Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame

Aurora Alma Bartiromo · 2 years ago · Art

5 questions to 5 artists.
Ready? 3,2,1 go!

Tell me five words you love and five you hate.

Kid Acne: “You are an amazing artist”/”You should be more successful” 

Sam3: I can resume to you also in 1 word, love freedom –  hate nonsense.

Motorefisico: We love every word with a special feeling for “motorefisico”.

Scorpion Dagger: I love these words for no other reason other than they’re monosyllabic (I love one syllable words), and fun to say: Pants, Goof, Booze, Dude, Sweet. I hate these words because annoying people I know obsess over them: Intelligence, Controversial, Globalist, Edgy, Deep State.

Madame: I love: WORDS, NATURE, FIGHT, NOSTALGY, SURPRISE. I hate: INTOLERANCE, STUPIDITY, IMPOSSIBLE, RAIN, INDIFFERENCE.

What is the best thing about the city you came from?

Kid Acne: My friends. 

Sam3: I came from a small village and the best thing is that I scaped from there.

Motorefisico: Caos, traffic, the fact that living in Rome it’s not for everyone. 

Scorpion Dagger: Montreal is an extremely creative, fun, and affordable place to live. It has an openness and feels that makes it truly unique to North America.

Madame: THE FOOD! 

How and When did you start “making art”?

Kid Acne: I have made art in some shape or form for as long as I can remember. I’ve always drawn. Drawing is probably my preferred form of communication in all honesty. I began painting graffiti when I was 12 and shortly after, I began making fanzines and comics. I learned to screen print when I was 15 and made my first record when I was 17. I designed and printed the sleeves myself. The same year, I exhibited my first canvas in a group show called ‘Graffiti Bastards’ in Birmingham, UK. From there, I got my first commercial jobs, designing club flyers, T-shirts and record sleeves for other people, which lead to more work, while simultaneously painting Graffiti and Street Art. All these outlets have informed my ‘style’. I’ve been steadily refining that style over the past 20 – 25 years. 

Sam3: I never did art i just draw.

Motorefisico: After that one of us, Gianmaria, almost died for a bacterium in his brain. When he resurrected, we decided to do something of our life. Our first drawings have been made under a bridge three years ago.

Scorpion Dagger: I’ve been making art for as long as I can remember. My parents were always great at encouraging my brother and I to express ourselves through creativity.

Madame: I started when i was a kid because i come from an artistic familly. My granpa was a painter and my dad as well. So my parents put me in front of paper and colors rather than TV.

What are you proposing here for the Outdoor Festival?

Kid Acne: The brief we were given this year was ‘Heritage’. I was thinking about our current place within the timeline of history and how we’ve arrived at where we are today. I was also thinking about my own role within the narrative of Graffiti and Street Art and where my work fits into the bigger picture of this huge, international movement. I have painted a slogan that reads HERE WE ARE. In the context of the exhibition, both the artist and audience have undoubtedly taken different routes in life, yet for this brief moment, we have come together and arrived at the same point within this physical space, so HERE WE ARE (but how did we get here?). For me, it is also about acknowledging the present moment as well as whatever life throws at us, all the nonsense in the world that we can’t control – “Well, here we are. So, I guess we had better make the most of it!”. The artwork will last for 1 month before it is painted over. It’s ephemeral. I like that. It makes it more special somehow. 

Sam3: It’s a video I did when I was living in Rome for a while, the video justifies itself.

Motorefisico: For the Outdoor we have drawn something that could be confusing. Our work is called “Labirinto Semplice” (Easy Labyrinth”) and it’s a hallway where you can lose yourself. 

Scorpion Dagger: Landscapes, scenes of nature, interrupted.

Madame: I’m proposing a new way to interprete the michelangelo’s Pieta, with the light of my modern culture. Just a way to create dialogue between past and present, as i usually do in my work.

What do you see in the future? 

