Marta D’Asaro minimal illustrations inspired by human

Marta D’Asaro minimal illustrations inspired by human

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art

Marta D’Asaro is an Italian illustrator and graphic designer who, after studying at the European Institute of Design, decided to take a few years to travel between Europe and the United States working as music editor of Vice.

After this period, which lasted almost three years, she found work as creative director of a literary magazine that, due to the small budget she had at her disposal, gave her what would later become her profession.

Her illustrations are minimal, with a strong conceptual meaning, but, unlike her previous graphic works, she added elements she did not previously use: human figures.
The relationship that she loves to investigate is that of human-computer and, the message behind her works are always very clear and direct.

Here is our selection and here you can discover something more.

Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 1 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 2 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 3 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 4 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 5 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 6 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 7 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 8 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 9 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 10 Le illustrazioni minimali ispirate all uomo di Marta Dasaro | Collater.al 11

Marta D’Asaro minimal illustrations inspired by human
Art
Marta D’Asaro minimal illustrations inspired by human
Marta D’Asaro minimal illustrations inspired by human
1 · 11
2 · 11
3 · 11
4 · 11
5 · 11
6 · 11
7 · 11
8 · 11
9 · 11
10 · 11
11 · 11
Vetements and Harrods installation against overproduction

Vetements and Harrods installation against overproduction

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art, Style

In an attempt to raise public awareness about the growing problem of overproduction, the Swiss brand Vetements has decided to occupy 4 showcases of the London department store Harrods with numerous unused garments by normal passers-by.

The whole, huge installation is in fact composed only of garments that the brand has asked to donate through some bank displays embedded in the windows.
The mountains of clothes represent the mass production and all the resources that are uselessly used for the creation of garments that, punctually are thrown away.

“For brands to become more sustainable today, they need to do one simple thing: have their supply meet their demand. It’s like throwing away food in a world full of hunger. Our planet is sick because of us, because we want more and more and more, without thinking of generations to come.”

Told Vogue the CEO of Vetements, Guram Gvasalia.

If you want to participate, you can hand in your old items via the bank displays embedded in the windows. In return, you’ll receive an exclusive Vetements x Harrods wristband made from recycled plastic bottles.
If you’re not in London don’t worry, it seems that the installations will go around all the world’s major department stores.

installazione di Vetements e Harrods contro la sovrapproduzione | Collater.al 1 installazione di Vetements e Harrods contro la sovrapproduzione | Collater.al 5 installazione di Vetements e Harrods contro la sovrapproduzione | Collater.al 2 installazione di Vetements e Harrods contro la sovrapproduzione | Collater.al 3 installazione di Vetements e Harrods contro la sovrapproduzione | Collater.al 4

Vetements and Harrods installation against overproduction
Art
Vetements and Harrods installation against overproduction
Vetements and Harrods installation against overproduction
1 · 5
2 · 5
3 · 5
4 · 5
5 · 5
Sergio Garcia impertinent hands

Sergio Garcia impertinent hands

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art

We move our hands continuously.
To work, to play, to please with emphasis our words, to do everything we need.

Our hands are always on the move, but there are also those who love to stop and capture them at a specific moment.
He is the half Cuban and half American artist Sergio Garcia and his sculptures are now famous all over the world.

Some are more realistic, such as those that tighten a cigarette, pour the controversial makatussin (the cough syrup used as drugs), to blow bubbles, and some much more surreal as the toothed mouth that comes out, terrifying, from a palm.

“I have always appreciated the use of unconventional as a basis for my works of art. I like to create art that people can relate to and that stimulates the creative subconscious. Not only to create an emotional relationship between art and spectator, but to evoke questions about how and why. It is this desire to create a connection with the viewer that feeds my creativity.”

You can follow all his work on his website or on his Instagram profile.

Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 8 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 5 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 6 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 4 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 10 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 1 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 9 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 7 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 3 Le mani impertinenti dello scultore Sergio Garcia | Collater.al 2

Sergio Garcia impertinent hands
Art
Sergio Garcia impertinent hands
Sergio Garcia impertinent hands
1 · 10
2 · 10
3 · 10
4 · 10
5 · 10
6 · 10
7 · 10
8 · 10
9 · 10
10 · 10
The two murals by Ampparito for New Zealand Street Prints event

The two murals by Ampparito for New Zealand Street Prints event

Giulia Pacciardi · 2 years ago · Art

Ampparito is a young Spanish street artist who recently flew to New Zealand to participate in Street Prints, a festival for which, following the themes given by the organizers, gave rise to two different murals.

For the first theme,”it’s the people, it’s the people, it’s the people“, he wanted to represent 3 plastic glasses, one for every glass of water he drank during his long journey from Spain to New Zealand, filled to 65%, the exact percentage of water inside our body.

For the second theme,”care for the people“, he went to Christchurch, the New Zealand city that in 2011 was hit by an earthquake that destroyed a large part of it, leaving open wounds in the entire population.
His idea, inspired by the large spaces that remained empty and destroyed, was to create a huge pillow that rests on a wall that one piece lacks.
The wrinkles symbolize the suffering experienced and the obligation to bend to something much stronger than everything we can control.

His style uses simple objects that help him explore the boundaries between realism and abstraction by changing points of view, distances and dimensions.

I due murales di Ampparito per lo Street Prints in Nuova Zelanda | Collater.al 2 I due murales di Ampparito per lo Street Prints in Nuova Zelanda | Collater.al 1 I due murales di Ampparito per lo Street Prints in Nuova Zelanda | Collater.al 4 I due murales di Ampparito per lo Street Prints in Nuova Zelanda | Collater.al 3 I due murales di Ampparito per lo Street Prints in Nuova Zelanda | Collater.al 6 I due murales di Ampparito per lo Street Prints in Nuova Zelanda | Collater.al 5

The two murals by Ampparito for New Zealand Street Prints event
Art
The two murals by Ampparito for New Zealand Street Prints event
The two murals by Ampparito for New Zealand Street Prints event
1 · 6
2 · 6
3 · 6
4 · 6
5 · 6
6 · 6
Mosaic, the new HBO’s release, directed by Sodeberg tries to change the rules

Mosaic, the new HBO’s release, directed by Sodeberg tries to change the rules

Andrea Jean Varraud · 2 years ago · Art

Mosaic, the new tv series directed by Soderbergh is available on HBO (sky Atlantic in Italy) since January.

It’s the story of Olivia, a talented writer, who becomes involved in a number of shady situations.

Why are we talking about this tv series? For sure an HBO production is always a quality show, always using renown casts and directed by a great name. But is this enough?

In a world where technologies evolve at breathtaking speed, most producers try to modify our fruition method whilst leaving the narration unchanged, Mosaic does the exact opposite.
The new tv show, with the use of a special smartphone application, will make you slide inside the story where you will be able to see the plot unfolding through different points of view: you can change the protagonist by a simple tap of your fingertips.

Unfortunately, the app is available only in the USA, but can Mosaic really change the rules?

Mosaic, the new HBO’s release, directed by Sodeberg tries to change the rules
Art
Mosaic, the new HBO’s release, directed by Sodeberg tries to change the rules
Mosaic, the new HBO’s release, directed by Sodeberg tries to change the rules
1 · 5
2 · 5
3 · 5
4 · 5
5 · 5