Realpolitik: Luca Santese and Marco P. Valli capture the true face of Italian politics

Realpolitik: Luca Santese and Marco P. Valli capture the true face of Italian politics

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Photography

There are many artists who say they are inspired by what surrounds them, by what happens around them, but most of the time in their works we find a world far away from ours. The photographic project Realpolitik: La Terza Repubblica by Luca Santese and Marco P. Valli, edited by the independent publishing house Cesura Publish, on the other hand, finally gives us back a perceptible reality, which we live with and deal with every day and for this reason not always pleasant. The undisputed protagonist of their work is nothing less than Italian politics and the personalities who represent it. 

With Realpolitik, the two photographers have managed and continue to give us the truest portrait of the Governo Conte, from the time it took its first steps to the present day, following all the phases.

The first chapter of this journey is called Boys, Boys Boys, a volume that collects the portraits of politicians competing during the last elections and published exactly on March 4, 2018, the day in which Italian citizens were called to give their vote. This volume is famous for the shot of Matteo Salvini, which appeared on the cover of Time on 24 September. 

Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Boys Boys Boys | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Boys Boys Boys | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Boys Boys Boys | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Boys Boys Boys | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Boys Boys Boys | Collater.al

A few months later, exactly on June 2, while the second edition of Boys, Boys, Boys is printed in black and white, Luca and Marco are in Rome to capture the highlights of the celebrations for the anniversary of the birth of the Republic, but also to capture the demonstration of the Movimento Cinque Stelle (M5S), initially born to protest against the decision of President Mattarella not to support the new government and, then, turned into a huge celebration for vote of confidence was obtained. 

All the photographic material collected thus formed the third volume Popolopopolo.

Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Popolopopolo | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Popolopopolo | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Popolopopolo | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Popolopopolo | Collater.al

The two photographers are not tired of these public events that, in a period that has seen the mass moving away from politics, see the people take to the streets and actively participate in rallies and party parties and then, in July 2018 go to Pontida. All the photographic material is collected in the volume entitled Lega Nord Party.

Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Lega Nord Party | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Lega Nord Party | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Lega Nord Party | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura Lega Nord Party | Collater.al

Now, we are not here to do politics and/or polemics, we do not want to analyze the work of the current government and we do not want to take any position, but we can say one thing: perhaps because of, or thanks to, personalities like Salvini, the boom of social networks, the spectacularization of politics, the overlapping of figures like the politician and the VIP, it seems that this government more than others has given the country something to talk about (for better or for worse) and has given Luca and Marco further material to collect in the fifth chapter of Realpolitik, MoVimento Lento

The project supported by Cesura Publish is an experiment, but also a satirical analysis of what is around us, of what, willingly or unwillingly, affects the lives of each of us. 

Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura MoVimento Lento | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura MoVimento Lento | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura MoVimento Lento | Collater.al
Realpolitik Movimento Lento Luca Santese Marco Valli Cesura MoVimento Lento | Collater.al
Realpolitik: Luca Santese and Marco P. Valli capture the true face of Italian politics
Photography
Realpolitik: Luca Santese and Marco P. Valli capture the true face of Italian politics
Realpolitik: Luca Santese and Marco P. Valli capture the true face of Italian politics
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AZIMUT, the architecture of Venice fragmented with mirrors

AZIMUT, the architecture of Venice fragmented with mirrors

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Art

The French designer and artist Arnauld Lapierre has delivered his latest installation “AZIMUT” to the magical city of Venice. It consists of 16 batteries and motors recycled in steel and repainted in black, in which 16 mirrors have been mounted, which gently rotate in order to offer a fragmented view of the architecture of the city.

The Gothic of the city from another point of view, sitting on the shore of the slavers it will be possible to admire the architectural details that fragment and enlarge, offering a captivating new view.
Motorized and synchronized, the discs of the mirror slowly direct the viewer’s gaze towards the Doge’s Palace to the bell tower of San Marco, to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore which is facing the water.

The French architect is known for his work with mirrors, this project by Lapierre aims to offer the viewer a “dislocated immersion of reality and abstract contemplation“.
By abstracting and fragmenting the existing architecture, he recomposes it into a sort of network. A dynamic art installation that offers an alternative perspective of Venice.

AZIMUT offers a glimpse of the architectural elements and the sky above it, offering “the possibility of an escape both detailed and fractioned from our environment“.

