Era Mare, a photographic book that makes Venice re-emerge

Era Mare, a photographic book that makes Venice re-emerge

Anna Cardaci · 2 months ago · Photography

Era Mare is a recently published photo book that recounts the disaster caused by the high tide that hit the Venice lagoon last November.

It’s a book of about 24 pages with photographs and texts both in Italian and English. All the proceeds will go to the cultural association Do.Ve, formed by private individuals and commercial activities that for a couple of years have been involved in the protection and enhancement of part of the district of Dorsoduro. The association, in turn, has undertaken to use the money from the sale to help those who, after the high water, have not yet been able to start again.

The project was born thanks to the photographer Matteo de Mayda who was present in those days in the Venetian city. The artist documented what happened and from his very touching shots started Era Mare, a project formed with the support of the bruno studio (Andrea Codolo and Giacomo Covacich) and the texts of the curator Francesca Seravalle.
The particularity of the publication is that it is divided into two halves: one emerged and one submerged, with the apparently normal upper part acquiring a completely different meaning and impact when completed by the lower one.

Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare | Collater.al 1

A silent silence persisted and erased the defined contours between the foundations and the rii, between the canals and the calli, swallowing the streets and isolating the bridges, elected as meeting places where the few remaining inhabitants could greet each other in the dry. Every now and then, for a few hours, it happened that the underwater world would emerge, showing magnificent Byzantine mosaics, Palladian and Venetian style terraces – cit. Francesca Seravalle.

Matteo, in the days of the flood, was in Venice with the idea of taking a few shots for the city where high water was the norm without expecting extraordinary events. What you can perceive from his shots is surely the irony with which this event was faced and the strength of the Venetian people who reacted in the best way.

Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare | Collater.al 1

Every shot of Era Mare is delicate, conveying strong and contrasting sensations, telling a story and avoiding the storyline of the damage out of respect for the people affected. The reportage tells the suspended and fragile atmosphere of Venice, its lagoon and the Venetians.

If you also want to help small traders who have suffered big damages, you can go to the site and make a donation of your choice! For each donation, the book is given as a gift and sent home.

Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare | Collater.al 1
Era Mare, a photographic book that makes Venice re-emerge
Photography
Era Mare, a photographic book that makes Venice re-emerge
Era Mare, a photographic book that makes Venice re-emerge
1 · 13
2 · 13
3 · 13
4 · 13
5 · 13
6 · 13
7 · 13
8 · 13
9 · 13
10 · 13
11 · 13
12 · 13
13 · 13
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art, Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs. 

For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @setteventitre, @geidbick, @erikaconlaci, @augustinegirbalazparreen, @didierbarontini, @annamaria_naso, @allecossu, @altrovero, @nico.raina.photography.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Art
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
1 · 1
Glass Corner, Peter Hoffman’s gaze through the glass

Glass Corner, Peter Hoffman’s gaze through the glass

Claudia Fuggetti · 2 months ago · Photography

The fogged glass becomes a canvas on which to paint in the photographic series Glass Corner, created by Peter Hoffman. A photographer, artist and educator from Durham, North Carolina, Peter has an eclectic and highly experimental attitude, which he seeks to develop through the original representation of places, situations and contexts.

Glass Corner is the name of the eponymous book of images that were taken through a window during the winter, which the artist spent in Chicago.

The work is a meditation on surface, environment, gesture and color, with consideration to how the window paradoxically connects and separates people in the public space.

Take a look at Peter’s Instagram profile here.

Glass Corner, lo sguardo di Peter Hoffman | Collater.al
Glass Corner, lo sguardo di Peter Hoffman | Collater.al
Glass Corner, lo sguardo di Peter Hoffman | Collater.al
Glass Corner, Peter Hoffman’s gaze through the glass
Photography
Glass Corner, Peter Hoffman’s gaze through the glass
Glass Corner, Peter Hoffman’s gaze through the glass
1 · 24
2 · 24
3 · 24
4 · 24
5 · 24
6 · 24
7 · 24
8 · 24
9 · 24
10 · 24
11 · 24
12 · 24
13 · 24
14 · 24
15 · 24
16 · 24
17 · 24
18 · 24
19 · 24
20 · 24
21 · 24
22 · 24
23 · 24
24 · 24
SLANT, Aaron Schuman’s photographic project

SLANT, Aaron Schuman’s photographic project

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Photography

American photographer, writer, and curator Aaron Schuman was born in Amherst, a small town in Massachusetts, the same small town that gave birth to Emily Dickinson on December 10, 1830.

