More than bodies, Rony Hernandes’ photography

More than bodies, Rony Hernandes’ photography

Claudia Fuggetti · 3 months ago · Photography

Rony Hernandes is a model and photographer who uses body exploration as an expressive means to embark on new paths and depict characters who fully explore their sexuality without taboos. The artist tells his approach to photography as follows:

“Photography became a part of my life when I realized that I could go through what I felt and felt with the camera in hand, I express myself through self-portraits and stories.”

All images have a perfect composition and tend to highlight with great elegance body aesthetic harmony in every shape. The management of light is accurate and suggestive; nothing is left to chance, indeed, behind every shot there is a large study that contributes to a global representation of multiple moods that arouse strong emotions in the viewer.

On Rony’s Instagram profile you can find other very interesting images, in the meantime have a look at our gallery.

Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
Non solo corpi, gli scatti di Junior Rony Hernandes | Collater.al
More than bodies, Rony Hernandes' photography | Collater.al
More than bodies, Rony Hernandes' photography | Collater.al
More than bodies, Rony Hernandes’ photography
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More than bodies, Rony Hernandes’ photography
More than bodies, Rony Hernandes’ photography
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Nsiries’s surreal and mysterious imagery

Nsiries’s surreal and mysterious imagery

Giulia Guido · 3 months ago · Photography

Cold and intense tones, faces covered and mysterious, these are the elements that characterise Nsiries‘ shots.

Nsiries, Alessio Maria Ciacio‘s stage name, is a young Sicilian who lives in Bologna and graduated in Law. But law is not his only passion, and looking at his pictures we almost have to say “thank goodness”. 

An artist who works in photography, but also in videography and music production, since his childhood Nsiries has considered art as a therapy for his personal well-being, a kind of cure for the soul and spirit. But that is not all, his photographic production, for example, is also a means of expressing himself, of getting in touch with the world and creating a bond with those who decide to lose themselves in his photographs. 

There is no one genre to which Alessio devotes himself more than others, his shots range from portraits to photos of landscapes or buildings, but what they have in common is their style. The colours are often cold and desaturated, the subjects are captured from behind or with their faces hidden, and sometimes a few elements are added in post production, giving the final result a surreal, mysterious and intriguing atmosphere. 

“I am attracted/inspired by surrealism; I think it’s interesting to generate a certain feeling of “mystery” within the observer. The contrast between visible and apparently visible generates some kind of interest in the observer. A feeling that opens the doors of imagination, disorienting the common sense that makes things already fully visible.”

Looking at Nsiries’ photographs we get the feeling that something has to happen at any moment. Below is a selection, but to find out more follow him on Instagram

Nsiries
Nsiries
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Nsiries
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Nsiries’s surreal and mysterious imagery
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Nsiries’s surreal and mysterious imagery
Nsiries’s surreal and mysterious imagery
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 3 months ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @naomicanino, @photostrekoza, @allecossu, @pylyp.ph, @altrovero, @veber.photos, @monia_marchionni, @martinabarbon, @fabiostaccailturno, @blogridethewaves.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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Serena Biagini and photography to narrate the world

Serena Biagini and photography to narrate the world

Giulia Guido · 3 months ago · Photography

Serena Biagini‘s passion for photography knows no bounds, and not even a pandemic and the lockdown were able to curb her desire to create and tell the world through images. 
Born in 1983, Serena Biagini is an Italian fine artist and photographer who now lives and works in Modena. Her journey into the world of photography began very early, at the age of 5, when she received a Polaroid camera as a gift. 

Serena Biagini
I Wish

Since then she has never stopped shooting, experimenting with different techniques, switching to digital and back to analogue and focusing on different subjects. Her wide-ranging production often includes portraits of women and artistic nudes, but when it comes to changing and questioning everything, Serena Biagini doesn’t hold back. 

This is what happened last year during the lockdown, when she turned her attention to the wishes of her followers and transformed them into original and impactful shots. These very photographs will be on show until 25 July at Ph.ocus – About Photography in the “Please, Stay Home” section, and we had a chat with the photographer for the occasion. 

Don’t miss our interview with Serena Biagini below and follow her on Instagram not to miss her upcoming work. 

How did you get into photography and what is the path that led you to where you are now? 