AZIMUT, the architecture of Venice fragmented with mirrors
Art
AZIMUT, the architecture of Venice fragmented with mirrors
AZIMUT, the architecture of Venice fragmented with mirrors
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Rob Wilson, the illustrator with the light lines

Rob Wilson, the illustrator with the light lines

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Art

Rob Wilson is an award-winning American illustrator and designer, capable of his thick, thin lines of capturing the attention of the beholder.
There has never been anything but art in his life, ever since he was a child while his other peers tried their hand at a thousand different sports, he drew constantly, non-stop.
All his dedication, passion and love have taken him where he is today, and he boasts numerous collaborations with the biggest American multinationals and newspapers.
Rob Wilson was born in Ralls, Texas, to creative parents who encouraged his natural drawing skills. “I used to draw windmills when I was 7,” he says. “It’s a little weird doing the same thing now.”

Although his images are still drawn by hand, his main means of communication is digital. His style is the flat, bold, raw representation of everyday scenes, he rarely uses two or three colors, but most of his sketches are black and white.
Many of his works come from personal experiences, from his dog, from drinking a cup of coffee, from having a dead plant, he has no precise influences, he simply gets inspired by what he has around him.

Now because of the current period we are living, he has started to draw a series of illustrations called “Corona days“, where day by day he tries to entertain his many fans.
Many illustrations of daily life trying to tell the life from home, between toasts on facetime and smart working he manages to tell the quarantine with great irony, trying to lighten these heavy days.

Rob Wilson, the illustrator with the light lines
Art
Rob Wilson, the illustrator with the light lines
Rob Wilson, the illustrator with the light lines
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Art is Resistance – Massimo Gurnari

Art is Resistance – Massimo Gurnari

Giulia Pacciardi · 1 week ago · Art

Next Monday will start the second week of Art is Resistance, the charity project curated by Collater.al and supported by many contemporary artists and by you who, with your donations, are helping us to support Lombardy.

Today it was the turn of Gianluca Folì, the Roman illustrator with whom we had the pleasure to have a few chats while he was preparing the illustration that is now at auction on 32auctions, together with the works of all the other artists who have kept us company all in the past days.

Monday 30th will be the turn of the artist and tattoo artist Massimo Gurnari who will show us the making-of of one of his unpublished works, created ad hoc for this occasion.

MASSIMO GURNARI – on Collater.al Instagram profile and his profile from 3:00om of 30.03.2020

Massimo Gurnari was born in Milan in 1981, where he lives and works. He attended art institutes which he then abandoned for training in Street Art collectives and joining the historic VMD70’S crew in 1996.
After leaving the Academy of Fine Arts in Brera in 2002 he began to exhibit and in 2005 he began his professional career with his first solo exhibition at the historic Galleria OBRAZ in Milan, thus entering the panorama of the new Italian figure in the group called Italian Newbrow and led by the critic Ivan Quaroni.

During the following 10 years, he exhibited in private galleries and public exhibitions in Milan, Rome, New York, Madrid, Bejing.
In 2009 he began working as a tattoo artist at the same time as painting, and his research, in this case, becomes more meager in gesture, he prefers the use of black and draws inspiration from the engraving of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

On Monday 30th you will find on Collater.al and Massimo Gurnari’s channel the video of the making-of of the unpublished work that will be auctioned on 32actions where it will remain for one month.

Art is Resistance – Massimo Gurnari
Art
Art is Resistance – Massimo Gurnari
Art is Resistance – Massimo Gurnari
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What remains of a painting, Ballester’s art

What remains of a painting, Ballester’s art

Emanuele D'Angelo · 6 days ago · Art

Jose Manuel Ballester is a Spanish artist who recreates the most famous classical paintings in the world but leaves out the central aspect: the man.
Imagine Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus without the splendid goddess in the painting, or Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper without Jesus and his apostles, almost impossible, comes to mind.
On the canvas, or rather on the frame, all that remains is the nature that surrounded him, the architecture that welcomed him.
The Spanish photographer believes that the duty of art is to shake minds, showing the dark beauty of the world.

The room of Las Meninas by Velàsquez remains vacant: the royal family posed and the court painter disappeared, a real surreal landscape, without flowers or mythological creatures, then Picasso’s Guernica, reduced to a collage of a few surviving forms. Once again Velàsquez with Christ Crucified without Christ, The Raft of the Medusa of Géricault, which saw its shipwrecked people drowned, or Goya’s disturbing shooting of 3 May 1808, of which a lantern remains on the ground, between a bloodstain and the echo of gunfire.

Jose Manuel Ballester is an artist who appreciates the value of solitude, enhances it in some way and celebrates it by eliminating everything that seems superfluous to his eyes.
All you have to do is look from a different perspective at the great masterpieces of art history without human figures, but which reveal so many of those spaces hitherto hidden and unnoticed.

What remains of a painting, Ballester’s art
Art
What remains of a painting, Ballester’s art
What remains of a painting, Ballester’s art
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