Kid Acne: I have no idea what the future holds, but I hope it involves more projects like, where people are brought together in real life, rather than just through social media. The internet is a fantastic tool and has lots of positives in terms of connecting us, but has a lot of negatives too. I don’t think it’s good to be experiencing so much of life through tiny screens with preordained algorithms. From a creative perspective, I plan to continue exploring the ideas currently present in my work – the slogans, the architectural studies and the female warriors (known as Stabby Women). I’m also working on a new Kid Acne music project. Don’t call it a comeback! 

Sam3: Human bones. 

Motorefisico: In an hour we’ll be at lunch. It’s difficult to see further. 

Scorpion Dagger: I’m an optimist, so I see things, on a whole, getting better; Even Though, oftentimes, it doesn’t feel that way.

Madame: I love the surprises!

MadameOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Scorpion DaggerOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

MotorefisicoOutdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Sam3Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Kid Acne

Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al Outdoor Festival - Intervista con Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame | Collater.al

Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame
Art
Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame
Outdoor Festival – Interview w/ Kid Acne, Sam3, Motorefisico, Scorpion Dagger e Madame
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“The great empty” a project by New York Times

“The great empty” a project by New York Times

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 hour ago · Photography

From Paris to New York, via Munich, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Beijing, Milan, and New Delhi, the New York Times“The great empty”, a new project recounts the lockdown caused by Covid-19.
More and more countries are forced to adopt more or less severe exit restrictions to fight the pandemic. While countries like Italy have adopted total containment rules, other countries have so far “simply” closed a multitude of housing areas. The whole world experiences an unreal atmosphere, public places are abandoned by people and supermarkets are stormed.

The New York Times presents his project at its best: “This current vacuum is a health necessity. It can make you think of dystopia, not progress. But in the end, it also confirms that, by listening to the experts and staying at home, we have not lost our ability to unite for the collective good. These images haunt and will haunt you, they look like apocalyptic films, but in a certain sense they also convey a message of hope“.

The New York Times project contemplates the emptiness created by isolation in places that are usually crowded, chaotic, full of people, but now empty. A way to illustrate and remember the radical change in our habits in these times of global health crisis.
From tourist places to small typical restaurants, it is the absence of life that upsets these clichés, each one more suggestive than the other.

Shots that count the silence of many cities, with the hope that we can return as quickly as possible to everyday life.

“The great empty” a project by New York Times
Photography
“The great empty” a project by New York Times
“The great empty” a project by New York Times
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 4 days ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs. 
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @carla_sutera_sardo, @odetteombra, @lmashtalerova, @siria.d.angelis, @moulayahmed2.0, @paolatala_10, @francescaersilia1, @adriano.losacco, @valeriaroscini, @martinanorii_.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on next InstHunt.

View this post on Instagram

EST. TRAMONTO – #ontheroof

A post shared by reveriesdupromeneur (@adriano.losacco) on

View this post on Instagram

#viteinlockdown #selfportrait

A post shared by valeria roscini (@valeriaroscini) on

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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The Guestbook: our interview with João Marques

The Guestbook: our interview with João Marques

Giulia Guido · 5 days ago · Photography

It only took us a few seconds on his Instagram profile to fall in love with João Marques‘ shots, a photographer from Lisbon.

If we had to find a word to describe his photographs, it is contemplation, linked both to the subjects he takes and to the spectators. In fact, many of his images depict figures seen from behind with their eyes pointing towards the sky, at night, during the day, at sunset, full of stars or illuminated by the city lights. Like them, we too are completely enchanted by his work.

We asked João Marques a few questions and he told us how his passion for photography was born.

Tell us how you approached the photograph. Is there a particular moment that you remember?

