Greta Thunberg, activism on a mural in San Francisco

Greta Thunberg, activism on a mural in San Francisco

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Art

Imagine being in San Francisco on a classic autumn day and, as you walk through the streets of the city, you come across a mega mural with a giant Greta Thunberg drawing.
Definitely an unusual situation but one that makes you talk, and a lot.

A few days ago, the young Swedish activist nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, fixed the pedestrians who travel Mason Steet near Union Square.
This is because the Argentine artist Andrés Iglesias, known as cobre and famous for his hyperrealistic portraits, has created a huge mural in the heart of the American city.

The work was unveiled after 10 days of work with the appearance of the signature of the author’s stage name. The idea for this environmental-themed initiative is from the NGO One atmosphere, which hired the artist after seeing a previous mural depicting the deceased actor Robin Williams. Cobre was also helped to obtain the various permits to make it and to cover the cost of the paint.

The reason why Greta Thunberg was chosen is based on the activist movement that has developed over the last year. Thanks to her and her perseverance, thousands of young people have sided with the cause, striking and demonstrating against all those who impact primarily on global pollution, on climate change and, if we want to put it bluntly, on the self-destruction of the planet.

The mural aims to pay homage to Greta but at the same time to remind people that the problem of climate change is true and current and that it also affects us closely.
The feedback from people who have seen it live or through the media has been so positive that the photos taken at the mural have been shared by the local and global media. The intention was precisely this, to spread the message more and more widely and to raise awareness, involve and inform as many people as possible.

This is not the first time that Greta Thunberg has been represented on murals. It has already happened in Istanbul, in the Kadikoy district, where a portrait was made by Portuguese artists Dheo and Pariz One. In addition, a work about the activist also appeared in Bristol. This is proof of how art is able to communicate positive messages and raise people’s awareness of the cause.

Andrés Iglesias | Collateral2
Andrés Iglesias | Collateral3

Text by Anna Cardaci

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London, the sinking house in the Thames

London, the sinking house in the Thames

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Art

The problem of climate change, since Greta Thunberg represented it, has become an even more sensitive issue. For this reason, among the many initiatives around the world, a British environmental association has decided to intervene and make itself heard.

In London, from Sunday, October 10, a typical London miniature house that floats near Tower Bridge appeared along the Thames. This is an activation proposed by Extinction Rebellion against climate change and attention to rising sea levels.

Activists then submerged the classic suburban house in London in an attempt to send a request for help to the government and alert it to the climate situation. A protest that comes after almost fifty flood alerts that have affected the whole of England.

More and more researchers are warning of the dangers of rising sea levels, which will have worse consequences than expected and in a shorter time than expected.
Because of rising sea levels, many large cities along the British coast will be submerged by 2050 and more than 150 million people will pay for it.
In Yorkshire and the Midlands in England, the floods have made it necessary to evacuate houses and in South Yorkshire, evacuations are being carried out so as not to endanger the lives of citizens.

Prime Minister Boris Jhonson, faced with what is happening, responded by saying that the problem of the floods did not affect the United Kingdom specifically and therefore did not amount to a national emergency.

Text by Anna Cardaci

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Grace Light, the immersive installation at the Grace Cathedral

Grace Light, the immersive installation at the Grace Cathedral

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 month ago · Art

The Illuminate Association and Grace Cathedral have created an immersive installation in one of the most important religious monuments in San Francisco. Grace Light is a striking work that accentuates the mystical atmosphere of the religious structure, served by a beam of “divine” light that measures over 30 meters.

“The light arouses wonder, travel your body to go straight to the heart. We are honored and honored to be able to work with Grace Cathedral to present a public work of art in this sacred space”.

Created by artist and designer Berkley George Zisiadis, with music composed by composer Gabriel Gold, the installation allowed visitors to experience a unique aesthetic adventure based on a path that develops in a linear way, without ever losing its intensity.

Take a look at our gallery below.

