When BIC became a tool for artists

When BIC became a tool for artists

Tommaso Berra · 4 months ago · Art

If Jordan Belfort, the Wolf of Wall Street played in Hollywood by Leonardo Di Caprio, had asked you to sell a pen it would probably have been difficult, but maybe not as difficult as creating a work of art with that same pen, a BIC let’s say.
The most famous ballpoint pen in the world, however, is not only the most popular writing instrument, it is not only the pen with which we write assignments and sign contracts, but also a cult object for great artists, who have used it to create works of art. Ferdinand Legér, Martin Parr and Alighiero Boetti are just some of the names that have chosen the ballpoint pen presented in 1950 in Clichy (France) by Baron Marcel Bich. Bich improved, and bought the rights, of the ballpoint pen invented by László József Bíró, making it a popular disposable product, which would be followed by the production of razors and lighters.
If you have always been undecided about which color to choose, it might reassure you to discover that René Magritte chose blue for his self-portrait, Alberto Giacometti chose black for some sketches, Claude Closky in his Avant/Après (4 couleurs) instead also used red and green.

In 2018 at Gallery 104 in Paris, BIC organized an exhibition in which 140 works made with pens and other objects produced by the brand were on display. In addition to the aforementioned works by Magritte and Giacometti, there were also works by César, Giorgio Colombo, Lucio Fontana, Philippe Favier, Angiola Gatti and Mamadou Cissé to name but a few. Among these there was also Giuseppe Stampone, for whom BIC in recent days has created a special ballpoint pen with the color “Giuseppe Stampone”, not for sale and that will be used only by the French-Italian artist for his works.
The BIC collection includes in total about 250 works, not only ballpoint pen paintings, but also sculptures, such as the chair made by Kate Lennard with 1102 razors, or the outfit composed of shirt and pants (Out of the Blue) by designer Sophie Hardeman.

The screens, the lamps and all the physical and paper objects created from Marcel Bich’s idea are the highest expression of an idea born to be within everyone’s reach, an instrument of simplification that has entered everyone’s life. BIC has revolutionized the way of writing and jotting down information, has changed the speed of the act of writing making it more immediate and popular, changing a centuries-old habit, a capacity that only great design objects have.
Artists of the new generation such as THE KID or Anne-Flore Cabanis have been inspired by it, just as Giacometti and Fontana were in the past, a sign that artistic expression and its gesture cannot be separated from the instrument, even better if it is fast and essential.

When BIC became a tool for artists
Art
When BIC became a tool for artists
When BIC became a tool for artists
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The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

San Francisco is one of the most fascinating cities in the United States; over the course of two centuries it has experienced the entire evolution of American civilization firsthand, fostering the birth of artistic and cultural currents that have marked the ages.
The history of San Francisco and the Bay Area more generally is now told in a beautiful volume published by Taschen and entitled “San Francisco. Portrait of a City.” Through 500 photographs it traces the early years of industrial development and the stories of the free spirits of the 1970s through the lights and fervor of the Roaring Twenties.

The volume contains images from archives and private collections, taken by some of the most celebrated photographers, who over the course of their careers have been inspired by the California city. Inside are portraits of the many innovators who have contributed to the development of the city, a place that represents “a crystal ball in which to see a preview of what will come to us in a few years,” as Michele Masneri had described it in The Passenger magazine’s recent volume devoted to the city.
The 480-page collected shots also show a city skyline far from the one we know today, dominated by the Golden Gate Bridge of which construction work from the 1930s is visible. In addition to the Bay Area’s unique climate, “San Francisco. Portrait of a City” also shows areas the multicultural soul of the city, with images of the huge Chinatown district or Fillmore, the one historically home to Jews and Japanese.
You can purchase the book on the official Taschen website.

San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
Photography
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
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Japan as seen in infrared

Japan as seen in infrared

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Hashira Yamamoto is a photographer, but he also describes himself as a traveler and researcher. Over the course of his career as an artist, he has visited 41 countries and 161 cities around the world, in which he has shot some of his photo series, to tell stories i cultures and of all the incredible people he has encountered. Over the years he has had a close look at his home nation of Japan, cultivating a passion for traditional landscapes along the Silk Road.
Yamamoto in his Asuka series has reinterpreted the tradition of historic Japanese buildings through an infrared lens, creating a dialogue between ancient and contemporary Japan to an effect that immerses traditional temples and gardens in a glitchy, vaporwave world.

The saturated colors of the photos alter the perception of a solid tradition that in some respects has remained intact over the centuries. Cultural references are not altered, architectures are not emptied of meaning, but rather taken in a new contemporary guise. Hashira Yamamoto had precisely the goal with this infrared lens to enhance even more the quiet and contemplative magic that testifies to the inherent spirituality of the places photographed. 

Japan as seen in infrared
Photography
Japan as seen in infrared
Japan as seen in infrared
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week, we have selected your 10 best proposals: @polae.jpg, @laurasole_79, @claudiabellati, @carolinalecce, @eli_rmn, @_eleonoram_, @teresa_scafa, @noemily_ph, @matti_b9, @ele.naus.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @zenzeroelimone_, @feebelli, @simeingolo, @davidecannavo, @_barbarac__, @valerycia, @sararotola, @saracamporesi.it, @il_salvo_, @_eleonoram_.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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