Photography Photographing the inside of musical instruments
Photography

Photographing the inside of musical instruments

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Collater.al Contributors
Charles Brooks | Collater.al

Musical instruments have an air of mystery about them, and to the less experienced they appear almost like magic boxes from which it is not clear how such a precise and varied range of sounds can come out. A piano inside appears to be a complicated game of combinations, wind instruments cold twisted tubes which it is impossible to get into, except with very small instruments, such as the probe used by photographer Charles Brooks.
Brooks used a probe to go inside some of the musical instruments, photographing their cavities and some of the elements used to create the sounds. The photographic series is called Architecture in Music because the photographs seem to capture the interiors of large houses or galleries, with all the geometries typical of architectural projects.

Charles Brooks | Collater.al

Charles Brooks knows the secret of the instruments because he himself played for more than twenty years as a cellist with international orchestras. The idea for the photo series came to him by chance, however, after he took his instrument to a luthier for repairs and discovered what it really looked like on the inside.
The pictures show the unknown side of a golden flute, a grand piano and even an Australian Didgeridoo, a wooden wind instrument typical of Australian Aborigines. The holes and curved cuts in the wood from the inside resemble points of light, large windows that illuminate rooms designed by a firm of architects. For a moment, the instruments do not seem so mysterious and the origin of the music so clear.

Charles Brooks | Collater.al
Charles Brooks | Collater.al
Charles Brooks | Collater.al
Charles Brooks | Collater.al
Charles Brooks | Collater.al
Charles Brooks | Collater.al
Photography
Written by Collater.al Contributors
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