The holy ceremony of Maël G. Lagadec

The holy ceremony of Maël G. Lagadec

Tommaso Berra · 6 months ago · Photography

The dance is a ceremony, a tribal rite that resembles a journey to the interior of the soul and the Earth. The two bodies portrayed by Maël G. Lagadec in the LUNAR series are naked, primordial and not yet contaminated by terrestrial interferences, as if they were the mother and father of the entire human race, coming from the Moon.
Only the Moon, in fact, knows the secret of this dance, in which the bodies are a treasure chest that opens to a metaphysical world, giving the possibility to the sky to be reflected inside bodies of bones and muscles.
The man and the woman portrayed by Maël G. Lagadec do not hide the motions of the soul and the nerves in physical and emotional tension, nor do they hide the effort to rise to a verticality, which is the thrust of the spirit.

The contrast and play of mirrors between the two figures is not only conceptual but also visual and material. Black and white dialogue through the use of dust, the material of a lunar landscape, which joins the flesh of the woman, bringing out the tension of her movements. The dynamic aspect also characterizes the photographs of the man, his head covered in white powder, a metaphor for abandonment to nature, while explosive movements release the energy of a sacred ecstasy.
All of Maël G. Lagadec’s projects are online, as is LUNAR, for which a photographic book has also been produced and can be purchased from the French artist’s website.

Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al
Maël G. Lagadec | Collater.al

The holy ceremony of Maël G. Lagadec
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The holy ceremony of Maël G. Lagadec
The holy ceremony of Maël G. Lagadec
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Marius Budu, What does our body look like in dreams?

Marius Budu, What does our body look like in dreams?

Tommaso Berra · 6 months ago · Photography

What do we really look like when we dream? What does our body look like, as seen through the eyes of our nightmares? Often our fears in sleep are anthropomorphic, while we rarely have an idea of how our arms and legs exist in the subconscious. Marius Budu with his ‘Dreamworldseries traces the steps of the human experience, combining the cold objectivity of photography to the mystery of dream worlds, in which the viewer enters through lenses that distort the bodies of the models. In dreams are we perhaps naked? Our naked body, stripped of social status and preconceptions related to the clothing we wear, is the purest form to reach the human spirit that Marius Budu wants to explore. To do so, he does not stop at the form with which we are accustomed to observing ourselves, but imagines it malleable, overwhelmed by spirals that elongate the limbs, leaving recognizable only a few details such as skin color, breasts and twisted legs. In this way our body becomes only one of the possibilities, while the dream a range of many other worlds and dimensions within which our bodies can live.

In the Divergent, Lilith, Omega, Pulsar, Revolution series, the photographs represent Budu’s fascination with the human body as raw material for art. The shots are stimuli for the viewers, nothing is certain but only suggested, playing with the expectations of the viewer and the limits of empirical experience. 

Divergent

Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al

Lilith

Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al

Omega

Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al

Pulsar

Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al

Revolution

Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al
Marius Badu | Collater.al

Models: 
Divergent: Stephanie Sahlgren
Lilith: Lilith Etch
Omega: Aja Jane, Kyle Patrick, Petr Devaikin, Bonny Zahara, Delfine Dahlia, Nils Loe, Victoria G. and Estela Suarez
Pulsar: Aja Jane
Revolution: Simone

www.mariusbudu.com

www.instagram.com/mariusbudu 

Marius Budu, What does our body look like in dreams?
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Marius Budu, What does our body look like in dreams?
Marius Budu, What does our body look like in dreams?
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 6 months ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @elaverre, @martinabarbon, @saracamporesi.it, @zenzeroelimone_, @valerycia, @giorgia_re98, @yehorova.photo, @giorgia_congia, @_fabiomonticone_, @gensiulia.ph.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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Fabien Dettori – Photographs as paintings

Fabien Dettori – Photographs as paintings

Collater.al Contributors · 6 months ago · Photography

Fabien Dettori is a painter and a photographer, not one of these two things before the other, he never separates the two moments. It’s easy to understand this through his photographs, shots of female bodies wrapped in eroticism and delicacy. Fabien Dettori is an artisan photographer, the colors that make the air visible as in a painting by Leonardo help you breathe an air of craft. The women portrayed give the impression of being painted in oils while the cracks between the pigment stains are cracks of emotional fragility, laid bare not only ideally. Dettori’s photographs are not an exercise in style, the technique is surpassed by the fullness of the moment portrayed by the photographer. The women express all the emotionality of the moment, they look into the camera with the same sincerity with which they allow themselves to be looked at in all their natural beauty, with their bodies contorted into poses that are a continuous homage to the history of art. Women lying down like Venus, tattooed, delicate as if they came out of Degas’ canvases, classical backs as if they were Ingres’ paintings, abandoned and erotic as in Schiele or Courbet. 
 
