About the Black Hole: that’s how we imagined it

About the Black Hole: that’s how we imagined it

Claudia Fuggetti · 5 years ago · Art

It is an important moment for science and more generally for humanity, now we know what a Black Hole is like: yes, we are talking about the gigantic whirlpool of matter that attracts everything with its force of gravity. The “snapshot of the century” is the work of the Event Horizon Telescope and depicts the blurred image of a red ring made of gas that stands out in the darkness.

Il Buco Nero, ecco come ce lo eravamo immaginato | Collater.al

But how did we imagine the Black Hole before we saw it in the picture?

Here are some examples of how the world of art, cinema and music have chosen to represent this fascinating subject:

Black Hole Sun – Soundgarden

I, like many others, immediately remembered the famous 90’s cult song by Soundgarden, Black Hole Sun. The band’s Twitter account has reconfigured the 1994 album “Superunknown”, which not only included the hit “Black hole sun”, but also had a cover that has many points in common with the image of the Event Horizon, in other words: “Looks oddly familiar”.

Il Buco Nero, ecco come ce lo eravamo immaginato | Collater.al

Interstellar

One cannot fail to mention Interstellar, the 2014 movie directed by Christopher Nolan, whose plot is based on space-time dilation. The director used the help of astrophysicist Kip Thorne to hypothesize the appearance of the Black Hole through complex CGI rendering software.

Treehouse of Horror XXIII – The Simpsons

In the list there are even them, the Simpsons of Matt Groening, in particular, we are talking about the special series Treehouse of Horror XXIII that occurs in every season (except the first) on the occasion of the Halloween party. In the Treehouse of Horror XXIII, season number 24, we also find the Black Hole.

SomeWhere at Sagittarius ADaniel Chiesa

Even the history of art is not without attempts to represent the Black Hole, an example is the painting SomeWhere at Sagittarius A by Daniel Chiesa, which describes it as a colorful tornado.

Il Buco Nero, ecco come ce lo eravamo immaginato | Collater.al

The Black Hole (1979)

In ’79 I wasn’t born yet, but I grew up with the Disney classics: The black hole is, in fact, Disney’s answer to the first movie from the Star Wars saga. The film also won two Oscar nominations the same year for Best Cinematography and Best Special Effects.

Il Buco Nero, ecco come ce lo eravamo immaginato | Collater.al
About the Black Hole: that’s how we imagined it
Art
About the Black Hole: that’s how we imagined it
About the Black Hole: that’s how we imagined it
1 · 5
2 · 5
3 · 5
4 · 5
5 · 5
The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots

The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Photography

Blackbird fly, blackbird fly / Into the light of the dark black night, sang the Beatles more than fifty years ago, and it is this song, and its message of freedom, that inspired Jamie Johnson in the choice of what is now her stage name, Birdee. Birdee has been shooting since 2014, when she started with self-portraits. Today, her photographs taken mainly in analogical form are able to analyze the themes of femininity, strength and grace.  The young girls who are the protagonists of her shots are beautiful, carefree, suspended but not for this reason they are not determined and tenacious. Moreover, the fact that we almost never show their bodies in full and often hide their faces helps us to identify with them. They are nobody, so they can be anyone, even ourselves. 

Scrolling through Birdee’s website or her Instagram profile, you will notice that in addition to female figures there is also another element that always comes back in her shots, real water. It almost seems as if the graceful bodies of the girls who shoot are transformed in contact with the waves of the sea or a swimming pool. The little bubbles that caress the skin give light and life to the images. 

Discover a selection of Birdee’s photographs below. 

The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots
Photography
The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots
The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots
1 · 12
2 · 12
3 · 12
4 · 12
5 · 12
6 · 12
7 · 12
8 · 12
9 · 12
10 · 12
11 · 12
12 · 12
The Weight of Memory through Ana Topoleanu’s Shots

The Weight of Memory through Ana Topoleanu’s Shots

Collater.al Contributors · 4 weeks ago · Photography

Ana Topoleanu is a Romanian-Mexican photographer who blends elements from her origins into captivating visual narratives. Her journey into photography began as a means to express her thoughts and capture the essence of the world around her, a passion ignited after completing her studies at the University of Sociology in Bucharest. Since then, photography has become more than just a craft for Topoleanu: it is her universal language and preferred form of expression. Inspired by the diverse cultures of Romania and Mexico, Topoleanu’s work invites viewers on a journey of discovery, urging them to pause, reflect, and appreciate the beauty that exists in both the ordinary and extraordinary. Her photography delves into themes such as the role of women in society, the complexities of motherhood, and the power of human relationships and memories. Today, we discuss “My Pillow”, a project that reflects on memory; let’s see how.

