What I’ve Seen So Far, the photographic exhibition at the Dorothy Circus Gallery

What I’ve Seen So Far, the photographic exhibition at the Dorothy Circus Gallery

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Dorothy Circus Gallery‘s 2020 programming opens with a new project, the first entirely photographic exhibition curated by the gallery itself. It is What I’ve Seen So Far, a project born from the collaboration between the founder of Dorothy Circus Gallery, Alexandra Mazzanti and the founder of Grey Magazine, Valentina Ilardi, which is only the first chapter of what will be an annual appointment.

The artists on show will be Billy Kidd, Caitlin Cronenberg, Peppe Tortora, Laurent Chehere, Iness Rychlik, Anka Zhuravleva, Karel Chladek, Arash Radpour, Jesse Herzog, Giuseppe Gradella, Claudia Pasanisi, Mirko Viglino and Adriana Duque, who will participate with a number of works ranging from 2 to 6 each. Being, What I have seen so Far an exhibition that will live in both venues of the Dorothy Circus Gallery, the works will be divided between London and Rome.

WHEN:
FEBRUARY 13th, 2020
WHEN:
FEBRUARY 15th, 2020

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.

Marcel Proust wrote it and it seems that the idea of creating What I’ve Seen So Far stems from this very concept: until now the Dorothy Circus Gallery has hosted works by artists, sculptors, and painters who asked us to understand their imagery and adapt it to us, instead photography asks us to observe how the photographer, to match our gaze to theirs. 

Thanks to the shots in the exhibition we would have the opportunity to make a journey through the human soul and its feelings, from love to fear, from joy to pain, allowing anyone to be able to identify themselves and let themselves be completely enveloped by the imaginary offered by the works.

What I’ve Seen So Far will open in London on February 13th and in Rome on February 15th, for more information visit the Dorothy Circus Gallery website

Dorothy Circus Gallery | Collater.al
Dorothy Circus Gallery | Collater.al
What I’ve Seen So Far, the photographic exhibition at the Dorothy Circus Gallery
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What I’ve Seen So Far, the photographic exhibition at the Dorothy Circus Gallery
What I’ve Seen So Far, the photographic exhibition at the Dorothy Circus Gallery
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs. 

For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @luc.lattanzi, @claudiacosi_, @anateixas, @lollo_169, @l.a.cinelook, @frica_ed, @marta_ruggi11, @moulayahmed2.0, @laurapasini3, @kara_mova.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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Place of Promise, the true face of the trade show industry

Place of Promise, the true face of the trade show industry

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

In a world completely focused and devoted to capitalism, the market and buying and selling, fairs are a sacred place where the objects – but not only – that will characterize tomorrow are presented. In the immense world of the trade show industry, Germany plays a key role, and with more than 170 national trade fairs and 10 million visitors, it has won the role of the world’s most important trade show location. It is these places of encounter and exchange that fascinated the young photographer Jakob Schnetz and led him to dedicate the “Place of Promise” series to them. 

Born in Germany in 1991, Jakob showed an interest in photography from an early age, which immediately involved him in projects characterized by a strong journalistic approach. Through his works he wants to present to his public a careful and curated critique of society and its mechanisms, linking to themes such as globalization and economy. And what better way than by capturing the truest side of trade fairs, which according to Jakob Schnetz himself mirror the global, capitalistic society, which is focussed on growth, performance and consumption. For each group of interest there is a different trade show: Arms, sex, pets, IT, livestock, industry, carpets, leisure, tourism, beauty and so forth.

Thus was born Place of Promise, a collection of images taken at over 40 different fairs that capture the moments of breaks, lunches, chats, queues, waits; standardized scenarios in which everyone tries to prevail over others simply because that’s what the system imposes. 

Place of Promise, the true face of the trade show industry
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Place of Promise, the true face of the trade show industry
Place of Promise, the true face of the trade show industry
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Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram

Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram

Giulia Guido · 6 days ago · Photography

Born in Seattle and moved to Warsaw, Erik Witsoe is a photographer best known for his street shots. Everything that populates the cities ends up being captured by the lens of his camera, passers-by, signs, shop windows and, last but not least, means of transport. 

Trams, in particular, are the protagonists of many of his photographs. With their vintage look, trams arrive at the docks announced by the shrill noise of brakes, bringing with them all the charm of a period not so far away, but extraneous to high speed, eco buses, and cars with automatic transmission. 

Erik Witsoe himself says: 

I love how the trams add another depth to the street and make ordinary scenes rater dynamic and often, cinematic.

So, through hundreds of shots taken both from the street and from inside the trams, Erik shows the world from a point of view that many people know well, but that will seem new. Without understanding the reason why, you will notice that your tram journeys, boring, endless and always queuing behind some car parked on the rails, have nothing to do with Erik’s pictures, suspended and romantic. 

Discover in our gallery a selection of shots, to discover the others go to Erik Witsoe’s website

Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram
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Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram
Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram
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Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project

Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project

Giulia Guido · 5 days ago · Photography

It was March 11, 2011, when the Japanese region of Tōhoku was hit first by an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 and then by a tsunami that caused the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima power plant. 

Just after the accident, the inhabitants of the cities of Natie and Iitate were forced to evacuate and move away from their homes. For many years these places remained completely displaced, until two years ago, when the Japanese government slowly began to reduce the exclusion zones and invested financially in the physical and economic reconstruction of these areas. 

Despite this, very few people have actually had the courage to return to their homes, leaving some areas still totally uninhabited. 

This is the scenario that attracted the English photographer Giles Price, who has always examined man’s impact on the environment through his work, and which led him to create Restricted Residence

This photographic project is a collection of shots taken with the thermal technology usually used in the medical field or in surveys. The result is almost surreal photographs showing landscapes and people returned to the exclusion zones. 

Giles Price Restricted Residence | Collater.al
© Giles Price 2020 courtesy Loose Joints

All the shots of Restricted Residence have been collected in a book of the same name and accompanied by an essay by Fred Pearce, an environmentalist writer. Giles Price gives back the atmosphere and the tensions present in a place that has experienced a nuclear disaster trying to question the viewer not only about the extent of the impact of nature on the man but also what man has on nature. 

The book Restricted Residence is published by Loose Joints.

Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project
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Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project
Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project
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