Camera Selfies, when cameras take a selfie to themselves

Camera Selfies, when cameras take a selfie to themselves

Claudia Fuggetti · 2 years ago · Photography

But, what are the selfies for if not to document the history of photography? Probably the German photographer J. Flynn Newton must have thought just that, when he decided to realize the project Camera Selfies.

According to the artist, in fact, today photography is no longer special, it is no longer a novelty accessible to few as in the past. Our phones can take high quality images like a camera would, everything becomes easy and is no longer magic. Using old cameras, J. Flynn wants to preserve the authenticity of the practice and the beauty of these objects:

“I wanted to make very intimate “self-portraits” to capture their “personality”.

Camera Selfies is an attempt to remember how incredible is the invention of photography, which manages to capture time. The visual bombardment of which we are victims, conscious or not, makes us apathetic and insensitive to this fascinating artistic practice.

J. Flynn started photographing at the age of 6 with an Agfa Silette he still owns; he currently lives in Germany and works as a designer in his agency.

Have a look at her Instagram profile here.

Camera Selfies, le macchine fotografiche si fanno un selfie | Collater.al
Camera Selfies, le macchine fotografiche si fanno un selfie | Collater.al
Camera Selfies, le macchine fotografiche si fanno un selfie | Collater.al
Camera Selfies, le macchine fotografiche si fanno un selfie | Collater.al
Camera Selfies, le macchine fotografiche si fanno un selfie | Collater.al
Camera Selfies, when cameras take a selfie to themselves
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Camera Selfies, when cameras take a selfie to themselves
Camera Selfies, when cameras take a selfie to themselves
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The importance of the body in the shots of Anouk Brouwer

The importance of the body in the shots of Anouk Brouwer

Giulia Guido · 7 hours ago · Art, Photography

The only universal language is that of the body. If a person tells us in a language we don’t know that they’re sad, we’re not able to, but if they’re crying we immediately understand their mood. 
Our body is a very powerful means to convey thoughts, emotions and feelings, we just need to know how to use it. Anouk Brouwer certainly knows how to do it, and her photographs are undeniable proof of this. 

Anouk Brouwer was born in 1993 in the Netherlands and after years of studies that took her around the world, from The New York Film Academy to The Amsterdam Fashion Institute & Ryerson School of Fashion, today she lives and works in Tokyo. 
Her degrees in acting and fashion, combined with her constant search for ways to express herself, have led her to shoot images in which the performance of the body becomes pure art. 

– Read also: Geometries of the body in Lin Yung Cheng’s shots

In her series “Irrationality“, inspired by the story of two artists who fall in love despite speaking two different languages, we find this use of the human body perfectly. The bodies of Solène and Lin touch each other, brush against each other, interlock in a game that needs no words. 

But Anouk Brouwer’s work does not end with photography. A year ago, in fact, she made her first short film, entitled “Body Language” in which the protagonist expresses her values and feelings only through her movements. 

Check out “Body Language” below and follow Anouk Brouwer on Instagram so you don’t miss out on her upcoming work!

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Art
The importance of the body in the shots of Anouk Brouwer
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Cinematography – Euphoria

Cinematography – Euphoria

Giordana Bonanno · 2 days ago · Photography

It’s been more than a year since the 2019 release of Euphoria, an HBO series written and scripted by Sam Levinson, but some are still wondering if it’s “the best series about adolescence since Skins” – maybe it is? What is certain, however, is the growing success and superlative reviews it continues to garner following the December 6 release of the special episode about the main character Rue.

We previously told you the story here, today we return to it by analyzing the dynamic and fascinating aesthetic of the footage and comparing it to the photography of Laura Lobos, whose goal is to depict the life, everyday life and interpersonal relationships of the new generation.

Both stories feature young boys as protagonists, but what makes them exciting in the eyes of the viewer and memorable over time is that they are universal expressions of feelings, concerns, and states of mind regardless of age. Euphoria’s success is also due to the themes it deals with: addiction, gender change, toxic masculinity, body positivity. These are the issues that unite the characters and the audience, “I think part of the experience of growing up, getting through high school, is realizing that any person is going to go through some shitty times. That you are the way you are because of the traumas you’ve overcome. Or not.” said director Levinson.

Marcell Rév, on the other hand, is the director of photography who recreated a beautifully stylized aesthetic to tap into the inner world of the teens. For the color palette, they kept changes simple but impactful, “It has to be colored a certain way, to feel that elevation. But we didn’t want it to look like the colors of the rainbow, or without a real system. So, most of the time, we use primary colors, and I rely a lot on the orange-blue color contrast, which is really key,” says the cinematographer. “We use it in both night and daytime scenes.” Real emotional realism.

Another stylistic feature to highlight is the sophisticated camera movement that recurs especially in the first season, from highly cinematic lighting to a saturated color palette.

In the meantime, a preview of the second special episode dedicated to Jules has been released, due out on January 24th. We can not wait to find out what happens next, in the meantime let us be accompanied by the soundtrack of Labrinth as we browse some frames from the film and photographs of @lauralobos.

Did you know: Hunter Schafer got an audition via Instagram and it’s her acting debut.

Genre: Drama
Director: Sam Levinson
Director of photography: Marcell Rév
Stars: Hunter Schafer, Zendaya, Maude Apatow

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Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare

Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare

Giulia Guido · 2 days ago · Art, Photography

Born in 1994, Caroline Dare is a young American artist and photographer who now lives and works in Sydney, Australia. Her passion for photography was born when she was still a child and by pure chance, she took some pictures of one of her sisters. 

From that moment on, her love for the lens has never abandoned her and, since she shot with an analogue camera, neither has her love for film. 

Caroline Dare doesn’t set limits for herself: in addition to photographing herself and boys and girls in their intimacy, in stolen moments and on the move, she often shoots her surroundings, whether it’s the landscape seen from the window or a simple object. Anything can prove to be the ideal subject for the perfect shot. 

The thick grain of the film blends with the colors and nuances of the shots that range from yellow to blue to red. Caroline’s are spontaneous photographs that speak to us of freedom, of the body and mind, and of femininity. 

Discover below a selection of her shots and follow Caroline Dare on Instagram not to miss all her work. 

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Naomi Anderson Subryan, an extravagant collage artist

Naomi Anderson Subryan, an extravagant collage artist

Collater.al Contributors · 2 days ago · Art

Naomi Anderson Subryan is a British illustrator, collage artist and ceramicist with an eccentric and quirky style. After graduating in illustration from Camberwell College of Arts in London, Naomi began her career as a freelance artist working with clients large and small. Her unique style and original aesthetic have made her a sought-after artist and she is now one of the most exciting young talents on the London scene.

In addition to making cute and quirky ceramic objects, Naomi Anderson Subryan stands out on the scene for her extraordinary paper collages. By mixing shapes, colors, textures and materials, the British artist transforms paper into small silhouettes and turns each of her creations into a lively work of art.
Her works look very simple but conceal a long production process. The collages require an intense tactile process and a deep connection with materials, images and shapes.

– Read also: Eiko Ojala minimal paper art

The subjects of her creations are often humans, animals, familiar personalities and characters from films and TV series. Naomi takes inspiration from her surroundings, reinterprets the images, exaggerates with colors and transforms the familiar into something new.

We’ve selected her flashiest collages here, but to see them all, follow her on Instagram or visit her personal website.

Words by Federica Cimorelli

Naomi Anderson Subryan, an extravagant collage artist
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