Architerror. An Instagram profile of big mistakes

Architerror. An Instagram profile of big mistakes

Collater.al Contributors · 5 months ago · Design

There are millions of architectural platforms by now. Millions! Every day in our endless scrolling on Instagram, in our ”Home” or in our “Explore” tool, we see beautiful and perfect architecture or maybe some special apartment with a very good interior design, maybe the face of the Archi- star that designed the new Tower in Manhattan or the new concrete house in Tokyo by a famous Japanese architect. Are you tired of so much beauty? Is that a bit boring? Are you looking for a new architectural wave? Well, Architerror is the solution for you.

We say stop to symmetry, beauty, proportion and yes to weirdo things: a church that looks like Jesus, a facade full of LV by Louis Vuitton marks and many more. Buildings that have an animal or human shapes, impossible and bandy windows, the revival of the Roman Greek style: everything! Architerror is a melting pot of weirdo architectural things. If you are tired of the usual Instagram profiles of architecture, this is the one for you.

Text by Bianca Felicori

Architerror. An Instagram profile of big mistakes
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Architerror. An Instagram profile of big mistakes
Architerror. An Instagram profile of big mistakes
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Nendo and the marble that melts on itself

Nendo and the marble that melts on itself

Collater.al Contributors · 5 months ago · Design

If marble is a hard and smooth limestone material, the project born from the collaboration between the japanese Studio Nendo and Marsotto Edizioni aims to discuss its compositional characteristics.

The result is a collection of linear and sharp-edged furniture, pedestals, platforms with rounded edges and surfaces that melt like wax or ripple like water. The objects seem to sink into pools of water, melting and transforming into them.

Nendo is synonymous with innovation and inconsuetude, and these two key words also dominate this project.

Text by Elisa Scotti

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Homecore commissions Studio Malka Architecture for the new store in Paris

Homecore commissions Studio Malka Architecture for the new store in Paris

Collater.al Contributors · 5 months ago · Design

Homecore was born in France 25 years ago as the first streetwear brand. This year it needed to renew its image and commissioned Studio Malka Architecture to design the new store in Les Champs-Elysèes. The project is inspired by the Krylon logo – a historic brand of spray paints – and the Homecore concept of color therapy. The obvious reference to graffiti and the mantra linked to this culture “Peace, love, unity and fun”.

The facade is composed of seven arches from which the entire chromatic axis that fills the shop unwinds, just like the shadows of a figure resting on the ground. The openings take on the colors of Newton’s prism. The result is, therefore, a shop completely flooded with primary and secondary colors, the tangible, physical representation of this chromatic circle from which each color overlap generates another, each chromatic section gives its own identity to space just as a material would do.

Red is added to blue and generates purple, or to yellow it generates orange. Each radiation corresponds to the index of refraction and each intersection is the addition of the colors of the circle that are transformed.

Text by Elisa Scotti

Homecore commissions Studio Malka Architecture for the new store in Paris
Design
Homecore commissions Studio Malka Architecture for the new store in Paris
Homecore commissions Studio Malka Architecture for the new store in Paris
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Otherworld, the multisensory arcade bar designed by Red Deer

Otherworld, the multisensory arcade bar designed by Red Deer

Collater.al Contributors · 5 months ago · Design

The Red Deer collective of architects designed Otherworld. Created under a railway arch, the perception of reality will be quickly destabilized for total immersion, all thanks to the maxi screens and the light effects they create inside the place.

It is a new generation bar, an “arcade bar” that offers an incredible experience, allowing the user to live in virtual reality in a truly original environment. Each player will have their own room to dive and have fun with their friends. Travelling in parallel dimensions, between one game and the next customers can enjoy a homemade beer, a cocktail or a coffee in a futuristic atmosphere.

Otherworld l’arcade bar multisensoriale progettato da Red Deer | Collater.al

The multi-sensory rooms mix, along with the visual effects, those olfactory and not only – you can also feel the warmth of the wind and the scents related to the worlds to explore. With minimalist interiors, light will dominate the decorations. The gradient colours of the neon lights subtly break up the corners and shapes of the space. With this system, Red Deer wanted to open up the space to a wider audience than those associated with the stereotypical arcade games of the 80s.