Fabien Dettori’s production is complete and of great substance, all his projects can be seen on the artist’s Instagram profile.

Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori | Collater.al
Fabien Dettori – Photographs as paintings
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Fabien Dettori – Photographs as paintings
Fabien Dettori – Photographs as paintings
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Valentina Gurli: «I didn’t choose photography, it chose me»

Valentina Gurli: «I didn’t choose photography, it chose me»

Giulia Guido · 6 months ago · Photography

Emotions and sorrows become images thanks to Valentina Gurli‘s attentive and delicate eye. 
Valentina Gurli is an Italian photographer who, through black and white shots in which light and shadows reveal body parts and fragility, tackles the themes of sensuality and femininity.
We asked her a few questions to dig deeper into her career, her style and to reveal what she wants to tell us. 

When and how did you start photographing?

I started taking photographs about ten years ago, initially to immortalise my daughter, who was born a few years earlier, then as time went by it became almost a necessity.

It was a real “flash”: I found a camera from the 1970s in a drawer, an Olympus, analogue of course, with a roll of film still in charge who knows how many years old. I knew something about cameras, having grown up with an uncle who was a photojournalist, so I decided to pick it up and take a picture. From that day on, I never stopped. Of course, the roll of film was very damaged and the first photos were rather poor, but the emotion that started inside me opened my eyes. 

Why did you choose this medium to express yourself?

I didn’t choose photography, it chose me. I always say that I don’t believe in chance and that photography was the gift my daughter gave me when she came into the world. My path was very different as I have a degree in law. The world of art and photography has been a rebirth for me, a return and breathing in a true and authentic way.

What do you like to tell through photography?

What I try to tell through photography is my life, my feelings, the inner evolutions that have accompanied me over the years. The pain but also the beauty and sensuality of the female world.

What is femininity for you?

Femininity is a kind of status. If a woman is feminine, she is always feminine, even in a burlap sack, wrapped up in pyjamas or wearing her make-up in the morning. It is a gift, a privilege that allows you to be the spokesperson for a complex and beautiful universe such as that of women in their most sublime and delicate essence, a sort of natural universal force.

What is sensuality for you?

For me, sensuality is a huge vase where sweetness, intelligence, sensitivity, a pinch of innocence and a natural predisposition to listen to the senses are mixed together in perfect harmony.

Your images manage to naturally recount moments of real intimacy. How do you capture it?

There is a wonderful harmony between me and the women I photograph, a feeling of mutual abandonment in which they try to interpret me through their own experience and their own lives, creating truly unique moments. I am very grateful for this.

What do you think about the censorship of the female body on social platforms?

Censorship on social platforms as it is presented, without any real coherence and meaning, I find it pathetic and hypocritical, the result of a society that wants to be good but is quite the opposite.

Do you think that beyond this, is the attitude towards beauty standards really changing?

The canons of beauty are the real problem for the new generations today, a non-existent, empty beauty, made up of filters that change features and non-acceptance of natural imperfections. This leads to a tragic uniformity in both appearance and personal style. Despite the attempt, which in my opinion has had the opposite effect, of various fashion houses to introduce less perfect and attractive models, we are a long way from acceptance, the key word for a serene existence and coexistence.

Valentina Gurli
Valentina Gurli
Valentina Gurli
Valentina Gurli
Valentina Gurli
Valentina Gurli
Valentina Gurli: «I didn’t choose photography, it chose me»
Photography
Valentina Gurli: «I didn’t choose photography, it chose me»
Valentina Gurli: «I didn’t choose photography, it chose me»
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