Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore

Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore

Andrea Tuzio · 4 months ago · Style

In early July, precisely on the 5th, Seinfeld turned 33 years old.
If you don’t know what Seinfeld is or more simply have never seen it, here, I suggest you remedy that beforehand.
Seinfeld is an American sitcom that aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 until May 14, 1998, for a total of no less than 9 seasons.

This epoch-making series was created by Jerry Seinfeld, a legend of U.S. stand-up comedy, and another unique and inimitable character of American show biz, Larry David.

The “show about nothing” – as it is still called today – set mostly on New York’s Upper West Side stars, in addition to Jerry Seinfeld himself, who plays an imaginative and sui generis version of himself, Jason Alexander (George Costanza), Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Elaine Benes) and Micheal Richards (Cosmo Kramer), all of whom have become cult characters.

A postmodern series, where the protagonists were “singles in their 30-somethings … rootless, with vague identities, and with a conscious indifference to morality”, during which a new model of representing reality was coming into being.
Ingrained narrative conventions such as clearly separating characters and the actors playing them, the world of the characters from that of the actors and the audience, were being overturned. An example of this is the story line in which characters try to promote a television sitcom called Jerry. The show within the show, Jerry, in which Seinfeld played himself, and which was avowedly “about nothing”, was resoundingly similar to Seinfeld. Jerry was launched in the final episode of the fourth season, but it was unsuccessful and was dropped, thus creating a metareferential understanding and language with the audience.
From a stylistic point of view, Seinfeld has influenced the formats, language, and style of so many iconic series such as The Office, Arrested Development, Scrubs, and many others.

What interests us more closely, however, is to go and explore a specific peculiarity of the show, styling, which over the years has acquired an importance and significance that deserves to be explored.
The show’s legacy, which has now become an absolute cult, has ensured that the attention around the events of Jerry Seinfeld and company has always been very high, social media then did the rest thanks to memes, videos, references, etc..

The show’s costumes retained a timeless appeal, and in charge of styling the series, along with costume designer Stephanie Kennedy, was Jerry himself, who wanted for his character that there be no difference between what he wore on set during filming and what he used to put on in everyday life.

The choice of genericness of costumes was also declined on the other characters of the sitcom: George Costanza is the character who more than the others had to appear simple, essential. In fact, we see him wearing Levi’s, Dockers, sweaters, New York Yankees jackets and jerseys, questionable hats, chenille jumpsuits, and so much else that determines his sobriety, with some peaks that I will not spoil in case you have not seen the series.
What really no one could have predicted, however, is that the style of Constance in Seinfeld, could end up in the moodboards of the coolest brands of our contemporary times.

It makes one smile, and at the same time reflect, to see the character’s looks associated with the lookbooks of the brand that, more than any other in this moment in history, defines the aesthetic of coolness linked to a soft, hinted, simple, and refined elegance at the same time, Aimé Leon Dore.

If you also factor in nostalgia and thus the consequent return of 90s fashion, that’s it.
Costanza is a New Yorker doc, just as Aimé Leon Dore wishes to embody the spirit of the Big Apple through his collections, recalling distinctive elements of it and involving characters who live, work and represent its style in New York in all respects, not just aesthetically.
The character of Elaine Benes became an icon of the concept of “unfashionable,” floral dresses, objectionable blazers and almost comical shirts. The choice, however, was thoughtful: these were used clothes that were then altered to elicit hilarity from the audience, succeeding perfectly.
To the InsideHook platform Kennedy revealed, “It’s a fine line. You don’t want the clothes to attract too much attention. If you look at the clothes, then I’m not doing my job”.

Another key aspect of the issue is Jerry’s passion for Nike and for shoes in general. He insisted very much that George Costanza’s character often wore a pair of Cortez, which were to become a defining characteristic of the character, as well as for Kramer, who always wore a pair of Dr. Martens on his feet.
As for Jerry, a true and passionate sneakerhead, there was nothing but Nike. Over the course of the nine seasons, we saw it all. Then when Nike understood the scale of the phenomenon and more importantly realized that it could be a great marketing operation to tie in with the show in some way, they decided to endorse the cast and crew characters, going so far as to make collaborations and merchandise specifically for the series.