“You feel the sun falling on your face as you leave the cave. You feel the wind in your hair as you slide down a vast mountain. Feel the thud under the feet of a new land to explore. “Come in and leave it all behind…”

The place is in Haggerstone, London. What are you waiting for?

Text by Elisa Scotti

Otherworld, the multisensory arcade bar designed by Red Deer
Design
Otherworld, the multisensory arcade bar designed by Red Deer
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Frank L. Wright and the UNESCO World Heritage buildings

Frank L. Wright and the UNESCO World Heritage buildings

Collater.al Contributors · 5 months ago · Design

Eight architectural projects by Frank Lloyd Wright have been selected for inclusion on the UNESCO World Heritage List

“The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright” is the name under which these projects were brought together. It had already been applied for in 2015, but for some reason, the decision was postponed until yesterday, July 7, when the final verdict was issued. 2019 World Heritage Meeting, is the venue where the eight buildings were proclaimed, underway in Baku in Azerbaijan. 

Wright is considered one of the pioneers, along with Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, etc. … of the modern movement of architecture.

Here is a list of the eight buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, located in six different American states – Arizona, California, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York and Wisconsin – in chronological order:

Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois (built 1906-1909) 

A building built on the theme of reflection on space and materials. Wright uses and repeats the same form: square plan and cubic volume formed not by walls but by equivalent forms obtained with formworks. The second volume proposes the scheme of the first, changing the general dimension and the ratio of openings.

Frederick C. Robie House, Chicago, Illinois (built 1910)

Conceived as two large rectangles that seem to slide side by side, the long horizontal residence that Wright created for Frederick Robie has boldly established a new form of domestic design: the Prairie style.

Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin (construction 1911-1959)

The house is built with local materials. Local farmers helped Wright move the stone from the nearby yellow limestone quarry, which he then mixed with the sand from the river to create the walls of Taliesin. The plaster for the interior walls was mixed with the Siena, providing a golden hue that reflects the pastoral setting. Taliesin has many architectural elements that have become Wright’s trademark: the cantilevered roofs, the large windows, and the open plan. The architect worked there for the whole time he lived there, about 50 years.

Hollyhock House, Los Angeles, California (built 1918-1921)

Leaning on a 36-acre hill in East Hollywood, the first and best-known West Coast design challenges stylistic categorization. Barnsdall, the client, wanted a residence halfway between home and garden, and inspired the numerous terraces, colonnades and pergolas that unite the interior and exterior spaces of the Hollyhock House. 

Fallingwater, Mill Run, Pennsylvania (built 1936-1939)

It is the flagship of organic architecture of Wright and is considered the best for the architecture of this style, by the American Institute of Architects. Its owners, Edgar and Liliane Kaufmann, were a prominent couple from Pittsburgh, renowned for their characteristic sense of style and taste. A series of “trays” in concrete reinforced with natural rock. The cantilevered terraces of local sandstone blend harmoniously with the rock formations and seem to float above the stream below. Wright has designed an additional guesthouse located on the hill directly above the main house and connected by a covered walkway. 

Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House, Madison, Wisconsin (built 1936-1937)

It is a modest one-storey structure, with the exterior finished in a combination of bricks, horizontal panels and glass doors, the latter open from the back of the house. It is covered by a flat roof and rests on a reinforced concrete foundation. 

Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona (construction commenced in 1938)

The current building includes the winter house, office and school of architecture, all designed by Wright. Acclaimed as one of his masterpieces, this complex expresses Wright’s educational theories and his vision of society, as well as his architectural concepts. The walls are made of rocks and local wood, while he used concrete as a binder. Natural light plays an important role in design. Wright liked natural light and, in this way, the built environment where he found himself with his students, maintained contact with the surrounding nature.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, New York (construction 1956-1959).

Inside the circle, there is the uphill and downhill route. The trapezoidal septa narrow from top to bottom until they approach the minimum resistance section, then giving way to a circular drum that runs along the outer perimeter of the spiral. On the roof, the partitions are extended so as to form the ribs of the dome that dominates the large empty space.

Text by Elisa Scotti

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