Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple

Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple

Claudia Fuggetti · 5 months ago · Art

Anya-Lee Temple‘s NSFW illustrations are as alluring and flirtatious as their creator. The Instagram @anyaleeart account presents itself to the public as a sort of diary where the artist alternates her works with provocative self-shots that almost always have her body as their subject.

Just on Instagram we find what is the slogan of the artist bodypositive | self positive”, the message is quite clear: there is no eros without love for themselves. You always have to considerate the positive side.

The sensuality of the images is played down by the constant of the millennial pink solid background. The sinuous and charming shapes are very reminiscent of a kind of eroticism that can be traced back to a sort of modern Lolita, citing Nabokov’s masterpiece:

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta”.

Have a look at the Anya-Lee Temple shop here.

Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple | Collater.al
Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple
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Body positive: NSFW illustrations by Anya-Lee Temple
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Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence

Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence

Giulia Guido · 5 months ago · Art

From Wednesday 5 to Sunday 30 May, the Spazio CORNER MAXXI of the Museo nazionale delle Arti del XXI secolo, in Rome, will open its doors to host the second edition of the exhibition Re:Humanism – Re:define the Boundaries.

Ten artists will investigate the relationship between Artificial Intelligence and contemporary art, inviting to reflect on a future increasingly linked to technology in all its aspects. For this reason, the works will touch on themes related to society, but also to biodiversity, ecological awareness, gender identity. 

WHAT:
Re:Humanism – Re:define the Boundaries
WHEN:
5 – 30 MAY
WHERE:
Spazio CORNER MAXXI, Museo nazionale delle Arti del XXI secolo (RomE)

The artists in the exhibition will be the Entangled Others, Yuguang Zhang, Johanna Bruckner, Irene Fenara, the collective Umanesimo Artificiale, the duo composed by Elizabeth Christoforetti & Romy El Sayah, Mariagrazia Pontorno, Egor Kraft, Numero Cromatico and Carola Bonfili, and their projects in the exhibition are the winners of Re:Humanism Art Prize

The relationship between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence is a theme that can not be ignored and, in addition to making us discover worlds and technologies far from our daily lives, can give rise to a healthy debate on the future of art and beyond.
We at Collater.al were lucky enough to ask a few questions to Daniela Cotimbo, curator and President of the association Re:Humanism, who told us what we will find in the exhibition and her point of view on the subject. Don’t miss the interview below and some images of the works and visit the official website to find out all the Infos!

Before talking about the exhibition, let’s talk a bit about you. Your research has always focused on the analysis and investigation of issues related to the present through different and new means of expression and through new technologies. Where do your interest in this subject and these themes come from?

The fascination for the world of technology has always been part of me, I think. I belong to that generation of people who have seen the spread of the Internet and subsequent technologies connected through devices such as smartphones, PCs and more. Behind what seem to be simple tools I read all the complexity of human progress and its social implications. If art has accompanied me throughout my school career, technology has entered in an important way in my research, starting from my three-year thesis, where I explored the worlds of art within Second Life. The approach to artificial intelligence, on the other hand, was born from my meeting with Alan Advantage, the company that promoted the prize, which from the beginning stimulated me with transversal themes and deeper technical knowledge. Today I believe it is really difficult to keep technology out of humanistic discourse.

From May 5 to 30 “Re:Humanism – Re:define the boundaries” will open its doors, what will a person who decides to visit the exhibition find in front of him?

Good question, certainly not a canonical exhibition, in the sense that if you expect to be surrounded by robots, cables and computers (although I love the aesthetics of technology) you might be disappointed. In fact, this award is a testament to how technological languages such as AI are slowly penetrating more and more into the fabric of contemporary art. Artists are using them both as an end in themselves, to better understand their nature and implications, and as a tool to support their ideas or imagine new types of interfaces. Thus, it may happen to see in the exhibition a tapestry that makes us reflect on the concept of extinction of tigers (Irene Fenara), an aquarium populated by a coral reef generated by algorithms (Entangled Others), a bed animated by a non-human gesture (Yuguang Zhang) or the sound recall of a modified DNA (Artificial Humanism). On the contrary, there are other works that tell how artificial intelligence helps us to revisit ancient languages such as Chinese painting (Egor Kraft), the untranslatable Voynich manuscript (Mariagrazia Pontorno) or the poetic verses contained in epitaphs (Numero Cromatico). Finally, there are works that exploit the language and culture that revolve around AI to imagine new forms of relationship between species (Johanna Bruckner), between body and space (Elizabeth Christoforetti & Romy El Sayah) and existence within the digital (Carola Bonfili).

re:humanism
Molecular Sex, Johanna Bruckner

When you try to relate distant and separate disciplines, such as art and new technologies, something extraordinary is often born, but not everyone can understand it right away. How would you explain to these people the need to create new ways of artistic production?

