Kinahan’s Whiskey launches KASC, a creative project for the community

Kinahan’s Whiskey launches KASC, a creative project for the community

Giulia Pacciardi · 5 days ago · Art

KASC is the new creative space created by Kinahan’s Whiskey to promote the values of cohesion and inclusiveness, the leitmotif of our era, and the mirror of our needs, where Whiskey meets art with the aim of inspiring evolution of collective thought and thus fostering social progress.

The mission of this new charity project is to create an innovative dimension where the art object is also invested with a social responsibility that allows it to be a driving force for change.

KASC is much more than a collector’s item, it is an intersection and overlapping of different cultural influences that create a new intermediate identity capable of revealing a hitherto hidden value. It is a contemporary totem, a tangible emotion that wants to provoke confrontation and inspire changesays Zak Oganian, Managing Director of Kinahan’s Whiskey. 

For the first release KASC has collaborated with the contemporary artist MARCANTONIO that counts among its collaborations realities such as Seletti, Giorgio Armani and the Rossana Orlandi art gallery.
For this occasion the Italian artist has created a work entitled “I’M OK”, whose characteristic is a portrait of the artist himself set inside a bottle of Kinahan’s Whiskey. 

The profits from the work, which will be produced in a limited edition of only 500 pieces, will be donated to Food for Soul, the non-profit association of Massimo Bottura and Lara Gilmore, which encourages a healthy and fair food system.

The online pre-order of the artwork is already available and you can find it here.

Kinahan’s Whiskey launches KASC, a creative project for the community
Art
Kinahan’s Whiskey launches KASC, a creative project for the community
Kinahan’s Whiskey launches KASC, a creative project for the community
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A wall of stained glass between Parisian boulevards

A wall of stained glass between Parisian boulevards

Giulia Guido · 4 days ago · Art, Design

Imagine walking through the Parisian streets of the Rive Gauche when you take Boulevard Raspail and instead of walking past the walls of the buildings you find yourself looking at the reflection of the streets on a very long wall of stained glass. This is the latest work by architect Aldric Beckmann for the Embellir Paris initiative. 

Embellir Paris is a project aimed at all artists, collectives, students, designers, architects and art schools in Paris that aims to give new life to specific points of the city through the creation of installations and works. After a first selection in 2018, the 20 selected artists have started to design and realize their works. 

Aldric Beckmann’s work, entitled Tangram sur Raspail, was officially inaugurated at the beginning of the year, but only now (after the lockdown and with the arrival of the summer season) does it show its full potential. The work consists of a wall, also known as a landscape fresco, made by assembling enamelled glass panels, each of a different colour. 

The production of the panels was commissioned to the French company Sto, specialized in glass processing, while the choice of colors was the result of a careful study of the surrounding landscape. Every shade present in Aldric Beckmann’s work is in fact present in the street and in the neighborhood, in this way the installation becomes a real reinterpretation of the environment. 

In addition to bringing a touch of color to the Boulevard Raspail, Tangram sur Raspail reflects everything around it, from buildings to cars on the street, offering citizens and tourists a new vision of Paris. 

Go to the Embellir Paris website to discover all the other projects and Aldric Beckmann’s website to learn about the architect’s past work. 

A wall of stained glass between Parisian boulevards
Art
A wall of stained glass between Parisian boulevards
A wall of stained glass between Parisian boulevards
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Andy Leek will install his work in King’s Cross for three months

Andy Leek will install his work in King’s Cross for three months

Emanuele D'Angelo · 4 days ago · Art

The famous street artist Andy Leek to celebrate the reopening of shops and activities in England for the coming summer months will bring his art to King’s Cross, an area located between the village of Camden and Islington, in the city of London.

The artist has been given carte blanche to colour and revive King’s Cross at will for three months, like a canvas. He will create an evolving series of public artworks that will spread optimism, with the intention of giving the nation some positivity when it comes out of lockdown for good.

Andy Leek’s first on-site installation, entitled This Much, is inspired by the social distancing guidelines that we have all followed in recent months. Spranging up all over the estate, This Much takes the form of 28 outstretched arms with messages of hope and love between them.

“For all these months it’s been two metres of fear, loneliness and danger. I’m going to flip that into two metres of hope, positivity and humour. We all stayed apart to look after each other, to keep not only our loved ones safe but strangers we’ve never met. It’s so easy to take things for granted until we lose them, so it’s nice to hold on to that feeling of how much we missed loved ones as things being to return to some normality.”

Andy Leek will install his work in King’s Cross for three months
Art
Andy Leek will install his work in King’s Cross for three months
Andy Leek will install his work in King’s Cross for three months
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The surreal architecture by Doug John Miller

The surreal architecture by Doug John Miller

Giulia Guido · 3 days ago · Art

Doug John Miller’s drawings are not illustrations to be browsed quickly and carelessly, they are illustrations in which you have to get lost, to get close to the eyes in order to capture even the smallest detail. 

Doug John Miller is a London architect, graduated in 2015 from the Bartlett School of Architecture, who dedicates his spare time to his second passion, illustration, without ever forgetting his work. 

Using design programs and integrating them with Photoshop and Illustrator, Doug brings to life worlds where architecture is the real protagonist. Futuristic buildings with impossible shapes, closed gardens developed on levels that intertwine endlessly, houses built on top of each other. Everything that the English architect illustrates would be impossible to build in the real world, but the more we spend time following flights of stairs, capturing every element of furniture, discovering where a street leads, the more we think the world around us should be like the one designed by Doug John Miller. 

Each table is composed of so many details that it seems to be able to tell us a whole story, becoming illustrated narratives. 

We have selected only a few of Doug’s works, but to discover them all visit his website and follow him on Instagram

The surreal architecture by Doug John Miller
Art
The surreal architecture by Doug John Miller
The surreal architecture by Doug John Miller
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Amaury Dubois’ fresco in a Church of Châtelaillon-Plage

Amaury Dubois’ fresco in a Church of Châtelaillon-Plage

Giulia Pacciardi · 3 days ago · Art

Created inside the Church of Sainte-Madeleine in Châtelaillon-Plage, a French town overlooking the sea, artist Amaury Dubois‘ latest work has earned the title of one of the largest frescoes ever painted inside a French church.

The work, set in a context of restoration of the entire building, was created ad hoc to respect the spiritual dimension of the Church, but also to reflect the maritime and solar soul of the particular location.

Dubois’ subjects, in fact, are symbols that can be linked to both realities, the bewitching waves of the sea that characterize the ceiling are full of fish bones, reminiscent of the ocean, but also one of the symbols of Christianity.

The colours used by the artist to represent nature are warm and the light that penetrates the stained glass windows seems to bring to life all the elements he made with precision and great attention to detail.

Dubois completed the work in just two months, despite the fact that he decided to do this alone, completely by hand and with only 5 brushes, succeeding in managing to achieve the goal of creating a mural that seems to take life at every step.

Amaury Dubois’ fresco in a Church of Châtelaillon-Plage
Art
Amaury Dubois’ fresco in a Church of Châtelaillon-Plage
Amaury Dubois’ fresco in a Church of Châtelaillon-Plage
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