If you feel like catching up or rewatching it (it’s always a good time for a Seinfeld rewatch) you can find all 9 seasons on Netflix, give yourself a treat and watch it.


Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore
Style
Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore
Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore
1 · 11
2 · 11
3 · 11
4 · 11
5 · 11
6 · 11
7 · 11
8 · 11
9 · 11
10 · 11
11 · 11
Search for truth and fiction – interview with Enrico Costantini

Search for truth and fiction – interview with Enrico Costantini

Tommaso Berra · 2 days ago · Photography

We intercept Enrico Costantini in one of the few breaks between trips, when the photographer, a “nomad” as he calls himself, recharges his batteries before returning to observe the world from his point of view, which like photography is truth and fiction. Travel and photography for Enrico Costantini are tools through which we can be part of something that does not belong to us but that we can make our own for an instant.
Curious to understand how his relationship with the camera comes about and to discover some secrets with respect to his many travels over the years, Collater.al had a chat with Enrico.

How did you get into photography?
Actually it was accidental! I went to an art school in Venice and then continued my studies in Rome where I majored in interior design. I got into the world of fashion and then from there into photography. I bought my first SLR camera when I was 20 years old and started experimenting. I have always had a strong connection with the value of “memory,” and from there perhaps comes my collecting nature. Sometimes one takes photographs out of fear of forgetting or fear of being forgotten. Now I experience photography as a chance to tell without having to use too many words, sometimes through a photo one can steal a moment of someone else’s life and make it one’s own, leaving instead something of our own, of one’s own experience.

With your photographs you take us to faraway places like Socotra, Cuba, Oman, the Philippines and many others. What stories are you looking for? What stories do you want to tell?
Before embarking on a new journey, you never really know what’s coming. I like to reach remote and unspoiled destinations. Perhaps what I really go in search of is authenticity. Similarly, I love architecture and design, so any destination that includes at least one of these components becomes a source of stimulation and research for me.

It goes without saying that while traveling you have very different equipment at your disposal from what that a studio photographer has. What, in your opinion, is the equipment needed for this type of photography?
Personally, as a photographer, I use only natural light. I love natural light and capturing its many and varied nuances. Each moment is never similar to its previous one. That said, I usually travel rather lightly if you can call it that. However, I like to carry several cameras with me. I would say that in this case there is no real need but certainly do not underestimate to equip yourself with multiple batteries and sufficient memory, admittedly in certain travel conditions it helps a lot to save precious time.

Is there a shot you are particularly fond of? Tell us about it.
I don’t think there is one particular shot that I am fond of. Probably in general to all the
shots related to my first reportage trip to Asia. A trip that lasted 4 months from New Delhi to Hong Kong passing 7 states, over 10,000 km on the road. It was my first overseas trip, I was 23 years old, and it was my first real experience where I found myself reporting on the people the places the situations I encountered on my way. It gave me a lot. These are shots that although very simple and of not so good technical achievement, every time I see them again, they arouse something very deep in me.

Search for truth and fiction – interview with Enrico Costantini
Photography
Search for truth and fiction – interview with Enrico Costantini
Search for truth and fiction – interview with Enrico Costantini
1 · 14
2 · 14
3 · 14
4 · 14
5 · 14
6 · 14
7 · 14
8 · 14
9 · 14
10 · 14
11 · 14
12 · 14
13 · 14
14 · 14
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross

“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross

Tommaso Berra · 3 days ago · Photography

The female nude body in the photographic shots of Alina Gross becomes an element far from any erotic representation, or rather the language of photography facilitate the attempt to evoke the ambivalences of sexuality and gender.
The Ukrainian photographer and now based in Germany brings to mind erotic elements through the associations of natural shapes and elements, combining them to create an imperfect beauty, the “Beauty of Imperfection” that is also the title of her latest artbook as well as the project the artist has been pursuing for the past four years.
Alina Gross does not show a univocal beauty – and figure of women – to be told only through traditional canons of beauty, but expands the meaning of forms, thanks also to a pictorial rendering of bodies, aided by the use of color that often sprinkles the skin. The disturbing effect of viewing naked parts is not masked, Gross however invites the viewer to review the mental process of analyzing reality and its definition, which leads to breaking down dizzying barriers.

Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross
Photography
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross
1 · 13
2 · 13
3 · 13
4 · 13
5 · 13
6 · 13
7 · 13
8 · 13
9 · 13
10 · 13
11 · 13
12 · 13
13 · 13
“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 

“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 

Giulia Guido · 6 days ago · Photography

Don’t Worry Darling is one of those cases where one watches the film more out of curiosity than healthy interest. The film, which arrived in theaters last Sept. 22 and was presented at the Venice Film Festival last Sept. 5, began to be talked about long before the trailer, teaser and first photos from the set. 

In fact, the controversies began right at the beginning of filming, when Olivia Wilde, who signs off as director, fired Shia LaBeouf, justifying this decision to the actor’s method of working, which according to Wilde did not fit her modus operandi.
Olivia Wilde’s problems also continued with the leading lady, Florence Pugh, with whom she seems to have had several tensions (never publicly confirmed).
Rounding out this complicated production phase came the director’s choice to replace LaBeouf with then-partner Harry Styles

Inevitably, all these events also took their toll on the promotion phase, which, however, shifted the focus from the actual film to pure gossip. 

A shame? Perhaps not. 

Alice and Jack Chambers are a happily married couple living in Victory, an experimental 1950s community where the men spend all day at work, while the women take care of the house, and then spend their free time with their neighbors. Something suddenly changes, however, and Alice begins to feel constrained in that life, with an increasing desire to discover what lies beyond the city limits. This is the plot, which in itself also hides something potentially interesting, unfortunately it is the development that is lacking. It’s like when teachers in school used to say “he has potential but he doesn’t apply himself.” 

Of all that Don’t Worry Darling puts on the table-which seems more like a need for redemption on Wilde’s part-something is saved and it is the reason why the film lets you watch it to the end: the aesthetics

In fact, the director used the work of Matthew Libatique, an American cinematographer and regular collaborator of Darren Aronofsky, to take care of the photography. In nearly three decades of work, Libatique has handled the cinematography for such films as Requiem for a Dream and The Black Swan, experience that led him to be prepared for the eerie reality brought to the big screen in Don’t Worry Darling. It is immediately noticeable how the warm light that illuminates the entire town becomes cold and gloomy when Alice is alone with herself, and becomes colder and colder as time passes. The use of light, then, goes hand in hand with the colors of the places: for example, the bathroom tiles are green, reminiscent of hospital uniforms. 

For this reason, it was particularly difficult to select only 10 frames from the film, which perhaps focused heavily on aesthetics and too little on content. 

“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 
Photography
“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 
“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 
1 · 11
2 · 11
3 · 11
4 · 11
5 · 11
6 · 11
7 · 11
8 · 11
9 · 11
10 · 11
11 · 11
Salt pans as mosaics in Tom Hegen’s shots

Salt pans as mosaics in Tom Hegen’s shots

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

Beginning in 2018, German photographer Tom Hegen traveled between Australia, Senegal, France, and Spain, observing from above the landscape and morphology of these territories, particularly the salt marshes, fascinating places that appear like precious mosaics from the sky.
The geometries and network of paths makes these landscapes almost abstract when observed from above, and the painterly hues that push the colors toward yellow, blue and the typical pink look like palettes of some watercolorist with a delicate style.
The series of photographs tells a very peculiar element of the landscape, in which nature, in all its barrenness, manages to show energy and creativity, which Hegen succeeds in highlighting by giving us an unusual and unique point of view.

Tom Hegen | Collater.al
Tom Hegen | Collater.al
Tom Hegen | Collater.al
Tom Hegen | Collater.al
Tom Hegen | Collater.al
Tom Hegen | Collater.al
Salt pans as mosaics in Tom Hegen’s shots
Photography
Salt pans as mosaics in Tom Hegen’s shots
Salt pans as mosaics in Tom Hegen’s shots
1 · 7
2 · 7
3 · 7
4 · 7
5 · 7
6 · 7
7 · 7