On this we must make a premise, art has always gone hand in hand with what we used to call technique and that today through technological advancement has become a real language. When, for example, cave painting was born, someone understood that he could use tools or his own body to communicate with others in a symbolic language. If we think about this in relation to technology, we realize that what we are witnessing is nothing more than a natural process of evolution of art as an expression of the reality that surrounds us. Certainly technology today runs faster than ever and it is not always easy to keep up with new discoveries and the latest developments. However, it is an effort that needs to be made because the implications, and here I am referring especially to AI, are so many and now concern us very closely. Perhaps the opposite is true, namely that it is the art that, by subverting the rules of the game, helps us to better understand technology.

Among the works that will be on display, the one that attracted my attention the most is “Epitaphs for the human artist” by Numero Cromatico. It is a sort of epitaph that definitively decrees the death of the human artist. Do you think that this figure will disappear completely in the future or do you think that the human artist will resist in time but will have to share the role of the creator with technological devices, artificial intelligence and algorithms?

Numero Cromatico’s work acts on several semantic levels. It certainly helps us reflect on how poetic forms that have been handed down spontaneously, such as the verses normally contained in epitaphs, in the very near future will be totally the prerogative of algorithms. The point, again, is not whether it will be the human artist who will disappear but how these forms of expression will be passed on to us. Are we willing to entrust an intimate memory such as the one that accompanies our lives to an AI? And if so, how will we experience it? To answer your question even better, AI algorithms already have a very developed “creative” potential, the so called “Black Box”, a latent semantic space that is not yet clear to us how it is able to process the data we give it. All this is very fascinating but the real question we should ask ourselves is: what is art “for” and why should an AI replace an artist in this sense? The answer I can give myself today is that AI enhances the creative possibilities of an artist in so many ways that I am very curious to explore.

Re:Humanism
Epitaphs For The Human Artist, Numero Cromatico

In the last few years, and especially in the last few months, we are noticing how not only artistic production is becoming more and more linked to the technological world, but also the sale and fruition of art are becoming more digital. Do you think that in this way, in the long run, art will be more accessible to everyone or, on the contrary, will it become more exclusive?

I guess you are referring in particular to the rise of NFTs (Non-fungible tokens) which at this moment represent a very interesting phenomenon within the art world and beyond. Personally, I don’t like sectorizations, I think that technology is now part of the tools available to artists but certainly, not being neutral tools, every time we introduce one we have to expand our gaze to the context of production. I mention NFTs because they actually represent a nice paradigm shift, they push us to conceive art no longer as an object, something to be owned necessarily in a physical way, in most cases we are talking about digital formats that can be presented on screens but also simply be stored in a folder on our PC. Certainly a technology of this kind is revolutionizing the way we approach art, favoring the rise of new types of collectors and enthusiasts. However, we must specify that these collective phenomena could be temporary and due to the initial enthusiasm, what could easily happen is that everything returns to the canons of the traditional art market. So, to answer you, I have to say that the complexity of contemporary art is not something we can renounce to and it is not said that technologies facilitate the access to complex contents, however I believe in a greater need by artists to measure themselves with the themes of our time and this, probably can really facilitate this encounter with the public.

Re:Humanism
(Non-)Human: The Moving Bedsheet, Yuguang Zhang
re:humanism
Body As Building, Elizabeth Bowie Christoforetti & Romy El Sayah
Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence
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The unusual basketball hoops by Yongwook Seong

The unusual basketball hoops by Yongwook Seong

Giulia Guido · 5 months ago · Art

There are objects that are part of our everyday life, but of which we do not know the history or origins. One of these is definitely the basketball hoop.
We see it in viral videos in which NBA players hang from it, we see it in the fields around the house, we see it in TV commercials of sports brands, the most passionate can see it even in the trash can (raise your hand if at least once you did not feel Steph Curry hitting the basket with a rolled up piece of paper). 