Ana Topoleanu’s My Pillow

One of her most touching projects, “My Pillow,” is a testament to the emotional depth and complexity of her work. The project began during the last years of her grandmother’s life, who accompanied her during her formative years. Topoleanu fondly remembers her grandmother, affectionately called mamaia, as a source of love, guidance, and inspiration. As her grandmother’s health declined, Topoleanu embarked on a photographic journey to preserve the memories of their time together and honor her legacy.

Topoleanu felt that this approach lacked the depth she wanted to convey. Through continuous refinement and introspection, the project evolved into “My Pillow,” a title deeply rooted in memory, representing a poignant moment before her grandmother’s passing. While working on My Pillow, Topoleanu focused on capturing the ephemeral nature of time and the inevitable passage of generations. Each photograph served as an attempt to freeze moments slipping away, reflecting the gradual fading of precious memories and the profound impact of loss.

For Topoleanu, “My Pillow” is more than just a photographic series: it is a labor of love, a tribute to her grandmother, and a reflection of her personal journey through grief and healing. Through her lens, she invites viewers to explore the universal themes of love, loss, and the enduring power of memory.

The Weight of Memory through Ana Topoleanu’s Shots
Photography
The Weight of Memory through Ana Topoleanu’s Shots
The Weight of Memory through Ana Topoleanu’s Shots
1 · 11
2 · 11
3 · 11
4 · 11
5 · 11
6 · 11
7 · 11
8 · 11
9 · 11
10 · 11
11 · 11
Marta Passalacqua and the sad side of summer

Marta Passalacqua and the sad side of summer

Collater.al Contributors · 4 weeks ago · Photography

Summertime Sadness is called Marta Passalacqua‘s photographic project that reveals the sad side of summer. Born almost unconsciously, Passalacqua’s shots place colorful elements in dialogue with desolate settings. Summer has not yet begun, or has just ended. The photographer provides no spatio-temporal indications except for a few clues. A deserted beach with closed umbrellas, then cloths lying in the sun. Or even unlit showers. Human presence never appears but is instead replaced by “objects that smell of saltiness,” placed in a suspended and infinite time that seems to never end. «Summertime Sadness” is the poignant melancholy that catches us, often unprepared, in the middle of a sunny afternoon. It has the flavor of moments already experienced and others still waiting for us, unknown,» reads the curatorial text of Liquida Photofestival in Turin, where Marta Passalacqua will exhibit from May 2 to 5, 2024.

marta passalacqua | Collater.al
marta passalacqua | Collater.al
marta passalacqua | Collater.al
marta passalacqua | Collater.al
marta passalacqua | Collater.al
marta passalacqua | Collater.al

Courtesy Marta Passalacqua

Marta Passalacqua and the sad side of summer
Photography
Marta Passalacqua and the sad side of summer
Marta Passalacqua and the sad side of summer
1 · 8
2 · 8
3 · 8
4 · 8
5 · 8
6 · 8
7 · 8
8 · 8
Perspective, Suzanne Saroff distorted photography

Perspective, Suzanne Saroff distorted photography

Giulia Pacciardi · 4 weeks ago · Photography

In her latest series Perspective, the photographer Suzanne Saroff, creates distorted images of colourful food using glass objects and vases filled with water.
Images play with light and shadow, appearing fractured, divided into several parts, shrinking and incredibly distorted.

With tools and techniques such as refraction, directional light and vivid colours, her photographs offer to everyday objects alternative visual paths.
In fact, through shadows and fragmentation, they seem to become something more than what they really are.

Follow her on Instagram to stay up to date on her beautiful photographic project.

Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 1 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 2 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 3 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 4 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 5 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 6 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 7 Perspective, le fotografie distorte di Suzanne Saroff | Collater.al 8

Perspective, Suzanne Saroff distorted photography
Photography
Perspective, Suzanne Saroff distorted photography
Perspective, Suzanne Saroff distorted photography
1 · 8
2 · 8
3 · 8
4 · 8
5 · 8
6 · 8
7 · 8
8 · 8