Cinematography – Normal People

Cinematography – Normal People

Giordana Bonanno · 2 years ago · Photography

If we think about our past, are we able to scan our lives through a plot? I personally find it a bit difficult, what I remember vividly is always accompanied by a feeling, by an emotional state that, beautiful or bad, has enclosed a set of days or moments. Yet we idealize the design of a life in time bands with childhood, adolescence, “middle” adulthood, “advanced” adulthood, etc.. But do we really need to divide the years in this way or are we just trying to justify the ages through this idea? Normal People, the TV series directed by Lenny Abrahamson, made me think about a few things and realize that maybe there’s nothing normal about people, or maybe it’s all too normal.

Released during the summer of 2020, the series is based on the second novel by Irish author Sally Rooney and tells the story of Marianne and Connell, two young people who attend the same high school. His mother works as a housekeeper in the Sheridan’s big house. Connell is a popular athlete and the bright student everyone looks up to. Marianne is “uncool,” grumpy and rebellious despite an impeccable high school career. From this premise, it’s as if we can already have a clear picture of the two guys’ plans, know their lives and even imagine the end. But while all this might be true, the only thing we’ll need to know is that the plot is a secondary source. The story, theirs, is not driven by the events that sanction the beginning and happy ending of something, but by the emotional peaks of the two characters who learn about themselves in the difficulties and moments of discouragement. 

And if the dialogues help us to understand them better, their gestures will be the culmination in which all thoughts will converge; it will seem to us to have lived those sensations and we will almost want to try them again. 

The physical touch allows Marianne and Connell to show emotional vulnerability that is otherwise given to them with incredible difficulty. Ita O’Brien, who helped coordinate these scenes, is the author of a set of guidelines on how to ethically stage erotic scenes; she was the one who helped film another sex-positive modern series, “Sex Education.” Director Abrahamson and coordinator O’Brian wanted the sex in the show to feel open, normal and natural, and somewhat equal to any dialogue-this approach almost literally quotes the way Rooney herself handles the subject matter in the book. And director of photography Susie Lovell says that the main reference on set in terms of nudity and color solutions was a candid series of photographs by Nan Goldin

Speaking of which, it’s worth noting how the visual solutions rhyme with a detached style of storytelling: blue tones even on hot summer days, delicate macro photography and a tactile approach to the set design, heavy curtains, velvet or velvet pleasant to the touch, woolen sweaters, textured bedding, peeling on the ceiling wet locks adhered to the forehead. Where the show lacks depth, it makes up for it with an enveloping atmosphere. Sometimes it’s hard to believe that the episodes last only half an hour – for a story where formally little happens, the experience is very intense. 

Simple but visually striking scenes reminiscent of the work of photographer Julien Lallouette. Born in 1991, Julien is a French art director and photographer, born in Le Havre, and based in London. In addition to commercial work, Julien does personal projects where she focuses on one person at a time. His delicacy lies in leaving space for the subject, to tell someone’s story through the habits and gestures trapped in the photos. Visiting her site you can find different series of shots, each dedicated to a different person and titled with the name of the protagonist. Friends, acquaintances, but also models are portrayed in domestic and intimate environments where they have the freedom to show themselves as they really are.

The question most remains this: are we all perfect or are we just imperfectly normal people? Sally Rooney says “what if we admit extreme individualism is unsustainable and try to find the meaning of life in a variety of contacts with others?” What we seek is the possibility of being ourselves while remaining close to others.

Did you know: After filming wrapped, Paul Mescal gave his character’s signature chain necklace as a gift to Daisy Edgar-Jones.

Genre: Romance

Director: Lenny Abrahamson

Director of photography: Suzie Lavelle

WritersSally Rooney, Alice Birch, Mark O’Rowe

Stars: Paul Mascal, Daisy Edgar-Jones

Cinematography – Normal People
Photography
Cinematography – Normal People
Cinematography – Normal People
1 · 26
2 · 26
3 · 26
4 · 26
5 · 26
6 · 26
7 · 26
8 · 26
9 · 26
10 · 26
11 · 26
12 · 26
13 · 26
14 · 26
15 · 26
16 · 26
17 · 26
18 · 26
19 · 26
20 · 26
21 · 26
22 · 26
23 · 26
24 · 26
25 · 26
26 · 26
Let’s go back to photographing like we used to

