The 10 most controversial fashion campaigns

The 10 most controversial fashion campaigns

Andrea Tuzio · 3 years ago · Style

The fashion world has always made provocation, transgression and breaking the rules a strong point. Challenging conventions and consequently provoking controversy is almost the order of the day.
The campaigns of fashion houses have often been accused of exasperation and exaggeration, of provocation to the limits of decency or irresponsibility.

So we decided to put together the 10 most controversial campaigns in the fashion world.

Tom Ford Fragrance For Men – Terry Richardson 2007

This 2007 advertising campaign shot by Terry Richardson dedicated to Tom Ford‘s first men’s perfume, has been the subject of much criticism and has been banned in many countries around the world.

Sisley – Terry Richardson 2001

The famous 2001 Sisley campaign, once again shot by the controversial photographer Terry Richardson, was banned because of his daring and driven imagination.

United Colors of Benetton “UNHATE” – 2011

In the foreground the kiss on the mouth between Joseph Ratzinger and the Imam of the Cairo Al Ahzar mosque, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed El-Tayeb, for the campaign signed United Colors of Benetton “UNHATE”. The reaction of the Vatican arrived within a few hours, defining the photograph “unacceptable”, the company removed it also because the giant picture of the kiss was posted on Ponte Sant’Angelo in Rome, very near St. Peter’s.

Gucci “Public Enemy” – Mario Testino 2003

The campaign shot by one of the most important and revered fashion photographers of all time, Mario Testino, starring model Carmen Kass showed Gucci‘s “G” on Kass’s groin and was censored amid many controversies.

United Colors of Benetton – David Kirby’s Final Moment 1992

The photo that Luciano Benetton and his consultant Oliviero Toscani chose for the 1992 campaign to sensitize public opinion and especially young people to the AIDS, which in those years claimed millions of victims mainly for lack of information and awareness of the real danger of the syndrome, is harsh, crude and highly controversial. This photo taken by David Kirby changed forever the perception of AIDS all over the world.

Miu Miu – Spring/Summer 2015

Taken by Steven Meisel the Miu Miu SS15 campaign was labeled “irresponsible” because it showed what could be mistaken for a little girl in a sexually suggestive pose. The model of the photograph is Mia Goth who at the time of the shot was 22 years old but, despite the age of the protagonist, the campaign was withdrawn.

United Colors of Benetton – 1992

The union Benetton/Oliviero Toscani made a lot of discussion during the 18 years of partnership and in 1992 the Milanese photographer chose the theme of the death penalty for the company’s campaign. A photograph of an empty electric chair to raise public awareness of a problem unfortunately still unresolved.

Sisley – Terry Richardson 2003

The Brazilian super model Ana Beatriz Barros photographed by Terry Richardson in 2003 for the Sisley campaign was opposed and finally banned because of the provocative and sexually explicit imagery inherent in the shot.

Dolce & Gabbana – Spring/Summer 2007

Heavy criticism and cancellation for this very controversial Dolce & Gabbana campaign. The photo of the model Alessandra Ambrosio surrounded by 4 models was banned everywhere after her release in Spain also thanks to the indignation that arose because of the imagery related to rape that the shot seems to suggest.

Calvin Klein Jeans – Steven Meisel 1995

The CK Jeans campaign of 1995, shot in a wooden basement by Steven Meisel, immediately caused a stir. He accused the look of the models that seemed to be very young and photographed in sexually blinking poses with clear transparencies.

The 10 most controversial fashion campaigns
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The 10 most controversial fashion campaigns
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A-COLD-WALL* and Converse, a new collaboration

A-COLD-WALL* and Converse, a new collaboration

Andrea Tuzio · 3 years ago · Style

Yesterday the A-COLD-WALL* brand published on its Instagram profile an image announcing the upcoming release of a new collaboration with Converse.

View this post on Instagram

ACW* X CONVERSE

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The photo puts together the two logos of the brands involved in the collaboration and offers us a cue for reflection on what could come from the joint venture. The logos are placed on a gray background that fades from top to bottom as if they were a black and white photocopy, while the lines at the top and bottom and in the center of the image are a clear reference to the geometric and contemporary approach of Samuel Ross, founder of A-COLD-WALL.
The caption reads “ACW X CONVERSE”, nothing more. We’ll have to wait a little longer to get more information.

