Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram

Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

Born in Seattle and moved to Warsaw, Erik Witsoe is a photographer best known for his street shots. Everything that populates the cities ends up being captured by the lens of his camera, passers-by, signs, shop windows and, last but not least, means of transport. 

Trams, in particular, are the protagonists of many of his photographs. With their vintage look, trams arrive at the docks announced by the shrill noise of brakes, bringing with them all the charm of a period not so far away, but extraneous to high speed, eco buses, and cars with automatic transmission. 

Erik Witsoe himself says: 

I love how the trams add another depth to the street and make ordinary scenes rater dynamic and often, cinematic.

So, through hundreds of shots taken both from the street and from inside the trams, Erik shows the world from a point of view that many people know well, but that will seem new. Without understanding the reason why, you will notice that your tram journeys, boring, endless and always queuing behind some car parked on the rails, have nothing to do with Erik’s pictures, suspended and romantic. 

Discover in our gallery a selection of shots, to discover the others go to Erik Witsoe’s website

Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram
Photography
Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram
Erik Witsoe, the world seen from a tram
1 · 18
2 · 18
3 · 18
4 · 18
5 · 18
6 · 18
7 · 18
8 · 18
9 · 18
10 · 18
11 · 18
12 · 18
13 · 18
14 · 18
15 · 18
16 · 18
17 · 18
18 · 18
Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project

Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

It was March 11, 2011, when the Japanese region of Tōhoku was hit first by an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 and then by a tsunami that caused the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima power plant. 

Just after the accident, the inhabitants of the cities of Natie and Iitate were forced to evacuate and move away from their homes. For many years these places remained completely displaced, until two years ago, when the Japanese government slowly began to reduce the exclusion zones and invested financially in the physical and economic reconstruction of these areas. 

Despite this, very few people have actually had the courage to return to their homes, leaving some areas still totally uninhabited. 

This is the scenario that attracted the English photographer Giles Price, who has always examined man’s impact on the environment through his work, and which led him to create Restricted Residence

This photographic project is a collection of shots taken with the thermal technology usually used in the medical field or in surveys. The result is almost surreal photographs showing landscapes and people returned to the exclusion zones. 

Giles Price Restricted Residence | Collater.al
© Giles Price 2020 courtesy Loose Joints

All the shots of Restricted Residence have been collected in a book of the same name and accompanied by an essay by Fred Pearce, an environmentalist writer. Giles Price gives back the atmosphere and the tensions present in a place that has experienced a nuclear disaster trying to question the viewer not only about the extent of the impact of nature on the man but also what man has on nature. 

The book Restricted Residence is published by Loose Joints.

Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project
Photography
Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project
Restricted Residence, Giles Price’s photographic project
1 · 18
2 · 18
3 · 18
4 · 18
5 · 18
6 · 18
7 · 18
8 · 18
9 · 18
10 · 18
11 · 18
12 · 18
13 · 18
14 · 18
15 · 18
16 · 18
17 · 18
18 · 18
Hereafter, Federico Clavarino photographs the past

Hereafter, Federico Clavarino photographs the past

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

Born in 1984, Federico Clavarino was born in Turin but lives in London where he works as a teacher and dedicates himself to photography. One of the most fascinating projects he has realized is entitled Hereafter, with which Federico has retraced the history of his grandparents and through it also that of the colonial states of the British Empire. 

John Phillips – Frederick’s grandfather – lived in Imperial Britain before moving to Sudan for work. It was here that he met Mary, with whom he lived in Libya, Oman, Jordan, and Cyprus. Together they experienced the decline of the British Empire and the transition from colony to an independent state of several countries. 

Thus, combining his passion for history and his desire to retrace and pay homage to the life of his grandparents, Hereafter was born, a photographic series that alternates and mixes archival materials or even shots taken by Federico’s grandparents themselves, and personal shots by the Italian photographer. 

This alternation creates a sort of link between past and present that underlines both what has changed over the years and all the aspects that have remained unchanged. 

Last year all the shots of Hereafter were collected in a book published by Skinnerboox. To find out more go to Federico Clavarino’s website and to buy the book go here

Hereafter Federico Clavarino | Collater.al
Hereafter Federico Clavarino | Collater.al
Hereafter, Federico Clavarino photographs the past
Photography
Hereafter, Federico Clavarino photographs the past
Hereafter, Federico Clavarino photographs the past
1 · 18
2 · 18
3 · 18
4 · 18
5 · 18
6 · 18
7 · 18
8 · 18
9 · 18
10 · 18
11 · 18
12 · 18
13 · 18
14 · 18
15 · 18
16 · 18
17 · 18
18 · 18
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs. 
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @bondageavocado, @elenafichera, @lucasbarbosaphotos, @marcocarta87, @crazyeye_photo, @kara_mova, @fabrizio.verracchia, @new_dreamlab, @allecossu.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on next InstHunt.

View this post on Instagram

Sorry for shooting

A post shared by Fabrizio Verrecchia (@fabrizio.verrecchia) on

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
1 · 1
Iris Humm photographs everyday light

Iris Humm photographs everyday light

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

Born in Milan to a Swiss father and French-Chinese mother, Iris Humm now lives in Barcelona where she works as a photographer, where she is always looking for something to shoot. 

Those captured in her shots are not extraordinary subjects, on the contrary, they are scenes of everyday life, moments of sharing, they are the faces of her friends and lunches spent together. What particularly inspires Iris is Barcelona, where the mountains and the sea meet in the unmistakable chessboard formed by streets and buildings and, above all, where the light typical of seaside resorts warms everything, the facades of buildings, nature, making the colors of clothes and skin tones vibrant. 

Thus, a warm light, which makes us almost feel at home, as if we had taken these photos ourselves, and moments of banal everyday life transform Iris Humm’s portfolio into her personal photographic diary that she shares especially on Instagram. 

Through her shots, Iris shows us her personal vision of the world, which couldn’t be better and of which we would like to be part. 

Discover a selection of her work below and to find out more go to Iris Humm’s website and Instagram profile

Iris Humm photographs everyday light
Photography
Iris Humm photographs everyday light
Iris Humm photographs everyday light
1 · 43
2 · 43
3 · 43
4 · 43
5 · 43
6 · 43
7 · 43
8 · 43
9 · 43
10 · 43
11 · 43
12 · 43
13 · 43
14 · 43
15 · 43
16 · 43
17 · 43
18 · 43
19 · 43
20 · 43
21 · 43
22 · 43
23 · 43
24 · 43
25 · 43
26 · 43
27 · 43
28 · 43
29 · 43
30 · 43
31 · 43
32 · 43
33 · 43
34 · 43
35 · 43
36 · 43
37 · 43
38 · 43
39 · 43
40 · 43
41 · 43
42 · 43
43 · 43