The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity

The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Photography

Andrew Kung is a young American artist based in Brooklyn who, after a couple of years in LinkedIn as a strategist and analyst, decided to leave the silicon valley and devote himself totally to photography.

His work was soon recognized and appreciated and now boasts collaborations with Vogue Italia, l’uomo vogue, i-d, dazed, paper magazine, new york times and many more.

The title of his latest project is The All-America, a photographic book that tells and illustrates the complex Asian-American male identity. Andrew had never really thought too much about his identity before or at least found it interesting only after traveling south to document the small Chinese population of Mississippi. There he realized how complex it is to be Asian living in America. So he decided to break with conventional stereotypes by providing a platform for those who felt unrepresented in mainstream culture. 

The book is divided into two parts: the first is a selection of images that investigate physical spaces “where Asian-American men have felt invisible”, the second celebrates “the beauty, intimacy, and tenderness of Asian-American men,” he says. Kung’s goal is not only to provide another avenue of representation in the fashion and photography industry but also to question the preconceptions of his audience, educating those “inside and outside the community on the nuanced experiences that all Asian-Americans have”.

The images are placed side by side, bringing to light the confluence of gender and sexuality; the paradox of a man who can be desexualized and over-sexualized at the same time.

Text by Giordana Bonanno.

The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity
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The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity
The All-America, the photographic book about the complex Asian-American male identity
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Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography

Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Photography

In English, Dead Ringer means a person or thing that looks a lot like another, a perfect duplicate. Portland photographer Clayton Cotterell has chosen this term as the title of one of his personal projects. 

Cotterell presents us with the state in which he lives, namely Oregon, its landscapes, but also the streets, the lights, the shapes that characterize this place. Desolated scenarios, at sunset, at dawn, in winter or in summer; evidence of the presence of man, a wall, a cd between the tall grass, a hand that caresses the water.

But once he finished shooting, the photographer realized that, without captions and titles, those images could have represented any other place. Dead Ringer is able to ask several questions: what really gives value to an image? His aesthetic, the artistic research behind it or the link between the subject and the viewer? It can heal doubts, like the one that pervades us when we see a photo of places that we think we have already seen. Maybe they only look like something we’ve already seen. 

Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer la fotografia universale di Clayton Cotterell | Collater.al
Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography
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Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography
Dead Ringer, Clayton Cotterell’s universal photography
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Julie Poly immortalizes today Ukraine in her pictures

Julie Poly immortalizes today Ukraine in her pictures

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 month ago · Photography

Julie Poly, aka Yulia Polyashchenko, was born in Stakhanov, Lugansk, and now lives in Kiev. Her style was strongly influenced by the projects of social documentary filmmaker Boris Mikhailov and her training at the Kharkiv School of Photography.

Combining her strong reportage imprint with her passion for studio photography, Julie has managed to find a personal narrative style that offers strong, well-maintained images. Her scenes interpret the cultural and visual codes of the typical everyday life in Ukraine; in particular, the themes of eroticism, fashion and new models of beauty are proposed.

The artist has stated on several occasions that she is constantly inspired by “trivial things, daily events, stories of friends’ lives and her own experience”.
Through an almost grotesque imaginary, Julie manages to communicate the lifestyle of her country in a contemporary and innovative way.

Take a look at the artist’s website here.

Julie Poly immortalizes today Ukraine in her pictures
Photography
Julie Poly immortalizes today Ukraine in her pictures
Julie Poly immortalizes today Ukraine in her pictures
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The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis

The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 month ago · Photography

Blaise Cepis is one of those photographers who would be able to make provocative situations and contexts far from the concept of sensuality. For the artist, eros hides everywhere and this loads his images with a strong sexual tension that permeates everything.

Women are the undisputed protagonists of her world, observed with the attitude of a voyeur, which reveals itself in a wild spirit capable of freeing itself from the impositions that the social custom of thinking wants to impose on us.

There is no doubt that such a consumerist and openly pop worldview has been influenced by David LaChapelle’s work. Blaise stands at the center as a mediator between the extreme style of the kitsch photographer and standard fashion commercial photography; it is no coincidence that the artist has worked with fashion system brands.

The sex-merch association is practically one of the fixed points of the current image society, but isn’t it a bit tired too? What do you think?

Take a look at our gallery.

The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis | Collater.al
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis
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The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis
The pop-provocative aesthetic by Blaise Cepis
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Blink, the new photographic project by Naohiro Maeda

Blink, the new photographic project by Naohiro Maeda

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 month ago · Photography

We met the photographer Naohiro Maeda with the project Passages, a suggestive conceptual representation of the spiritual journey that takes place when you lose a loved one. While maintaining the minimal and almost metaphysical aesthetic, Blink, the artist’s new project, presents itself to us as an ethereal set of images that combine landscapes and buildings to best express what it means to move to a new place.

It seems that Naohiro’s constant search is for the transition, from one city to another, from life to death in the case of Passages. Blink transcends various emotions: whether it’s euphoria for a new chapter in life in an unknown city or loneliness, combined with a feeling of isolation or otherness. All these feelings are nullified and revealed within images that represent fragments suspended in an indefinite time. The artist explained that:

“The series is a meditation on identity and otherness between the homeland and the new place.”

Naohiro Maeda contrasts the structures created by man against the oceans and still lakes, giving the whole series a surreal mood; it is no coincidence that the expression “the blink of an eye” is associated with the feeling that at a given moment you can really perceive the presence of a place.

Blink, the new photographic project by Naohiro Maeda
Photography
Blink, the new photographic project by Naohiro Maeda
Blink, the new photographic project by Naohiro Maeda
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