Let’s go back to photographing like we used to

Giulia Guido · 21 hours ago · Photography

Siamo una generazione di nostalgici, ammettiamolo. Nell’arco di vent’anni abbiamo assistito a talmente tanti cambiamenti che gli oggetti che facevano parte della nostra infanzia iniziano a mancarci. Ma non ci mancano solo gli oggetti, ci mancano i sapori, i momenti, i piccoli gesti che riuscivano a racchiudere un mondo di emozioni e ricordi. Uno di questi è sicuramente quello di scattare fotografie con la macchina fotografica. La macchina ben salda tra le due mani e l’indice della mano destra impegnato a premere il tasto per fotografare sono stati sostituiti dal pollice pronto a sfiorare lo schermo di uno smartphone. In pochi anni, un battito di ciglia, il mondo ha preso una forma strana, quella dei 9:16 degli schermi più piccoli. Ma quanto ci manca quel click a ogni scatto? E lo zoom girando la rotellina in alto a destra? Quanto ci mancano le foto in orizzontale?
A intercettare questo sentimento nostalgico sono stati Xiaomi e Leica che ancora una volta hanno unito le forze per realizzare un prodotto che forse, per la prima volta nella storia della telefonia, invece di essere uno smartphone con un buon apparato fotografico, è una macchina fotografica con smartphone integrato. Lo Xiaomi 14 Ultra unito al Photography Kit è l’oggetto giusto per farci ritrovare i gesti che abbiamo quasi dimenticato, senza però rinunciare alla qualità di oggi. 

“See The World In A New Light”, un progetto di Xiaomi e Leica

I più scettici diranno che uno smartphone non potrà mai sostituire una macchina fotografica. Proprio per questo motivo Xiaomi e Leica hanno coinvolto non uno, ma ben sette fotografi di sette paesi diversi lanciando loro una sfida: raccontare un tema esclusivamente attraverso le lenti dello Xiaomi 14 Ultra. Dalla street photography al ritratto, fino alla fotografia documentaria, i progetti nati da questa collaborazione sono caratterizzati da una qualità invidiabile da molti e sono stati presentati a Madrid lo scorso 11 aprile dagli stessi fotografi che hanno raccontato la loro esperienza e di come lo Xiaomi 14 Ultra sia riuscito ad andare incontro a tutte le loro esigenze, che si scattasse di giorno o di notte, a colori o in bianco e nero, fermi o in movimento. 

Maurice Pehle – Craftmenship (Germania)

Javier Corso – Taste (Spagna)

Rui Caria – Tradition (Portogallo) 

Fabien Ecochard – Vitality (Francia)

Emanuele Di Mare – Moments (Italia)

Vasilis Makris – Authenticity (Grecia)

Anto Magzan – Heritage (Croazia)

Si può mangiare con gli occhi?

Da Madrid, il nostro viaggio è continuato a Valencia dove è stato presentato un altro progetto ideato da Xiaomi con la collaborazione di Leica che ha visto coinvolti due protagonisti speciali: il fotografo spagnolo Javier Corso e Begoña Rodrigo, chef del ristorante La Salita, una stella Michelin. Corso e Rodrigo hanno lavorato fianco a fianco per raccontare la cucina in modo nuovo e rivoluzionario: ogni piatto del menù della chef è stato abbinato a una maestranza artigianale, e quindi a un materiale, che ritroviamo sia nell’impiattamento sia nei sapori. Se fino ad oggi pensavamo che fosse impossibile fotografare un sapore, dopo aver scoperto il progetto “Eating with your eyes” e aver provato di persona a scattare i piatti del menù de La Salita ne siamo un molto meno certi. 

Xiaomi
raw

Torniamo a fotografare come una volta

Una volta collegata l’impugnatura per macchina fotografica allo smartphone (che fa anche da powerbank e si è rivelato molto utile stando fuori dalla mattina fino a sera), tornare a fotografare come una volta è stato un po’ come andare in bicicletta: è bastato solo uno scatto per ricordare tutto ciò che pensavamo di aver dimenticato.
Forse, se le nostre vecchie macchinette avessero avuto la qualità della modalità pro dello Xiaomi 14 Ultra non le avremmo mai abbandonate. Ora grazie a Xiaomi e Leica possiamo riassaporare il passato e il vero gusto della fotografia, ma guardando al futuro.

Tutte le fotografie sono state scattate con Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Let’s go back to photographing like we used to
Photography
Let’s go back to photographing like we used to
Let’s go back to photographing like we used to
1 · 25
2 · 25
3 · 25
4 · 25
5 · 25
6 · 25
7 · 25
8 · 25
9 · 25
10 · 25
11 · 25
12 · 25
13 · 25
14 · 25
15 · 25
16 · 25
17 · 25
18 · 25
19 · 25
20 · 25
21 · 25
22 · 25
23 · 25
24 · 25
25 · 25
Not your usual Granny

Not your usual Granny

Giorgia Massari · 14 hours ago · Photography

“But what will you do with all the photos you take of me, one is enough for the cemetery, you know!” comments the grandmother of photographer Alessia Spina, who has made her the undisputed protagonist of her latest project. Nonnetta is the title of the photographic project that marks the transgenerational bond. An exploration of intimacy led by a granddaughter armed with an analog camera, rooted in her family and traditions. In Alessia Spina’s photographs, Nonna Elvira embodies the essence of all grandmothers, and through these images, we witness a tapestry of glances, laughter, gestures, tastes, acts of care, and daily rituals, each imbued with an emotional depth that challenges capture. Spina’s project will be on display in Milan from October 1st to 13th as part of the PhotoFestival at Via Laghetto 2.