It is to her, but also to Amherst itself, that Aaron pays homage in his latest photographic series SLANT. The whole project was born from the “Police Reports” section of a local newspaper, a weekly collection of crimes or even just suspicious events that occurred in the city. In 2014, the photographer started to cut out these blanks and store them, without yet having an idea on how to use them.

It wasn’t until later, after taking a series of photographs taken in the streets around Amherst, that he came up with the idea of accompanying the images with police reports, creating an association of elements with something in common, but not perfectly matching, just like Emily Dickinson’s famous slant rhyme.

Imperfect rhymes, or slant rhymes, are made up of words that sound the same. These assonances, then, can link two words, but also word and image; it is Dickinson herself who says this in the poem Tell all the truth but tell it slant.

Tell all the truth but tell it slant —
Success in Circuit lies
Too bright for our infirm Delight
The Truth’s superb surprise
As Lightning to the Children eased
With explanation kind
The Truth must dazzle gradually
Or every man be blind —

In the same way as Dickinson, Aaron Schuman has created such a profound link between image and text that he has created a whole story that is composed of Amherst facts and Amherst photographs, but far from the true story of Amherst.

The final result, published in the book SLANT, begins as a reportage of a small town like many others but ends up being a reflection on the thousands of false news stories we are surrounded every day.

SLANT, Aaron Schuman’s photographic project
Photography
SLANT, Aaron Schuman’s photographic project
SLANT, Aaron Schuman’s photographic project
1 · 32
2 · 32
3 · 32
4 · 32
5 · 32
6 · 32
7 · 32
8 · 32
9 · 32
10 · 32
11 · 32
12 · 32
13 · 32
14 · 32
15 · 32
16 · 32
17 · 32
18 · 32
19 · 32
20 · 32
21 · 32
22 · 32
23 · 32
24 · 32
25 · 32
26 · 32
27 · 32
28 · 32
29 · 32
30 · 32
31 · 32
32 · 32
Happy City, the Dominican motels photos by Kurt Hollander

Happy City, the Dominican motels photos by Kurt Hollander

Anna Cardaci · 2 months ago · Photography

Usually, when we think of motels, the common imagination leads us to visualize hotels located along American highways crowded with fugitive criminals or one-night stands, where someone always dies and blood ends up on the upholstery of the 1960s. That’s not really the case, at least not always.
American photographer Kurt Hollander has decided to make a photographic reportage called Happy City, which tells the story of Santo Domingo’s motels in a romantic way.

The shots taken at motels built between car repair shops, gas stations, and parks on the outskirts of cities in the Dominican Republic give the work an almost empty and mysterious sense. Kurt Hollander, who spent four days taking the pictures, captured the exterior of the structures. The photographs were taken at dawn or dusk and without people in the frame. This choice aims to accentuate the emptiness of this architecture of desire, leaving the viewer free to imagine what happens behind closed doors. A sort of “pull it off” effect.

Bright, bold signs adorn some of the motels, whose names include Obsession, Te Javi, Cariño and Happy City – from which the series is named. Each motel has a different design, ranging from ornamental buildings to those that resemble small villages. Although they were all built at the same time and funded by many of the same Chinese investors, each is a sumptuous tribute to a different architectural style.

Happy City | Collater.al 1
Happy City, the Dominican motels photos by Kurt Hollander
Photography
Happy City, the Dominican motels photos by Kurt Hollander
Happy City, the Dominican motels photos by Kurt Hollander
1 · 7
2 · 7
3 · 7
4 · 7
5 · 7
6 · 7
7 · 7