Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame

Aurora Alma Bartiromo · 3 years ago · Art

5 questions to 5 artists.
Ready? 3,2,1 go!

Tell me five words you love and five you hate.

Kid Acne: “You are an amazing artist”/”You should be more successful” 

Sam3: I can resume to you also in 1 word, love freedom –  hate nonsense.

Motorefisico: We love every word with a special feeling for “motorefisico”.

Scorpion Dagger: I love these words for no other reason other than they’re monosyllabic (I love one syllable words), and fun to say: Pants, Goof, Booze, Dude, Sweet. I hate these words because annoying people I know obsess over them: Intelligence, Controversial, Globalist, Edgy, Deep State.

Madame: I love: WORDS, NATURE, FIGHT, NOSTALGY, SURPRISE. I hate: INTOLERANCE, STUPIDITY, IMPOSSIBLE, RAIN, INDIFFERENCE.

What is the best thing about the city you came from?

Kid Acne: My friends. 

Sam3: I came from a small village and the best thing is that I scaped from there.

Motorefisico: Caos, traffic, the fact that living in Rome it’s not for everyone. 

Scorpion Dagger: Montreal is an extremely creative, fun, and affordable place to live. It has an openness and feels that makes it truly unique to North America.

Madame: THE FOOD! 

How and When did you start “making art”?

Kid Acne: I have made art in some shape or form for as long as I can remember. I’ve always drawn. Drawing is probably my preferred form of communication in all honesty. I began painting graffiti when I was 12 and shortly after, I began making fanzines and comics. I learned to screen print when I was 15 and made my first record when I was 17. I designed and printed the sleeves myself. The same year, I exhibited my first canvas in a group show called ‘Graffiti Bastards’ in Birmingham, UK. From there, I got my first commercial jobs, designing club flyers, T-shirts and record sleeves for other people, which lead to more work, while simultaneously painting Graffiti and Street Art. All these outlets have informed my ‘style’. I’ve been steadily refining that style over the past 20 – 25 years. 

Sam3: I never did art i just draw.

Motorefisico: After that one of us, Gianmaria, almost died for a bacterium in his brain. When he resurrected, we decided to do something of our life. Our first drawings have been made under a bridge three years ago.

Scorpion Dagger: I’ve been making art for as long as I can remember. My parents were always great at encouraging my brother and I to express ourselves through creativity.

Madame: I started when i was a kid because i come from an artistic familly. My granpa was a painter and my dad as well. So my parents put me in front of paper and colors rather than TV.

What are you proposing here for the Outdoor Festival?

Kid Acne: The brief we were given this year was ‘Heritage’. I was thinking about our current place within the timeline of history and how we’ve arrived at where we are today. I was also thinking about my own role within the narrative of Graffiti and Street Art and where my work fits into the bigger picture of this huge, international movement. I have painted a slogan that reads HERE WE ARE. In the context of the exhibition, both the artist and audience have undoubtedly taken different routes in life, yet for this brief moment, we have come together and arrived at the same point within this physical space, so HERE WE ARE (but how did we get here?). For me, it is also about acknowledging the present moment as well as whatever life throws at us, all the nonsense in the world that we can’t control – “Well, here we are. So, I guess we had better make the most of it!”. The artwork will last for 1 month before it is painted over. It’s ephemeral. I like that. It makes it more special somehow. 

Sam3: It’s a video I did when I was living in Rome for a while, the video justifies itself.

Motorefisico: For the Outdoor we have drawn something that could be confusing. Our work is called “Labirinto Semplice” (Easy Labyrinth”) and it’s a hallway where you can lose yourself. 

Scorpion Dagger: Landscapes, scenes of nature, interrupted.

Madame: I’m proposing a new way to interprete the michelangelo’s Pieta, with the light of my modern culture. Just a way to create dialogue between past and present, as i usually do in my work.

What do you see in the future? 

Kid Acne: I have no idea what the future holds, but I hope it involves more projects like, where people are brought together in real life, rather than just through social media. The internet is a fantastic tool and has lots of positives in terms of connecting us, but has a lot of negatives too. I don’t think it’s good to be experiencing so much of life through tiny screens with preordained algorithms. From a creative perspective, I plan to continue exploring the ideas currently present in my work – the slogans, the architectural studies and the female warriors (known as Stabby Women). I’m also working on a new Kid Acne music project. Don’t call it a comeback! 

Sam3: Human bones. 

Motorefisico: In an hour we’ll be at lunch. It’s difficult to see further. 

Scorpion Dagger: I’m an optimist, so I see things, on a whole, getting better; Even Though, oftentimes, it doesn’t feel that way.

Madame: I love the surprises!

MadameOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Scorpion DaggerOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

MotorefisicoOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Sam3Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Kid Acne

Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame
Art
Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame
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Nicolas Miller, a neo-noir photographer

Nicolas Miller, a neo-noir photographer

Collater.al Contributors · 5 days ago · Photography

Imagine New York on a winter’s night: thick fog, heavy rain, neon lights reflecting off the wet asphalt, it’s cold, there’s hardly anyone around and it’s like living inside a movie. It’s spectacular, but it’s not just cinema.
Nicolas Miller, a French photographer based in New York, lives the city by night and transports everyone to the dreamy and threatening atmospheres of one of the most evocative metropolises in the world.

The ingredients of his photographs are few but essential: an urban landscape, darkness, threatening weather and half-deserted streets. Nothing else is needed to describe the dark life of the city.

With his photographs, Nicolas Miller succeeds in narrating the different dimensions of New York, analysing its spaces, looking through the illuminated glimpses of skyscrapers and reporting the mysterious stories of those who, like him, walk late at night in solitude.

His shots respect a uniform and coherent visual narrative, they are dramatic images with few bright colors, many contrasts and soft lighting. His dark environments seem to be inspired by the great neo-noir classics of cinema, each shot seeming to be captured from a film scene.

– Read also: The night photographs by Michael McCluskey

Nicolas Miller works in the mist, telling the dark side of New York and setting up mysterious and enigmatic stories.
See a selection of his shots here and follow him on Instagram.

Words by Federica Cimorelli

Nicolas Miller, a neo-noir photographer
Photography
Nicolas Miller, a neo-noir photographer
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The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina

The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina

Giulia Guido · 5 days ago · Photography

At only 22 years old Alexandra Savina has already developed a unique and personal style. The young photographer and creative from Moscow, in fact, has managed to represent with images her strong passion for people. 

Through her shots, very often portraits, Alexandra Savina tells what is hidden behind the faces, or the emotions, the different personalities, breaking down preconceptions and appearances. 

But how does she manage to do it? With the use of color, always full and intense, through unusual and unconventional poses and, last but not least, a touch of extravagance that in addition to never lacking is just that little something extra that will make you want to continue to browse her shots. 

“Photography is my voice, my language, my way of saying “the world is beautiful, people are beautiful, creativity rises within us and it’s essential.” 

This approach to the human figure and its essence has led her to collaborate with several companies including Nike, adidas and StreetBeat, but also to shoot public figures, playing with them and with the camera. 

– Read also: Intense portraits by photographer David Van Dartel

Below you can find a selection of her shots, but to find out more follow Alexandra Savina on Instagram

The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina
Photography
The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina
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Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare

Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare

Giulia Guido · 4 days ago · Art, Photography

Born in 1994, Caroline Dare is a young American artist and photographer who now lives and works in Sydney, Australia. Her passion for photography was born when she was still a child and by pure chance, she took some pictures of one of her sisters. 
From that moment on, her love for the lens has never abandoned her. 

Caroline Dare doesn’t set limits for herself: in addition to photographing herself and boys and girls in their intimacy, in stolen moments and on the move, she often shoots her surroundings, whether it’s the landscape seen from the window or a simple object. Anything can prove to be the ideal subject for the perfect shot. 

The style of her shots involves a digital imitation of film grain, which matches the colors and hues of the shots ranging from yellow to blue, to red. Caroline’s are spontaneous photographs that speak to us of freedom, of the body and mind, and of femininity. 

Discover below a selection of her shots and follow Caroline Dare on Instagram not to miss all her work. 

Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare
Art
Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare
Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare
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The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change

The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change

Collater.al Contributors · 3 days ago · Art

The effects of climate change are slowly destroying our planet: glaciers are melting at record speed, ocean temperatures are rising uncontrollably, sea levels are rising inexorably and extreme weather events are continuing unabated. The only way to get this situation under control is to act quickly, but getting the institutions to speak out seems to be very difficult. So what can be done?
The advertising agency TBWA\Helsinki and Helsingin Sanomat, Finland’s most famous newspaper, have recently launched a new and original project in the hope of attracting the attention of those in power. It is called The Climate Crisis Font and is, to all intents and purposes, a font against climate change.

The Climate Crisis Font was created to illustrate climate change and its effects on the planet in a simple and accessible way. It is not a font with a linear and defined shape, but it has a variable structure that can be modified and transformed at will. Its mutability is not accidental, but is based on data collected over the years by the National Snow and Ice Data Center, the US information centre supporting worldwide polar and cryospheric research.

This font follows the transformation of the state of the glaciers over the years, from 1979 to 2020. In addition to showing a dangerous and out-of-control phenomenon, it predicts melting until 2050 and the imminent end of the northern ice cap.

The Climate Crisis Font can be downloaded for free on the official Helsingin Sanomat page, visit the site and watch the project video below.

Words by Federica Cimorelli

The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change
Art
The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change
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