Interface, an installation between sky, earth, and sea

Interface, an installation between sky, earth, and sea

Giulia Guido · 4 years ago · Art

Looking at the installation by German artist Michael Sebastian Haas on the Greek island of Paxos is relaxing for both the eyes and the soul. The title is Interface and was conceived for Paxos Contemporary, a project that every year asks artists and creatives to create works closely related to the landscape that this island has to offer.

The Berlin-based artist is used to working with different materials, from iron to fabrics, from painting to architectural interventions, always keeping in mind the place where the work will come to life.

In this case, his work consists of a huge piece of blue fabric of 225 square meters hanging from a wire above the sea, which then dialogues with the earth, the sky, and the water.

The shape of the artwork is totally dependent on the wind of Paxos, which moves the sheet as it pleases, giving the viewer a sense of freedom. When the evening falls, and the wind too, the sheet remains still as if it were a closed curtain and the show ends.
Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al Interface Michael Sebastian Haas | Collater.al

Interface, an installation between sky, earth, and sea
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Interface, an installation between sky, earth, and sea
Interface, an installation between sky, earth, and sea
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The black humor of seanfromtexas’ tattoos

The black humor of seanfromtexas’ tattoos

Giulia Guido · 4 years ago · Art

Sean Williams’ career and passion for tattoos began in Texas, in his parents’ home. Today, after moving to Los Angeles and becoming seanfromtexas for the world, he is one of California’s best-known tattoo artists, but not only.

His over 400,000 followers on Instagram are in love with his style and what he can create. These are unusual tattoos, so forget the colors of Szymon Gdowicz and the quietness of those of Rit Kit.

Seanfromtexas’ ink masterpieces are distinguished from those of his colleagues by the exclusive use of black, the dark and heavy lines and the black humor sketches and writings.

To make it even more creepy and fun, Sean’s favorite subjects are skulls and skeletons, astronauts and aliens, who seem to meet on the skin of his clients in surreal black and white situations.

I recommend, don’t mistake the simplicity and childlike side of his tattoos for inexperience, because seanfromtexas has a 20-year career behind him, which has rightly brought him to the notoriety of today.

seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al seanfromtexas Sean Williams | Collater.al

The black humor of seanfromtexas’ tattoos
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In every wire a memory, the installation of HOTTEA

In every wire a memory, the installation of HOTTEA

Claudia Fuggetti · 4 years ago · Art

HOTTEA is the pseudonym of Eric Rieger, the street artist who is known also in the artistic circuit of galleries and museums with his installations. To characterize his style is the element of the wire, which combines experiences, memories, and facts of his private life. These colorful waterfalls can be admired in very different locations like bridges, galleries, palaces and represent the connection with the past and with the present that has contributed to shaping it. The artist explains his creative process as follows:

“Color represents memories and experiences for me, it all depends on what really strikes me at the time of installation, I have always let my life disentangle naturally and influence my artistic practice. I drive, and from there I create a design based on what I’m going through at the time, not being able to paint inspired me to create something completely opposite “.

Sharing your work with relatives, friends, and family is an important and inspiring phase a type of sharing that can not happen with his street artist activity. Visit HOTTEA‘s Instagram and, if you like this kind of art, take a look also at The reversed garden: incredible installation by Rebecca Louise Law.

In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al In ogni filo un ricordo, l'installazione di HOTTEA | Collater.al

In every wire a memory, the installation of HOTTEA
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In every wire a memory, the installation of HOTTEA
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Balenciaga uses CGI in its latest Instagram Campaign

Balenciaga uses CGI in its latest Instagram Campaign

Collater.al Contributors · 4 years ago · Art, Style

The use of Computer Generated Imagery is not new to fashion industry. Starting from 2013, luxury brands like Givenchy and Louis Vuitton started to include virtual models in their campaign castings.

This year, for the presentation the Pre-Fall 2018 collection, Balmain launched a new advertising campaign featuring three models of different ethnicities signed by Cameron-James Williams (creator of Shudu, the first digital supermodel of color), opening a debate on the values and beauty standards promoted within the industry.

 

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Un post condiviso da BALMAIN (@balmain) in data:

Recently, also Balenciaga joined the debate, thanks to an Instagram campaign in the pursuit of reality distortion. The show held in September, to present the SS19 collection, threw us in a virtual reality without time, with a tunnel of screens wrapping the public with high-tec imagery (read here to know more). Taking forward the change of direction, futuristic and nostalgic, launched by Demna Gvasalia, Balenciaga proposes an all-virtual casting for its latest Instagram campaign. The videos appeared on social media show digital renders of 3D models, strictly in Balenciaga style, contorting in a way that challenges the laws of human anatomy.

The campaign was made by the artist of Turkish descent Yilmaz Sen, who worked on the project for a month side-by-side with stylist Lotta Volkova. The artist was contacted by the brand this summer, showing interest to some of his working and proposing a collaboration that was a meeting point between Sen’s work and the brand’s aesthetic. The young artist, that is now based in Copenaghen, has an accademic foundation in industrial product design at the Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University in Istanbul and has learned animation and motion design by himself.

 

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The reactions to the post, once again, have been contrasting: there’s who defined the post original and innovative, and who found it weird and uncomfortable. As the artist himself points out in an interview with Dazed and Confused:

“It’s unusual to create something that has no connection to reality. For the common audience this might be scary because you take something realistic and then it breaks apart to be weird, abstract, and unidentifiable”

Confrontation with virtual models created ad hoc is the last challenge launched by the fashion industry, which has led to many questions regarding the type of message and the unnatural beauty ideals proposed. In 2013, Louis Vuitton designed costumes for Japanese singer avatar Hatsune Miku, who boasts collaborations with Lady Gaga and Pharrell. In May 2016, Riccardo Tisci’s Givenchy designed a haute couture gown for the influencer and, on the same year, Lil Miquela’s first selfie was posted on Instagram, now in company of streetwear guru Lawko.

Many are the models who took part in a debate started on the casting choice of virtual models, finding it scary to compete with unreal girls and wondering what impact will this technology have on their careers.

 

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In the case of Balenciaga, anyway, the models represented correspond to the previous castings standards and the campaign seems to just keep going on the wave of reality exaggeration and distortion started by the brand.

Text by Enrica Miller

 

Balenciaga uses CGI in its latest Instagram Campaign
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Balenciaga uses CGI in its latest Instagram Campaign
Balenciaga uses CGI in its latest Instagram Campaign
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Matt Cunningham’s 80’s and 90’s style collages

Matt Cunningham’s 80’s and 90’s style collages

Claudia Fuggetti · 4 years ago · Art

Once you enter the world of Matt Cunningham, better known as Moon Patrol, you do not want to get out of it anymore. He takes inspiration by  ’80s and’ 90s imaginary, in particular, that which refers to comics, horror films, and folklore of the two eras. His reinterpretation actualizes this universe, which becomes a true narrative poetic.

The illustrations are another important source from which the artist takes inspiration, the final intent is to tell a story and investigate the subconscious. Mixing vintage elements and offering a new look that starts from the past and is projected into the present is a difficult task, in which Matt really does well.

Also, visit his Instagram account.

I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al I collage in stile anni '80 e '90 di Matt Cunningham | Collater.al

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