane?
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