Hedi Slimane’s photo shots dedicated to Jean-Luc Godard

Hedi Slimane’s photo shots dedicated to Jean-Luc Godard

Andrea Tuzio · 2 weeks ago · Photography, Style, Style

Celine has unveiled the black and white photo shots that the Creative Director of the French fashion house, Hedi Slimane, has taken for the project “Portrait of a performer / artist”, to the symbolic director of the Nouvelle Vague, Jean-Luc Godard.

The project, undertaken by Slimane himself for Celine in 2019, portrays the greatest minds and most important artists of the last 20 years, and this series of portraits dedicated to the filmmaker perfectly embody the spirit of the French designer’s photographic work.

Below you can take a look at the beautiful photographs that Slimane took of Jean-Luc Godard at the beginning of July 2020 in Switzerland.

Hedi Slimane’s photo shots dedicated to Jean-Luc Godard
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Hedi Slimane’s photo shots dedicated to Jean-Luc Godard
Hedi Slimane’s photo shots dedicated to Jean-Luc Godard
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Solidarity, Magnum Square Print Sale and Vogue raise funds for the NAACP

Solidarity, Magnum Square Print Sale and Vogue raise funds for the NAACP

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 weeks ago · Photography

From Monday, July 27th until Sunday, August 2nd, the legendary photo agency Magnum Photos and Vogue joins forces to raise funds for the NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

All the artists involved, and the archival photographs selected and offered for sale, explore the theme of unity and solidarity in a year of social upheaval that has seen protests related to the Black Lives Matter movement come to the fore around the world.
While acknowledging the daunting divisions and fault-lines running through society, the selection will examine a simultaneous human yearning for commune and connection, aiming to explore the strength of both the individual and collective, as well as the interdependence of peoples around the world in the face of adversity and oppression.

Several photographs depict the civil rights movement in the United States and the ongoing struggle for racial equality, exploring moments in history, from the beginning to the present day, when human ties and the mobilization of the masses have sought to bring about positive change by fighting shoulder to shoulder.

The prints, all measuring 15.24×15.24 cm, in museum quality and signed, will be sold for a single week for $100 and 50% of the proceeds will be donated to the NAACP, one of the first and most influential civil rights associations in the United States founded in 1909.

Here you will find a selection of our favorites, but we recommend you visit the Magnum Shop so you don’t miss any of the photographs of international artists such as Daniel Arnold, Christopher Anderson, Peter van Agtmael, Eve Arnold, Miranda Barnes, Matt Black, June Canedo de Souza, Bruce Davidson, Raymond Depardon, W. Eugene Smith, Stuart Franklin, Harry Gruyaert, Hassan Hajjaj, Bob Henriques, Yael Martinez, Eli Reed, Richie Shazam, Alec Soth, Newsha Tavakolian, Shirin Neshat, Larry Towell, Ed Templeton, and many others.

USA. Minneaplolis, Minnesota. June 2, 2020. The scene at Cup Foods, the site of the killing of George Floyd by Police. As the days went on, the site was one of mourning and anger, but also turned into an ongoing block party.
PETER VAN AGTMAEL/MAGNUM PHOTOS
USA. Virginia. Petersburg. Civil strike, Core group. Training activist not to react to provocation. 1960.
EVE ARNOLD/MAGNUM PHOTOS
MEXICO. Mexico City. Olympic games. American athletes Larry James, Lee Evans and Ron Freeman (left to right) on the 400 metres podium at the 1968 Olympic Games. They demonstrate against US race discrimination by clutching their fists on the podium.
RAYMOND DEPARDON/MAGNUM PHOTOS
STUART FRANKLIN/MAGNUM PHOTOS
Cyclists in the rain. Shanghai, China. 1993
USA. 1973. American political activist Angela Davis.
PHILIPPE HALSMAN/MAGNUM PHOTOS
USA. Chicago. Muhammad ALI, boxing world heavy weight champion showing off his right fist. 1966.
THOMAS HOEPKER/MAGNUM PHOTOS
USA. Greenwood, Mississippi. 1963. After giving a concert in a cotton field with Pete Seeger and Theo Bikel, Bob Dylan plays behind the SNCC office. Bernice Reaon, one of the original Freedom Singers and later the leader of Sweet Honey in the Rock, listens. Mendy Samstein sits behind Dylan and talks to Willie Blue.
DANNY LYON/MAGNUM PHOTOS
USA. GEORGIA. Forsyth County. Antiracism March. 1987.
ELI REED/MAGNUM PHOTOS
Tell Your Friends to Pull Up. New York City. 2020.
RICHIE SHAZAM/VOGUE
Women of Agadez. 2018.
STEPHEN TAYO/VOGUE
Solidarity, Magnum Square Print Sale and Vogue raise funds for the NAACP
Photography
Solidarity, Magnum Square Print Sale and Vogue raise funds for the NAACP
Solidarity, Magnum Square Print Sale and Vogue raise funds for the NAACP
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Cinematography – Suspiria