Nonna Elvira represents not only herself but all grandmothers. She seizes life with both hands, savoring its joys and laughter. She is a safe harbor, much like her beloved San Benedetto del Tronto, her hometown. She is a drawer filled with goodness, to be opened when needed, when it’s cold outside and the world inside aches. She is a repository of memories, brimming with the unique flavors of her cannelloni and a fragrance that fills the mind and heart, soothing even the deepest wounds, much like Proust’s madeleine.

In the frames captured by Alessia Spina, we witness the eternal beauty of the transgenerational bond, a tapestry woven from the threads of love, memories, and the essence of family. Nonnetta is not just a photographic project; it is a testament to the power of love and the timeless connections that bind generations together.

Ph Credits Alessia Spina

Not your usual Granny
Photography
Not your usual Granny
Not your usual Granny
1 · 9
2 · 9
3 · 9
4 · 9
5 · 9
6 · 9
7 · 9
8 · 9
9 · 9
Giulia Frump wants us to reconect with nature

Giulia Frump wants us to reconect with nature

Collater.al Contributors · 4 days ago · Photography

We’ve already talked about Giulia Frump here, but we couldn’t miss mentioning MAPS, the project by the photographer dating back to 2019, now on display at MIA Photo Fair until April 14th. The intention of this visual narrative is to reconstruct this seemingly invisible bond with the natural world through photographs, juxtaposing elements as diverse as they are similar. This reflection stems from the world we live in, characterized by increasingly frequent and facilitated connections where physical contact is diminishing day by day. A consideration shared by many, especially post-COVID-19, but one that continues to fascinate us.

Giulia Frump’s project also speaks of acceptance towards the changing body, aging, and the need to know when to stop. The subjects are all female: women who «have chosen to fearlessly show what can be socially perceived as flaws (skin blemishes, wrinkles, gray hair, scars, veins, and more), offering a genuine image of the numerous changes that occur throughout life, embracing them and letting photography assist them in a process of acceptance,» as the photographer tells us.

In short, this new reality brings us closer to distant worlds, but simultaneously sets aside our belonging to the natural world, now relegated to a few moments of our daily lives. However, this alienation has sparked MAPS, which as early as 2019 was reflecting on these issues.

Giulia Frump wants us to reconect with nature
Photography
Giulia Frump wants us to reconect with nature
Giulia Frump wants us to reconect with nature
1 · 9
2 · 9
3 · 9
4 · 9
5 · 9
6 · 9
7 · 9
8 · 9
9 · 9
MIA Photo Fair, What We Liked Most

MIA Photo Fair, What We Liked Most

Giorgia Massari · 5 days ago · Photography

The preview of the eighth edition of MIA Photo Fair, the photography fair that returns to Milan every year with a selection of international artists, was held yesterday, April 10. This year it is no longer in the usual Superstudio Maxi, but moves next to the star of the week, Miart. So that, potentially, in one day the bravest can see two fairs by getting off at the Portello metro stop. Miart at gate 5 of Allianz MiCo while MIA Photo at gate 16. Getting to the point, let’s talk about what we liked. As is always the case, following the trade fair system, many of the exhibits are seen and seen again, but still enjoyable to review such as shots by established photographers of the caliber of Giovanni Gastel and Ugo Mulas, or even photojournalists Fausto Giaccone and Carlo Orsi. But, among the many evergreens we have unearthed a few new ones, perhaps a few names we have already heard, but not so much in our opinion. Therefore, we made a selection of our favorite booths.

#1 Maria Svarbova – ARTITLEDcontemporary (B022)

mia photo fair

#2 Irina Werning – OTM Gallery (B023)

mia photo fair

#3 Karla Hiraldo Voleau – Christophe Guye Galerie (B019)

mia photo fair

#4 Laetitia Ky – LIS10 Gallery (E014)

mia photo fair

#5 Giulia Frump – Young Art Hunters (F018)

#6 Paolo Ventura – MarcoRossi ArteContemporanea (A022)

mia photo fair

#7 Daniele Ratti – VisionQuest 4Rosso (C018)

mia photo fair

#8 Najla Said – Mashrabia Gallery (F005)

mia photo fair

#9 Angelo Formato – Welcome to my known collective exhibition

mia photo fair

#10 Thorsten Brinkmann – Galleria Fumagalli (A019)

mia photo fair

MIA Photo Fair will remain open until Sunday, April 14.

MIA Photo Fair, What We Liked Most
Photography
MIA Photo Fair, What We Liked Most
MIA Photo Fair, What We Liked Most
1 · 11
2 · 11
3 · 11
4 · 11
5 · 11
6 · 11
7 · 11
8 · 11
9 · 11
10 · 11
11 · 11
Other articles we recommend