A-COLD-WALL* and Converse, a new collaboration
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A-COLD-WALL* and Converse, a new collaboration
A-COLD-WALL* and Converse, a new collaboration
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The new collaboration among CdG HOMME and New Balance

The new collaboration among CdG HOMME and New Balance

Andrea Tuzio · 3 years ago · Style

For this Fall/Winter 2020 the HOMME line of COMME des GARÇONS and New Balance have just released a new sneaker in collaboration.
Junya Watanabe reworks the concept of minimalist workwear typical of the HOMME collections and applies it to the New Balance Pro Court Cup available in two very sober coloraway, black and white.

Simplicity is at the heart of the work of COMME des GARÇONS HOMME and New Balance, the contrasting stitching of the midsole and the leather upper reflect Watanabe’s vintage style, the only note that we could call showy is the “CdGH” logo embossed on the top of the heel, the “N” logo is obviously on the outside of the silhouette.

We do not know the release date yet but the sneaker should be released at a price around 230 euro.

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The bandana, emblem of hip hop aesthetics

The bandana, emblem of hip hop aesthetics

Andrea Tuzio · 3 years ago · Style

The bandana‘s incredible versatility is unique, an accessory that has crossed different cultures, continents and generations, bringing with it equally different meanings and perceptions.
The hip hop culture, from the 80s until today, has made the bandana a symbol of rap style and aesthetics, placed in the back pockets of baggy jeans, tied around the neck or forehead.

It seems that the word “bandana” comes from Sanskrit “bandhana”, which meant binding, tying, ribbon and then be transformed into “bāṅdhnū” in Hindi language that means to attack, tie together.

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The history of the bandana is not very clear, one theory goes back to the end of the 17th century in South Asia and the Middle East, while another one speaks of its first use in the Old West, then around the middle of the 19th century. It was mainly used to cover nose and mouth to protect from dust or as a sort of mask to avoid being recognized by thieves and outlaws.

From here we move on to the present day where the bandana has been and continues to be used by many sub-cultures but also as a sign of recognition by gangs in American big cities.

In Los Angeles, for example, the Bloods and Crips gangs wore red and blue bandanas respectively as a symbol to show their appetite to one or the other gang. This type of use, like other aesthetic elements of the Los Angeles gangs, was borrowed from the Chicano style of the 60s and 70s.

The mixture between gangs and the Los Angeles hip hop scene has made the bandana an omnipresent element in the photographs and videos of Californian rappers such as Snoop Dogg for example, but also from those of the East Coast, Mobb Deep and the Wu-Tang Clan, Notorious B.I.G. and above all Tupac Shakur, have made this accessory a symbol of hip hop aesthetics still widely used today.

An example of how the bandana has entered the collective imagination and has also conquered the streetwear world is the photo taken in 2006 for Supreme at Dipset (or The Diplomats) by photographer Kenneth Cappello, who ended up on a photo tee that became a cult.

The paisley print has then conquered the workwear market and high-profile vintage-inspired, just think of KAPITAL and visvim brands that have built entire collections on the typical print of bandanas turning it into an absolute must-have for every fan.

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IUTER’s FW20, a tribute to Italian motor racing

IUTER’s FW20, a tribute to Italian motor racing

Andrea Tuzio · 3 years ago · Style

IUTER presented the Fall/Winter 2020 collection that pays tribute to the immortal icons of Italian motor racing.
“Vita Veloce” is a collection in collaboration with three Piedmontese realities that have engraved their names in the motor racing scene, LANCIA, SPARCO and ABARTH.

The one with LANCIA is a work centered on the legendary Lancia Delta HF Integrale, a car able to win 5 World Constructors’ titles between 1988 and 1993 in the World Rally Championship, writing unforgettable pages of history for the Italian manufacturer. Photos of old advertising campaigns, the iconic red elephant – symbol of the HF Integrale – and the classic HF logos decorate some of the items in the collection.

SPARCO, a company specializing in the production of technical clothing for the world’s major motorsport competitions, a pioneer brand in the production of fire retardant suits for drivers and ABARTH, owned by FIAT and still today synonymous with speed and power, are the other two companies protagonists of IUTER’s FW20 “Vita Veloce” collection.

There is also another brand that completes the series of collaborations in this collection, U.P.W.W. , a division of the safety apparel company Utility Pro. A New York based company but founded by Italian photographer Alessandro “Zuek” Simonetti that in its collections makes the aesthetics and functionality of workwear and the artistic side of its founder coexist thanks to silkscreen prints, patches and appliqués.

All items of the collection are designed and produced in Italy, the choice and care in treating materials such as silk, leather and cotton, the attention to details and the ironic and playful graphics fully represent the philosophy and soul of the brand.

IUTER’s Fall/Winter 2020 “Vita Veloce” collection is a true tribute to the legacy of Italian motoring.

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