Neural Mirror installation, technology meets art

Neural Mirror installation, technology meets art

Claudia Fuggetti · 5 months ago · Art

More and more often art and technology complement and influence each other, becoming the perfect union between creativity and innovation. This is the case of the Neural Mirror installation curated by the interactive design studio Ultravioletto, a pioneering project in the field of Artificial Intelligence and robotics, promoted by the Carla Fendi Foundation on the occasion of the Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto.

In this context, Ultravioletto proposes a reflection on the new technologies that will dominate the future, identifying the privileges and opportunities, but also the risks. Perception is one of the fundamental aspects in the field of research on man-robot interaction: Artificial Intelligence aims to replicate the dynamics with which the human mind works.

Artificial intelligence detects the stimuli and characteristics of animated and inanimate objects within a space:

“Neural Mirror is an interactive installation in which Artificial Intelligence is the protagonist: a mirroring sentient interface that perceives, interprets and processes the image of the observer”.

Inside the immersive installation (which aesthetically resembles Radiohead’s House of Cards video), the visitor, placed in front of mirrored interfaces, is scanned and transformed into a point cloud by an algorithm. In this way, the physical body is translated into a flow of information reworked in real time by the IA, concerning: emotional states, sex, personal information and much more.

By implementing a sort of virtual identikit, the physical data is transcribed and printed through specially designed plotters. And so the biological self becomes an avatar, taking the form of a tangible graphic sign, within an experience that blends materiality and abstraction.

Visit Ultravioletto’s website here.

Neural Mirror installation, la tecnologia incontra l'arte | Collater.al
Neural Mirror installation, la tecnologia incontra l'arte | Collater.al
Neural Mirror installation, la tecnologia incontra l'arte | Collater.al
Neural Mirror installation, la tecnologia incontra l'arte | Collater.al
Neural Mirror installation, la tecnologia incontra l'arte | Collater.al
Neural Mirror installation, la tecnologia incontra l'arte | Collater.al
Neural Mirror installation, technology meets art
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Neural Mirror installation, technology meets art
Neural Mirror installation, technology meets art
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Rex Southwick makes his first exhibition “Querencia” at Unit London

Rex Southwick makes his first exhibition “Querencia” at Unit London

Collater.al Contributors · 5 months ago · Art

Rex Southwick graduated in Fine Art from Leeds Art University in 2018. His creative process led him to analyze a series of domestic environments that through social are idealized. The super-saturated paintings depict our lives, which we roam glossy, through social media.

Rex Southwick fa la sua prima mostra “Querencia” all’Unit London | Collater.al 2

The artist makes the scenes idyllic by inserting figures like workers or servants that reveal the behind-the-scenes and the secret behind every luxury “scene” that our devices put in front of us. The title “Querencia” comes from the Spanish metaphysical concept that, in traditional games with bulls, they put their own querencia into play, the part of the arena where they feel stronger and safer. Southwick chose this word of representation for his exhibition because it evokes the “Death in the afternoon” of Hernest Hemingway.

The artist has already worked at the beginning of the year with The Power Station, the amazing group of the 80s, for the cover of their album.

Take a look at his works, which you can also see live from July 12 onwards at Unit London.

Text by Elisa Scotti

Rex Southwick makes his first exhibition “Querencia” at Unit London
Art
Rex Southwick makes his first exhibition “Querencia” at Unit London
Rex Southwick makes his first exhibition “Querencia” at Unit London
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Daniela Gallego, stories of fragility and beauty

Daniela Gallego, stories of fragility and beauty

Claudia Fuggetti · 5 months ago · Art

Daniela Gallego is an illustrator based in Barcelona. After graduating in Illustration from the University Center of Barcelona (Bau), she worked for two consecutive years in the collection Leer es mi cuento of the Ministry of Culture, Colombia.

Her illustrations have appeared in magazines such as The Modern Bird or Trenza Fanzine, Hi-Fructose Magazine and ArtUpon. Her style is characterized by the use of shadows and meticulous details, able to give a lot of personality to each work.

In addition to an elegant mood, her images reveal a feeling capable of merging fragility and beauty, or perhaps it would be more correct to say that “fragility is beauty” in the case of these illustrations. The elegance of the shapes, the flowers and the composition recall the viewer to contemplation and reflection.

The psychological introspection of her characters is suggested by details such as: masks, poses and gestures, nothing is left to chance, everything is well designed to convey an emotional state that extends to the whole scene.

If you want to discover other works by Daniela Gallego, visit her website here.

Daniela Gallego, storie di fragilità e bellezza | Collater.al
Daniela Gallego, storie di fragilità e bellezza | Collater.al
Daniela Gallego, storie di fragilità e bellezza | Collater.al
Daniela Gallego, storie di fragilità e bellezza | Collater.al
Daniela Gallego, storie di fragilità e bellezza | Collater.al
Daniela Gallego, stories of fragility and beauty
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Daniela Gallego, stories of fragility and beauty
Daniela Gallego, stories of fragility and beauty
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Gülşah Karaca, from biology to tattoos.

Gülşah Karaca, from biology to tattoos.

Giulia Guido · 5 months ago · Art

Willingly or unwillingly, each artist transmits with his art what he has lived, his passions and knowledge. This also happens with tattoo artists, for example, Gülşah Karaca transforms into tattoos the notions learned at the university, but with a touch of fantasy and color completely personal. 

During her studies, her passion for biology and drawing came together and, although at the beginning they found a shape on paper, in the end they found their perfect realization on the skin. 

Gülşah’s technique does not follow established techniques or strict rules, but follows the inspiration of the moment. It doesn’t matter if two colors don’t fit together, or if the lines are too thin, if at that precise moment she feels like making them that way then that’s how they should be. This stylistic choice is combined with the subjects, delicate and dreamlike, which immediately transport us into fantastic and colourful imagery. 

Taking a look at her Instagram profile you will discover that, in addition to making them, Gülşah Karaca enjoys giving life to her creations. 

Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al
Gulsah Karaca | Collater.al

Gülşah Karaca, from biology to tattoos.
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Gülşah Karaca, from biology to tattoos.
Gülşah Karaca, from biology to tattoos.
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Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1

Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1

Claudia Fuggetti · 5 months ago · Art

British artist and designer Gerry Judah has created a sculpture to celebrate the Aston Martin DBR1 car at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Designed by Judah as the highlight of this year’s edition, the 31-metre-high sculpture was placed in front of Goodwood House and supports a vintage model of the famous car. The artist explained:

“This year we have a single, perfect Aston Martin DBR1, the classic British green racing sports car that stands out against the sky”.

Remember that the Aston Martin DBR1 was one of the best-known racing cars of the 1950s, first produced in 1954, it was the winner of the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1959. A DBR1 driven by British Formula One driver Stirling Moss was purchased for £17.5 million in 2018, making it the most expensive British car ever sold.

The car’s support structure, designed by Diales and manufactured by Littlehampton Welding, is made of an ‘incredibly thin’ piece of 47 tonne steel. Gerry Judah’s steel creation was designed both to support the car and to frame it, which is why it is very minimal and allows you to focus attention on the car itself.

It seems that this time too the artist has not disappointed expectations: last year he created a 52-meter-high star that shows off six Porsches, while in 2017 he made a support for five Formula One cars to celebrate the career of Bernie Ecclestone.

Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1 | Collater.al
Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1 | Collater.al
Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1 | Collater.al
Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1 | Collater.al
Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1
Art
Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1
Gerry Judah, a sculpture for the iconic Aston Martin DBR1
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