Oscars 2021: seven artists reinterpret the iconic statuette

Oscars 2021: seven artists reinterpret the iconic statuette

Giulia Guido · 2 years ago · Art

Last year’s Oscars, as well as closing the famous awards season, was also the last ceremony before the pandemic. Since then we have seen international festivals and film exhibitions slipped to indefinite dates, held in unusual ways or canceled altogether.

Now, more than a year later, it is hoped that this year’s edition, which will take place on 25 April, but it is not yet known how, will be the one of the restart, of return to normality. 

To mark the occasion, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has decided to celebrate all the love for cinema and films with its Bring Your Movie Love” campaign.
Responding to the question “what do movies mean to you?“, 7 internationally renowned artists gave their personal interpretation of the iconic statuette and the 7 artworks were used to form the official poster of this 93rd edition.

Let’s take a look at all the artwork and read on to make sure you don’t miss the video announcing the 2021 Oscars Nominations.

Temi Coker

Temi Coker was born in Lagos, Nigeria, and now lives and works in Dallas where he is an alumnus of the Adobe Creative Residency and runs his own creative studio. In his statuette, he wanted to encapsulate the importance and courage that all black actors and actresses have had. 
«I knew I wanted the statuette to be black as a way to honour all of the black actors and actresses who paved the way.»

Temi Coker

Petra Eriksson

The Swedish illustrator based in Barcelona surrounded the statuette with bands of colour, inspired by the moment when, while watching a film, we are enveloped by another world and become part of it. 
«For me movies has always been about being able to escape to another world for a while and then use that experience either as a little break from every day life or as a tool to understand other people’s situations and emotions better.»

Petra Eriksson

Magnus Voll Mathiassen

With his artwork, the Norwegian graphic designer and illustrator wanted to celebrate everyday stories, those of all of us. Everyday stories that may often seem trivial, but which the cinema has taught us can become extraordinary stories capable of inspiring millions of people.

Magnus Voll Mathiassen

Karan Singh

Celebrating cinema as a true art form is the aim of Karan Singh’s artwork. The Australian artist and illustrator decided to fuse elements of graphic design with the possibilities of op-art to create a dynamic, multicoloured work that hypnotises the viewer. 

Karan Singh

Victoria Villasana

Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Victoria Villasana creates installations, social projects, editorial and commercial works in collaboration with other artists or brands. Common to all her works is the textile element. Coloured threads become part of her artwork, creating dimension and dynamism. 
«I wanted to represent a futuristic look paradoxically with the textile element of tradition and the symbolism of 5 alchemical colours: black, blue, red, yellow, and white.»

Oscar 2021 | Collater.al
Victoria Villasana

Michelle Robinson

Coloured lines and overlapping geometric shapes are the hallmark of the art of Michelle Robinson, a Korean-born, Los Angeles-based artist. For this campaign, the artist wanted to celebrate films through the place where you should always see them, the movie theatre. 

Oscar 2021 | Collater.al
Michelle Robinson

Shawna X

The psychedelic style, abstract and colourful shapes surrounding the figurine represent the happiness and excitement we feel when the lights go out and the images on the screen start to make us dream so much that we can’t take our eyes off them. 

Oscar 2021 | Collater.al
Shawna X

Discover all the 2021 Oscars Nominations:

Read also: Six artists against the climate crisis, the idea by WeTransfer

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Motoi Yamamoto’s installation made of 100 thousand salt petals

Motoi Yamamoto’s installation made of 100 thousand salt petals

Emanuele D'Angelo · 2 years ago · Art

100,000 cherry blossom petals made of salt to create a unique work that contemplates the beauty of the flower not only in full bloom but also of its petals, which express the full circle of life and death.
“Sakurashibefuru” is Motoi Yamamoto’s new exhibition at the Setouchi City Art Museum, where you will also be able to visit this latest beautiful installation. The exhibition officially opened on March 9 and will be available to visit until May 5.

A complex and enormous work, the Japanese artist has in fact created his salt petals one by one, with a special stencil, for which it took about 55 hours, almost nine days of work.

All the small salt petals, meticulously positioned one by one, are set against a dark red background, which recalls the colors of the cherry tree.
In addition to this special installation, the exhibition also includes some works created in 1995.
Here are all the photos of Motoi Yamamoto’s special installation.

