Vinilica vol. 110 – Dutch Nazari

Vinilica vol. 110 – Dutch Nazari

Cristiano Di Capua · 5 months ago · Music

Minimal but effective sound, like an arrow that hits you right in the chest.
This is “Fiore d’inverno”, the new single by Dutch Nazari (Undamento family), available on every digital stores from January 21st. It looks like a love song, although the range of themes touched by the Paduan singer-songwriter is much wider. A winter flower is an oxymoron, something that does not usually happen. This is the simile that the rapper orchestrates on a pop beat and well rhythmic to describe his own emotional revival as a result of a love affair ended badly but that does not devastate him and indeed gives him energy to face the winter and grow, despite everything: “outside it’s cold but I still grow”.

Dutch Nazari

Fiore d’inverno is a song born from a guitar riff, on which I then wrote the lyrics. The very first inspiration came from a book found on a bedside table in someone else’s house: Norwegian Wood by Murakami. I opened it to a random page and the first sentence I looked at contained the words “winter flower”. After a few minutes I had already written the first quatrain, the one that ends with “I can only find myself again when I lose myself, sprouting from the snow like a winter flower”. From there the theme of the piece was already in black and white, and over the next two days I wrote the rest.”

The artist class ’89 therefore continues to reinvent his artistic self, showing us a period of eclecticism that we hope will translate into other beautiful pieces to listen to. Eclecticism that however has intrigued us. That’s why Collater.al has decided to create in collaboration with Dutch a new Vinilica that will surely be able to scan the musical background with which he grew up and that formed him.

Vinilica vol. 110 – Dutch Nazari
Music
Vinilica vol. 110 – Dutch Nazari
Vinilica vol. 110 – Dutch Nazari
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All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness

All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness

Tommaso Berra · 3 days ago · Photography

Hosted this week by All for the Gram is not just a serial profile but an actual archive that collects details of an aesthetic that, however decayed, still holds great appeal. Soviet Innerness is a journey into Soviet design through the interiors of abandoned houses, amid torn wallpaper and cold, chipped tiles.

The wallpaper has been replaced in some cases by newspaper pages bearing news and photos from the 1980s, the peeling walls look like a layering of now-faded colors, as do the flower designs that once probably appeared more colorful.
The walls of Soviet Innerness are full of tired geometries, blocks of color and forms that always give the idea of unfinished, or of something that ended too quickly, leaving time for cracks to make everything look so beautiful and decadent.

The project curated by Elena Amabili and Alessandro Calvaresi describes the aesthetics of the Eastern Bloc and the themes that were present throughout the houses. There are illustrations on the walls of the countryside in USSR space, but also the great industrialization of communist cities and the memory of Misha, the popular mascot of the 1980 Moscow Olympics.

All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness
Photography
All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness
All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness
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Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport

Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport

Tommaso Berra · 3 days ago · Photography

It could not have been easy to fly a drone inside a 20-square-meter squash court, but photographer Brad Walls felt it was the only way to enhance geometry and movement in a few shots. The “Vacant” series depicts the geometry of bodies, moving a choreographed within scenes inspired by surrealism and retro-futurism.
The idea of choosing that particular location came from a visit by the artist to the squash court in which he played in his high school days. The empty space the lines of the field inspired the artist to create one of his aerial series, which had at its center the human body detached from the context but perfectly inserted into the geometric layout.

Squash | Collater.al

One of Brad Walls’ challenges was to avoid a claustrophobic effect, so white is the predominant color in the shots, repeated even in the models’ clothes, a choice that would make even Wimbledon organizers happy.
The clothes themselves are an element that reinforces the concept of retrofuturism, creating a tension between past and future through the inclusion of a futuristic wardrobe in an 80s context such as the squash court.
Looking forward to publishing his first book, due out in the fall and titled “Pools from Above,” Brad Walls defined “Vacant” as follows: “Geometry provides a hint at consistency in an ever inconsistent world. Innately, humans are drawn to it. Me, maybe more so”.

Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport
Photography
Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport
Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport
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Kaisar Ahamed and “a thousand of gardens” that no longer exists

Kaisar Ahamed and “a thousand of gardens” that no longer exists

Tommaso Berra · 2 days ago · Photography

The Hazaribagh district in the city of Daka, Bangladesh, means “the city of a thousand gardens” in the Farsi language, and the name gives an idea of what the landscape was like before leather factories polluted everything.
Photographer Kaisar Ahamed has chronicled in his latest project the landscape around the Buriganga River, rendered biologically dead by the poisons poured into the waters by the tanneries. The course of the river now appears as an unreal landscape, the setting for an apocalyptic film in which the dirty water becomes an element of terror rather than life.
Kaisar Ahamed is a chemist, but he chose to conduct his analysis of Hazaribagh’s water through photography. He took water samples taken from the Buriganga River at different locations, building a kind of laboratory in which photography helps tell the story of an environmental disaster.
The title “A Thousand of Gardens” thus sounds somewhat ironic, a mockery to which the viewer is immediately made aware.

You can support the publication of a volume dedicated to the work of photographer Kaisar Ahamed through the fundraiser launched by SelfSelf, click here to find out how you can help make this photography project a reality.

Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed | Collater.al
Kaisar Ahamed and “a thousand of gardens” that no longer exists
Photography
Kaisar Ahamed and “a thousand of gardens” that no longer exists
Kaisar Ahamed and “a thousand of gardens” that no longer exists
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A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon

A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

A world without “when I was your age it was different,” without “the youth of today are worthless,” a world in which therefore there is no “adultsplanning” and children seem to be able to do everything in total autonomy.
This is the landscape depicted in photography by Julie Blackmon, an American artist associated with family issues and small-town life.
The shots are social satire disguised within everyday scenes in which children are the real protagonists, not to say the only ones. All the details depicted are symbolic, as is the arrangement of the subjects, inspired by scenes painted by 17th-century Flemish painters.
Julie Blackmon’s goal is to represent the context of small American communities, tracing the dreams promoted by the American model.

One characteristic of Julie Blackmon’s children is their total detachment from anything related to contemporary technology. Thus they can be found playing “like in the old days,” painting the driveway with chalk, or in the handcrafted swimming pool in their own backyard.
Of inspiration for the photographer’s vision is the context of large families, being herself the eldest of nine siblings. In doing so she traces memories and what more generally influences childhood, made up of landscapes and elements that shape the way we think even as adults, those that Julie does not want to represent, deliberately leaving the feeling of a world in which everything is disconnected.

A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon
Photography
A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon
A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon
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