It started when I was around 13, at that time I asked my dad to try out his digital camera, it was an Olympus and it was pretty cool to me. I started taking mostly portraits of my friends and it kinda was something that always sticked with me through the school years. I was living in a really small town and photography turned into my hobby, I was always filming and photographing my friends. When I was 17 I moved to Lisbon to finish high school and in the following year, I went to film school. In those 3 years, I focused mainly on cinema, I was watching a lot of movies and pretty much discovering my passion for cinema. Only in 2018 after finishing my degree and directing my first short-film ‘Incomum’ I stopped for a moment and thought it could be a cool idea to get some more serious knowledge on photography since it was part of my life for so long but never consciously. I went to Ar.Co and did a 1-year course and that’s when I started to do it again, and I just kept going.

What does photography mean to you and what do you try to tell through your shots?

I work most of the time by instinct, so there’s not that much of a reflection behind my work. At this point, something I understood about myself is that I have a need to create and express myself artistically in some form. I love that photography gave me this opportunity to produce instantly, create an idea or express my perception of a feeling on an image. For someone like me who already has a background also in the film world, where everything is much more complex and involves a lot of people, photography gives me the chance to make almost like a mood board to how I want my films to look and feel like. 

What equipment do you use to shoot? Which tools do you take with you when you shoot and why?

I shoot both analog and digital. My digital camera is a Sony A7 III and my film camera is Pentax K1000. It’s funny because actually I’ve never had other film cameras yet (besides point and shoot ones). I’ve been thinking about moving to a 120mm camera but for now still sticking with this one. I don’t like to do very much planning, so I guess most of the time I don’t take anything else besides the camera. If I take something it would be a small light or some prop that I would like to use on the shot.

Is there a shot you are closest to? Can you tell us about it?

If I had to choose one image, maybe this one. This image was taken around 2 am on January 1, 2019. This was the day where I started this series that I titled ‘the sky is a painting’ of night shots. This one represents all the other similar night images that I’ve done. I’ve always felt connected to night time and the sky. I used to stare a lot at the sky and have one of those moments of realizing how small we are. I like to play with this idea of the human vs universe. I would like to do in the future a photo book with all my night atmospheric shots.

Are there artists you follow or are you inspired by?

Sure. There are some other photographers I follow through social media that I find inspiring, mostly I think what attracts me is a personal point of view of the world and life. Some artists I highly recommend taking a look are Mia Novakova, Maya Beano, Tristan Hollingsworth and Edie Sunday for example. However, I think what I’m mostly inspired by is movies. Some filmmakers that have inspired me are David Lynch, Jonas Mekas, Teresa Villaverde, Wong Kar-Wai, and Robert Bresson.

The Guestbook: our interview with João Marques
Photography
The Guestbook: our interview with João Marques
The Guestbook: our interview with João Marques
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Mònica Figueras photographs the essence of summer

Mònica Figueras photographs the essence of summer

Giulia Guido · 6 days ago · Photography

The scent of the sea, the beaches crowded in summer and deserted in winter. This is the essence of the photography of Mònica Figueras, a young Spanish photographer we have already talked about here before.

Mònica was born in Palamós, a small and beautiful town on the Costa Brava, one of those classic villages that fill up with people in summer and empty completely in winter, becoming almost unrecognizable.

This double personality of the place where she lived until she moved to Barcelona and her love for the sea are tangible things in her photographs. Looking at her images one breathes nostalgia for the summer, but also the calm and tranquility of empty beaches that lose the warm colors typical of the summer months and are covered with a less saturated filter.

Since the places and subjects that Mònica Figueras photographs have always been part of her life, browsing through her shots is like entering her personal diary. We look at what she looked at, we are surrounded by what was around her when she was shooting.

After a while, her style started to interest several clients, so for her commissioned work she prefers digital photography, while for her personal projects she often opts for analog, which allows her to obtain better textures and colors without having to retouch the image afterward.

Below is a selection of her images, to find out more go to her website, Instagram and Tumblr profile.

Mònica Figueras photographs the essence of summer
Photography
Mònica Figueras photographs the essence of summer
Mònica Figueras photographs the essence of summer
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