Read also: Motoi Yamamoto – Salt Installation

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“I hope …”, the latest installation by Chiharu Shiota

“I hope …”, the latest installation by Chiharu Shiota

Federica Cimorelli · 2 years ago · Art

Chiharu Shiota is a Japanese artist who lives and works in Berlin, known the world over for her immersive installations that incorporate everyday objects into networks of fabric threads.
We have presented her work on Collater.al several times, and today we want to talk about “I hope …”, the installation created by the artist located in the nave of the König Galerie in Berlin, a deconsecrated church that has become an exhibition space.

I hope …” is a large-scale project made up of three elements: a dense network of fabric threads, 10.000 letters and two metal boats.

To realize this project Chiharu Shiota asked her audience to send her a message telling them their hopes for the future. The 10.000 letters delivered were used for the artistic installation, hung between the red fibres and transformed into an ocean of collective wishes. Enriched with these messages, the red threads reveal people’s inner worlds, recall human blood vessels and interconnect the thoughts and expectations of people from all over the world.

In the midst of this sea of hope float two metal boats on their way to an unknown future, en route in pursuit of other boats – metaphors for the ups and downs of life whose trajectory we do not know.

I hope …” unites everyone’s experiences and gives a new meaning to individual human visions. Chiharu Shiota’s work immerses viewers in a mesmerizing environment and emphasizes that the future is an as yet undefined present.

This installation is on display in Berlin until 21 March and is available virtually on the gallery’s official website. Discover more of Chiharu Shiota’s work here.

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“Flatten The Curve”, an animated series born in lockdown

“Flatten The Curve”, an animated series born in lockdown

Federica Cimorelli · 2 years ago · Art

Last year Italy was closing down to deal with the health emergency. The rest of the world would follow it in a very short time.
Meanwhile, Studio Desk was being born and with it also “Flatten The Curve“, a collaborative, encouraging and positive project.
A year later many things have changed, others have remained the same, but in the meantime, Kathrin Steinbacher and Emily Downe have finally completed the idea born during the lockdown.

About a year ago, Studio Desk sent out an appeal to animators around the world: to create a 15-second animation that would show everyone a unique glimpse of life in isolation.
In a very short time, the call received numerous responses, with over 90 replies. Put together in a series of three videos, the different contributions have now resulted in “Flatten The Curve“, a creative, fun and relevant project.

Each artist involved told their own point of view and encouraged the others to stay at home. Finding the positives in the situation was not easy, but the challenge was also to support each other

– Read also: “Design Trends” Studio Desk imagines the world of the future 

“Flatten The Curve” combines the voices, styles, rhythms and techniques of many artists from around the world, it is a nostalgic series that celebrates the animation industry and makes us see positivity in our surroundings.

Watch the three short films here and share them with everyone using the hashtag #FlattenTheCurve.

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Jeanne Beuvin and her delicate illustrations of women

Jeanne Beuvin and her delicate illustrations of women

Emanuele D'Angelo · 2 years ago · Art

Jeanne Beuvin is a graphic designer born in the southwest of France with an undoubted talent and an inordinate passion for illustration, which she has turned into her work.

Jeanne Beuvin

On social, where she is better known under the name lesfillesdusurf, she shares her beautiful illustrations and all her latest work. Taking inspiration from her surroundings, the French artist creates unique illustrations, always maintaining a clean style, using the same color palettes.

Jeanne Beuvin

Women are always at the center of her drawings, voluminous, always depicted without faces or distinctive features. Recently, she has created a series of colorful, inclusive and non-discriminatory illustrations that focus on girls surfing.

Jeanne Beuvin

The series is entitled “analyses illustrées des filles qui surfent” and through these illustrations, she wants to break down all kinds of clichés present in this beautiful sport.

Jeanne Beuvin

Read also: Warm and delicate, the illustrations by Iuliastration

Portrayed almost always alone, almost melancholic but with their eyes always turned towards the sea, we are sure you will fall in love at first sight with the fantastic illustrations of Jeanne Beuvin.

You can also purchase some illustrations, just log on to her site here.

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