The Chilean situation through the photos by Sebastián González

The Chilean situation through the photos by Sebastián González

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Photography

For more than two weeks now, Chile has been at the center of the news, the front pages of newspapers and the homes of our social networks. The words “El pueblo unico jamas sarà vencido” (The united people will never be defeated) resonate in the air and the images of the millions of people in the streets of the capital Santiago – but also of cities like Concepción and Valparaíso – to protest are a testimony that what is happening is much more than just a protest. 

It all began with the increase in the price of Santiago’s metro ticket at peak times, generating mass entrances with no metro ticket, which inexorably turned into marches, clashes with the police, fires, and looting of shops. So, in the end, the price of the ticket became the straw that broke the camel’s back, the opportunity for the Chilean people to claim their rights.

Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al

It can be said that the situation in Chile was one of apparent calm, but under the surface there were problems and flaws linked to the education, health and tax system, privatization of water and the growing inequality between the rich and middle classes. 

The response of President Sebastián Piñera did not satisfy the people, on the contrary, to feel advised not to take the metro at rush hour, to define the social crisis as a war and to feel called “a powerful and implacable enemy that respects nothing and nobody” seems to have ignited even more the minds. 

The streets of Santiago have become the stage of a real war that takes place with the eyes of the world pointed at it and there are those who join the demonstrators also manage to restore and show the reality of the situation. I’m talking about Sebastián González, Chilean advertiser, and photographer, who is always looking for new perspectives, new ways to show what surrounds us. We can’t help but look at the shots he publishes on his Instagram profile, which capture the soul of Santiago plunging into the fumes of tear gas, into the carcasses of burnt vehicles, where blue, grey and black seem not to let the sun’s rays through. The darkness, the fear, the army on the street, the insecurity, everything we see in Sebastián’s photographs reopens a wound that has not yet healed, bringing us back to that distant 1973 that changed the history of Chile and beyond.

“Nosotros no estamos en guerra, solo estamos manifestando por nuestros derechos.”

Below is a selection of Sebastián González’s shots. 

Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
Sebastian Gonzalez Xebastien | Collater.al
The Chilean situation through the photos by Sebastián González
Photography
The Chilean situation through the photos by Sebastián González
The Chilean situation through the photos by Sebastián González
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Stranger Than Fiction, reality through Kate Peters’ lens

Stranger Than Fiction, reality through Kate Peters’ lens

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

Each photograph tells a story and hides another. Kate Peters‘ pictures tell of beautiful ones.  

Born in the Midlands, Kate became passionate about photography when she was young, following specialized studies in the field. Today she lives and works in London and her work ranges from portraits of people, such as the 32 Olympic promises photographed for the Guardian Weekend Magazine or Julian Assange for the TIME, to the documentation of landscapes. 

Among the works that belong to the latter category is the photographic series Stranger Than Fiction, in which the American landscape is the absolute protagonist. As you can see from the title, Kate Peters pursues those landscapes and places that are part of our imagination when we think of America: dirt roads, motels, police cars, and cafes. 

Discover the shots of Stranger Than Fiction in our gallery.

Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction della fotografa Kate Peters | Collater.al
Stranger Than Fiction, reality through Kate Peters’ lens
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Stranger Than Fiction, reality through Kate Peters’ lens
Stranger Than Fiction, reality through Kate Peters’ lens
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Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson’s deserted city

Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson’s deserted city

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 month ago · Photography

Sinking Ship is the new photographic project by Chicago artist Kyle Thompson that this time shows us all the charm of a deserted city in the United States.

Inside and outside alternate in the sequence of the images, to tell that sense of loneliness that remains everything: the silence that the photographs suggest is transformed into an implicit cinematographic narrative. Everything has been left as it is, abandoned to nowhere, only one person lives in the city, who meditates hides and explores in search of something.

Kyle pushes the viewer to confront himself with nothingness, with silence and with his inner self, to push him to ask himself questions, to which there is not always an answer.

Follow Kyle on Instagram here.

Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson's deserted city | Collater.al
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson’s deserted city
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Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson’s deserted city
Sinking Ship, Kyle Thompson’s deserted city
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The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity

The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Photography

Andrew Kung is a young American artist based in Brooklyn who, after a couple of years in LinkedIn as a strategist and analyst, decided to leave the silicon valley and devote himself totally to photography.

His work was soon recognized and appreciated and now boasts collaborations with Vogue Italia, l’uomo vogue, i-d, dazed, paper magazine, new york times and many more.

The title of his latest project is The All-America, a photographic book that tells and illustrates the complex Asian-American male identity. Andrew had never really thought too much about his identity before or at least found it interesting only after traveling south to document the small Chinese population of Mississippi. There he realized how complex it is to be Asian living in America. So he decided to break with conventional stereotypes by providing a platform for those who felt unrepresented in mainstream culture. 

The book is divided into two parts: the first is a selection of images that investigate physical spaces “where Asian-American men have felt invisible”, the second celebrates “the beauty, intimacy, and tenderness of Asian-American men,” he says. Kung’s goal is not only to provide another avenue of representation in the fashion and photography industry but also to question the preconceptions of his audience, educating those “inside and outside the community on the nuanced experiences that all Asian-Americans have”.

The images are placed side by side, bringing to light the confluence of gender and sexuality; the paradox of a man who can be desexualized and over-sexualized at the same time.

Text by Giordana Bonanno.

The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity
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The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity
The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity
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Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography

Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

In English, Dead Ringer means a person or thing that looks a lot like another, a perfect duplicate. Portland photographer Clayton Cotterell has chosen this term as the title of one of his personal projects. 

Cotterell presents us with the state in which he lives, namely Oregon, its landscapes, but also the streets, the lights, the shapes that characterize this place. Desolated scenarios, at sunset, at dawn, in winter or in summer; evidence of the presence of man, a wall, a cd between the tall grass, a hand that caresses the water.

But once he finished shooting, the photographer realized that, without captions and titles, those images could have represented any other place. Dead Ringer is able to ask several questions: what really gives value to an image? His aesthetic, the artistic research behind it or the link between the subject and the viewer? It can heal doubts, like the one that pervades us when we see a photo of places that we think we have already seen. Maybe they only look like something we’ve already seen. 

Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography
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Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography
Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography
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