Cinematography – Suspiria

Giordana Bonanno · 1 week ago · Photography

Suspiria De Profundis is the novel by Thomas De Quincey that inspired director Dario Argento for the 1977 film and that in 2018, he returned with the adaptation by Luca Guadagnino.

It is precisely the latter that we will talk about, a film that the director himself stated was not explicitly a re-make, but a tribute to the “powerful emotion” he felt when he saw the original film.

The enterprise of re-proposing a masterpiece, you know, is lost at the beginning and for this reason the intention of Guadagnino and the director of photography Mukdeeprom, (with whom he also collaborated in Call me by your name) was to present a new screenplay.

It is a story steeped in dark mysteries that disrupt the lives of young dancers in a prestigious dance company in Berlin. The gloomy and oppressive atmosphere oscillates between shades of grey, blue, and green, typical of the German city during the winter months which hosted almost all the filming of the film shot on film instead of digitally. The color red is quite evident throughout the film, not only as a representation of blood but as a constant presence of “wickedness”.

Mukdeeprom also talked about chromatic inconsistency given by a greater interest in representing moods and therefore “how it feels” and not “how it looks” the construction of a moment. This was necessary for the shooting of the choreographies, where the scene is more complex due to the presence of many people, wide movements and time limitations.

A composition reminiscent of Rob Woodcox‘s photographs, halfway between a dance and an installation made of human bodies. He wants to annul the force of gravity, the constraints and rules of society, the schemes and preconceptions. Fluid movements, fluid sexuality. Paradoxically, the body is annulled to become something more: an instrument of freedom.

Did you know that: Dakota Johnson completed two years of ballet in preparation for her role in this film.

Genre: Fantasy, Horror

Director: Luca Guadagnino

Director of photography: Sayombhu Mukdeeprom

Writers: Dario Argento, Daria Nicolodi 

Stars: Dakota Johnson,  Chloë Grace Moretz, Tilda Swinton

Cinematography – Suspiria
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Cinematography – Suspiria
Cinematography – Suspiria
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InstHunt Special Edition – Beauty

InstHunt Special Edition – Beauty

Giordana Bonanno · 1 week ago · Photography

InstHunt Special Edition is the new collection of your best photos that follow a specific theme. Each month it will have a dedicated title and you will give it life through your shots. 

This month’s theme was “Beauty“, the abstract concept took shape through your shots, all Beautiful and different from each other. Discover the best photos below and don’t miss the next appointments!

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@joycegig

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Stay tuned and go follow our Instagram @collateral.photo page to discover the theme of the next issue InstHunt Special Edition. 

Be creative Be part of @collater.al

InstHunt Special Edition – Beauty
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InstHunt Special Edition – Beauty
InstHunt Special Edition – Beauty
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Close, Michal Zahornacky’s project

Close, Michal Zahornacky’s project

Giulia Guido · 3 days ago · Photography

During the quarantine we all lived and experienced different moods caused by isolation, not being able to go out and distance with loved ones. But, if we stop for a moment to reflect, there was not a moment like the one of lockdown during which we felt so close to each other. We could say that isolation created something special, a sense of belonging to something greater. Photographer Michal Zahornacky thought about it all very carefully and decided to represent this feeling with the “Close” project. 

The photographic series addresses and analyzes the human situation through architecture. The union that has been created between people is represented through buildings, palaces, houses, windows that multiply endlessly, creating patterns in which there is no space for solitude, or isolation, but the individual elements merge into one big reality. 

“CLOSE manifests actual situation when we were forced to close our doors, stay home. It made us come CLOSE together – as a humanity, family, friends and ourselves.”

We have selected only a few shots of Close, to discover the entire series visit Michal Zahornacky’s website and not to miss his upcoming work follow him on Instagram

Close, Michal Zahornacky’s project
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Close, Michal Zahornacky’s project
Close, Michal Zahornacky’s project
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