In short, we see it everywhere, yet we know so little about this object. 

It is from this curiosity that the project “The Hoops” by Yongwook Seong, an artist and visual designer based in Banff, Canada, was born. 

When James Naismith invented basketball in 1891, players had to throw the ball into two fishing baskets hanging from opposite sides of a gymnasium. Initially, the lack of rules led to players kicking and punching their way around the court, which led Naismith to develop a rulebook. 

During the years of the Second World War, thanks to Naismith and the YMCA (Young Men’s Christian Association) to which he belonged, basketball in America had an exponential growth, transforming itself from a regional sport to a national sport. 

“The Hoops” starts precisely from the object of the basket and reinvents and revisits it in both form and context. In this way, Yongwook Seong has created a series of graphics in which different hoops of unusual design are placed in unusual environments such as in the middle of the desert, the ocean or on a beach. 

“The Hoops” is to retrace the genealogy of basketball, and explore alternative designs that would have been missed out during the war time. The designer ironically places each redesigned hoop in a natural surrounding, therefore experimenting an “anomaly” and unravelling its alternative stories.”

‘four-legged mcpider hoop’ lands on mars; playing basketball on mars would be a vastly different experience with a third of earth’s gravity
Yongwook Seong
‘karkinos’ hides under the beach, the giant crab from greek mythology is afraid of the attack of heracles after biting his foot
Yongwook Seong
‘good morning’, said the desert flower
Yongwook Seong
‘walrusaurus’ is inspired by inuit mythology: the creator-god, anguta, was angered by the attack of sedna and chopped her fingers into the sea, which later became walruses and seals
Yongwook Seong
‘sarracenia bird’ attracts prey into its pitcher by its smell and color, once digested and full, it flies away

Leggi anche: “Kintsugi Court”, il campo in oro riqualificato da Victor Solomon

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The new eight modern classics volumes from HarperCollins

The new eight modern classics volumes from HarperCollins

Federica Cimorelli · 5 months ago · Art

The British branch of the New York-based publishing house HarperCollins, its non-fiction arm William Collins, and the London-based publisher 4th Estate announced a new collaboration a few days ago. The project has been launched with a brand new publication that brings in a collection the eight most significant modern classics of recent times.

Among the selected titles are Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides, No Logo by Naomi Klein, Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks, Wild Swans by Jung Chang and Other Minds by Peter Godfrey-Smith. These are classic texts that shed light on the human experience enriched by a simple and brilliant design by artist Jo Thomson.

– Read also: Heath Kane redesigns George Orwell’s literary classics

The new editions bring with them a new series of covers decorated with contrasting colours and timeless graphics. Each book has its own unique colour palette and also tells something of the story it represents through its shapes and designs.

The eight volumes from HarperCollins will be available for purchase from 13 May 2021. Preview the covers here and visit the official website to keep up to date with the sale.

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All for the Gram – Agenzia Stanca

All for the Gram – Agenzia Stanca

Federica Cimorelli · 5 months ago · Art

Do you also work in digital marketing? Welcome to the club, after all, we all look alike. We can always recognise each other as colleagues, partly because of their dark circles, partly because of their attitude, but above all because of their language.
In an agency, in fact, some sayings often make no sense, and yet they return. There are new words coined and a dictionary invented, but strangely shared by all.
For a few months now, Agenzia Stanca has been telling everyone about it, and doing so in a simple and direct way: ironically sharing on Instagram those dynamics that are repeated every day in the workplace.

Since we don’t have enough of hearing such phrases every day, we also put them in writing.

Rischeduliamo”, “Mi torna tutto”, “Lato nostro”, “A stretto giro”. It is useless to deny it, you too will have said it at least once before feeling terribly stupid. That’s why we like Agenzia Stanca: because it allows us to laugh at our troubles, discover some new trends and correct our shortcomings.

We’ve selected some of our favourite phrases for you, but to make sure you don’t miss out on new publications, follow the profile on Instagram.

Discover more Instagram profiles to follow HERE

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