Calm, Don’t Look Up is just a comedy

Calm, Don’t Look Up is just a comedy

Tommaso Berra · 5 months ago · Art

When Mom, with slipper in hand, invited us to come to her promising that she wouldn’t do anything it was safe to assume that it wouldn’t. When Don’t look Up, a new film distributed by Netflix, directed and scripted by Adam McKay, tells us from the very first scenes that it will be a light product and not a cinematic miracle, we can trust that it will be so. Instead, no, we can’t even appreciate cinepanettoni anymore, even when they’re made for $75 million.
The blanket critique by the critics’ desk, with snail to precede the name, is not justified, or only partially so. Okay, the caricatures of easily recognizable characters (Trump, Musk/Jobs) are obvious, but this is a comedy. In popular comedies, the man who comes home to find his wife in bed with his lover doesn’t show great psychological depth, but more insanity, made ridiculous because it’s exaggerated, and so do the characters in the film.
Don’t Look Up is a comedy, the all-star game cast was not a policy that would have guaranteed us repayment for the two and a half hours of life lost on the couch in front of the MacBook.
Although the themes put forth by McKay may make you think so (environmental crisis, power of institutions, trust in technology and science), the film is not a committed film, the kind with languid actors, in which astrophysicists like Randall Mindy ( Leonardo DiCaprio) and Kate Dibiasky (Jennifer Lawrence) would have been well made up, and not in the more likely plaid shirt that appears in the film. Don’t Look Up doesn’t aspire to eternal glory because it doesn’t put any of the actors in their own comfort zone, balancing scenes in which Meryl Streep (Madame President), Cate Blanchett, Mark Rylance, Timothée Chalamet, Ariana Grande and Jonah Hill appear. 

The dialogues of Don’t Look Up are comic lines in the style of Saturday Night Live (for which, not by chance, Adam McKay was the author for six years at the beginning of his career), in which we see many of the absurd drifts towards which the media and the population have been pushing in recent years, in the USA and with more awkward results in Italy. Presidents and mayors with fan pages of “little girls” popping up everywhere, spokespersons who are good because they know how to wear a Birkin by Hermès (and save her from the apocalypse, thank goodness), sexy scientists (to be read under the heading “virologists”) who just need a “guest appearance” to find the right inclination of their gaze in favor of the camera.
Indirectly, Don’t Look Up also talks a lot about Italy, and the inability to listen to scientific opinions, (as clarified by DiCaprio himself during an interview), a current issue, of which we only understood that it was not making us laugh, confirming that we looked at the finger and not the moon.
The film, which I won’t watch twice anyway, therefore seemed deliberately messy to me, replicating that media and public debate confusion of wanting to talk about everything at the same time. In the first scene at the white house, a catastrophic comet, outrage over the cost of snacks, beauty, scientific authority, politics, and the prestige of universities are all talked about in a single dialogue, all postponing the decision with respect to the only real reason the protagonists were in that room.
The White House, or the studio of the talk show hosted by Cate Blanchett, are metaphors for the living rooms in which experts of dubious experience are given the floor; it almost seems as if we have turned off Netflix and turned on an Italian opinion TV show.
The characters are cut to big chunks, the plot lacks salt and balance, it is a parody of a world that is already self-parodying. Wasn’t it clear enough that the sign outside read, “trattoria with working-class menu” and not “two-Michelin-starred bistro”? Luckily we have a plan to deflect the comet, which we will affectionately call Omicron, meanwhile we don’t look up, we could take our eyes off the finger and see the moon. 

Don't Look Up | Collater.al
Calm, Don’t Look Up is just a comedy
Art
Calm, Don’t Look Up is just a comedy
Calm, Don’t Look Up is just a comedy
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The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

San Francisco is one of the most fascinating cities in the United States; over the course of two centuries it has experienced the entire evolution of American civilization firsthand, fostering the birth of artistic and cultural currents that have marked the ages.
The history of San Francisco and the Bay Area more generally is now told in a beautiful volume published by Taschen and entitled “San Francisco. Portrait of a City.” Through 500 photographs it traces the early years of industrial development and the stories of the free spirits of the 1970s through the lights and fervor of the Roaring Twenties.

The volume contains images from archives and private collections, taken by some of the most celebrated photographers, who over the course of their careers have been inspired by the California city. Inside are portraits of the many innovators who have contributed to the development of the city, a place that represents “a crystal ball in which to see a preview of what will come to us in a few years,” as Michele Masneri had described it in The Passenger magazine’s recent volume devoted to the city.
The 480-page collected shots also show a city skyline far from the one we know today, dominated by the Golden Gate Bridge of which construction work from the 1930s is visible. In addition to the Bay Area’s unique climate, “San Francisco. Portrait of a City” also shows areas the multicultural soul of the city, with images of the huge Chinatown district or Fillmore, the one historically home to Jews and Japanese.
You can purchase the book on the official Taschen website.

San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
Photography
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
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Japan as seen in infrared

Japan as seen in infrared

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Hashira Yamamoto is a photographer, but he also describes himself as a traveler and researcher. Over the course of his career as an artist, he has visited 41 countries and 161 cities around the world, in which he has shot some of his photo series, to tell stories i cultures and of all the incredible people he has encountered. Over the years he has had a close look at his home nation of Japan, cultivating a passion for traditional landscapes along the Silk Road.
Yamamoto in his Asuka series has reinterpreted the tradition of historic Japanese buildings through an infrared lens, creating a dialogue between ancient and contemporary Japan to an effect that immerses traditional temples and gardens in a glitchy, vaporwave world.

The saturated colors of the photos alter the perception of a solid tradition that in some respects has remained intact over the centuries. Cultural references are not altered, architectures are not emptied of meaning, but rather taken in a new contemporary guise. Hashira Yamamoto had precisely the goal with this infrared lens to enhance even more the quiet and contemplative magic that testifies to the inherent spirituality of the places photographed. 

Japan as seen in infrared
Photography
Japan as seen in infrared
Japan as seen in infrared
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week, we have selected your 10 best proposals: @polae.jpg, @laurasole_79, @claudiabellati, @carolinalecce, @eli_rmn, @_eleonoram_, @teresa_scafa, @noemily_ph, @matti_b9, @ele.naus.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @zenzeroelimone_, @feebelli, @simeingolo, @davidecannavo, @_barbarac__, @valerycia, @sararotola, @saracamporesi.it, @il_salvo_, @_eleonoram_.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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