Grace Light, l'installazione immersiva della Grace Cathedral | Collater.al
Grace Light, l'installazione immersiva della Grace Cathedral | Collater.al
Grace Light, l'installazione immersiva della Grace Cathedral | Collater.al
Grace Light, l'installazione immersiva della Grace Cathedral | Collater.al
Grace Light, the immersive installation at the Grace Cathedral
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Camille Walala transforms an old service station

Camille Walala transforms an old service station

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Art

Last October, the fifth edition of The Unexpected returned to Fort Smith, with engaging works of art and music.
Conceived and produced by Justkids – a creative house founded by art curator Charlotte Dutoit – it is dedicated to bringing contemporary art to Northwest Arkansas through immersive public art experiences that generate cultural exchanges between creatives and stimulate community development.

For this reason, Camille Walala – one of the most successful contemporary artists and designers at the time – was invited for the first time for the development of the new project and joined the initiative. What she did was transform a disused 1950s gas station into an exciting work of art renamed as Walala Pump & Go gas station.

The realization of the work has been influenced by many factors including the artist’s travels, the creative vein of Gruppo Memphis – an Italian collective of design and architecture founded by Ettore Sottsass -, the masters of Optical Art – an abstract art movement born in the 60s and which took hold in the following decade – and by the women of the Ndebele tribes, a South African community. All these influences have given rise to a concept that follows the tribal pop style but at the same time proposes colorful geometric patterns that give dynamism to the existing elements of the context.

The architectural support of the 1950s was perfect for the artist to turn it into an engaging social space in a single week, with the extraordinary community effort and collaboration of local artist Nate Meyers and a group of skilled volunteers.
The artist’s bold and playful style incredibly enhances the built space and architecture, creating welcoming social environments.
In addition to Camille Walala, artists such as Okuda San Miguel, Hilda Palafox, Robert Montgomery, and Alexandre Bavard took part in the project.

Camille Walala | Collateral2
Camille Walala | Collateral2
Camille Walala | Collateral2
Camille Walala | Collateral2
Camille Walala | Collateral2

Text by Anna Cardaci

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Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations

Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Art

Simone Rotella is an Italian graphic designer and illustrator who lives his life between London and Turin.
What made him knew was the publication of his works in newspapers such as Corriere della Sera and on more complex projects such as the book “For the Gods of Girsu”, written by an archaeologist for the British Museum in London.

Thanks to his outstanding creativity, he has won numerous illustration awards such as the WIA-World Illustration Awards 2019 and the 3×3 Awards 2018, in which he received an honorable mention.
His inspiration and approach allow him to represent different themes and convey them in different formats: from archaeological books to children’s illustrations and stories. Some of his works are also inspired by street art – his first love, born during his childhood – and artists like Blu, Alessandro Gottardo “Shout”, Dran and Niels Shoe.

His illustrations are characterized by a dreamlike look that transforms reality into a credible but alienating possibility and that forces us to find a personal key to interpreting the enigma. It almost seems to approach a philosophical strand that is the basis of all his complex work.
In fact, each of his works is very conceptual and has a strong reference to vintage through the combination of different elements such as the silhouette, textures and graphic filters.
The aim of his art is to attract the attention of the observer and stimulate a retrospective and inner thought given by the dialogue between images and visual sensations.
His style is well recognizable because he manages to reconcile spontaneity, on the one hand using, a freehand stroke and on the other hand the control, awareness and all the possibilities that digital offers.
All his works are made according to certain chromatic palettes that make them almost like real paintings.

Simone finds inspiration by the comics of which he is a great fan, particularly those of Hugo Pratt, Crepax and Sergio Toppi, and by art, preferring the French painter Henri Matisse, one of the most famous artists of the twentieth century and the greatest exponent of the artistic movement of the Fauves. He admires the meticulous use of colors and their combinations.
In addition to his previous collaborations, the Turin illustrator will open his first exhibition entitled “hashtag” where he will exhibit all his most ambitious works.

Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral5
Simone Rotella | Collateral3

Testo di Anna Cardaci

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