I approached photography in a completely casual and self-taught way.
I always like to say that when I was 5 years old, as a Christmas present, I asked my father for a Polaroid Supercolor 635 Esprit, which attracted me because of the immediacy of the immediately visible result.
Since then I have always had a camera with me to document the “events” that are important to me: school trips, birthdays, holidays and family moments.
It was only in 2004, however, that I began to seriously study the functioning of the camera (initially a Fuji), to experiment and to feel more and more the need to use photography as an expressive tool.
With the advent of digital technology, I abandoned analogue photography, more for convenience and for the possibility of printing only the photographs of greatest interest; this was until 2016 when, by chance, I started shooting with my old Polaroid camera again with a decidedly more mature and conscious approach and, from that moment on, my work has been a combination of digital and instant photography.
The year in which I realized what I wanted to shoot, what subjects I preferred to portray, was 2014 and, between ups and downs, as in every growth process, I continue to evolve and experiment with new techniques and new means of expression.

Young women are often the focus of your photographs. What does femininity mean to you and what aspect of it do you want to portray through your photographs?

Femininity, for me, is being aware of the love you have for yourself and being able to express this love through a part of yourself, sometimes unconsciously. An imperceptible movement in the expression of the face, in the movement of the body, a look, details that strike for their spontaneous beauty.
In my shots I try to tell this story, beyond the role that the model plays, I try to capture the true essence, that nuance of love.
This is why, before and during each work session, I establish a dialogue with the girls and try to put them at their ease as much as possible to bring out that intimate confidence that I then want to immortalize.

Where do you get your inspiration from? Are there any photographers or artists that you follow and/or are a reference point? 

The photographer I admire most of all is certainly Paolo Roversi. I love the skilful and creative use he makes of light, both in his current photographs and in his old Polaroids, which I find wonderful. I recently had the pleasure of visiting his personal exhibition “Studio Luce” curated by Chiara Bardelli Nonino at the MAR in Ravenna and I was delighted.

Serena Biagini

Other photographers that I love very much are Francesca Woodman, Sarah Moon, Man Ray, Luigi Ghirri, Paolo Ventura and I find wonderful atmospheres in the Polaroids that the director Andrej Tarkovskij left us.
In addition to photography, I get a lot of inspiration from cinema and in particular from David Lynch, my favourite director, from painting, sculpture and performance art.

For Paratissima you are exhibiting in the “Please, Stay Home” section. Tell us something about the shots that will be on show. 

The project I am exhibiting at Paratissima is called “I Wish”.
The idea came about during the lockdown when I felt the need to stay connected to the outside world and think positive.
In the first few days of the lockdown, when uncertainty reigned supreme, I proposed a survey on Instagram to my followers asking them what would be the first thing they would like to do once the lockdown was over.
I received lots of responses, which I divided into macro themes until I selected the most representative phrases that had struck me the most.
Through my archive, family photos and ad hoc images, I tried to represent and compose these wishes of others.
The final result, which can be seen at Paratissima, is a series of diptychs made up of the phrase proposed by the users but typed out with an old Olivetti, and the photograph I created to represent it.

Is there a photograph you have taken to which you are most attached? Tell us about it. 

I am particularly attached, not so much to a single photograph, but rather to a series of mine called “The Nest” which depicts a woman, naked and defenseless, moving performatively inside a nest built from dry branches.
I took these images in 2014, but it was only last year, during the lockdown, that I had the opportunity to take the work in hand again, and it immediately became clear to me that the series – in its dramatic dynamic, confined within a precise boundary that is a little bit like a house and a little bit like a prison – was taking on a new, profound meaning that was different from what I had initially thought, even though it had probably always had this meaning, albeit unconsciously. Re-working the series was also a cathartic and reflective moment for me.

Serena Biagini
The Nest
Serena Biagini
I Wish
Serena Biagini
I Wish
Serena Biagini
Serena Biagini and photography to narrate the world
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Serena Biagini and photography to narrate the world
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Tamara Lichtenstein and her analog and female photography

Tamara Lichtenstein and her analog and female photography

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Photography

They could be frames from a film or photographs from a personal diary from the 1980s. Tamara Lichtenstein‘s analog shots enclose a timeless beauty that never tires. 

Originally from Bolivia, Tamara lives in Hudston, Texas, and started taking pictures when she was still a little girl, when her mother gave her a camera and decided to put all her creativity into the shots she took. 

Today Tamara Lichtenstein’s name is internationally recognized and, in addition to collaborating with different brands and clients, she has realized several personal projects that have literally captured our attention and our hearts.

At the center of Tamara’s artistic research we can surely find the female universe and its facets: leafing through her shots we meet faces and bodies without filters, wrapped in their natural beauty. 

The grain and style of analog photography combined with the perfect use of light and the effects of double exposure, a recurring technique in Tamara’s shots, give the photographs a cinematographic style that is impossible to forget. 

Below you can find a selection of the shots, but to find out more visit Tamara Lichtenstein’s website and Instagram profile.  

Tamara Lichtenstein and her analog and female photography
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Tamara Lichtenstein and her analog and female photography
Tamara Lichtenstein and her analog and female photography
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