Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore

Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore

Andrea Tuzio · 2 weeks ago · Style

In early July, precisely on the 5th, Seinfeld turned 33 years old.
If you don’t know what Seinfeld is or more simply have never seen it, here, I suggest you remedy that beforehand.
Seinfeld is an American sitcom that aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 until May 14, 1998, for a total of no less than 9 seasons.

This epoch-making series was created by Jerry Seinfeld, a legend of U.S. stand-up comedy, and another unique and inimitable character of American show biz, Larry David.

The “show about nothing” – as it is still called today – set mostly on New York’s Upper West Side stars, in addition to Jerry Seinfeld himself, who plays an imaginative and sui generis version of himself, Jason Alexander (George Costanza), Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Elaine Benes) and Micheal Richards (Cosmo Kramer), all of whom have become cult characters.

A postmodern series, where the protagonists were “singles in their 30-somethings … rootless, with vague identities, and with a conscious indifference to morality”, during which a new model of representing reality was coming into being.
Ingrained narrative conventions such as clearly separating characters and the actors playing them, the world of the characters from that of the actors and the audience, were being overturned. An example of this is the story line in which characters try to promote a television sitcom called Jerry. The show within the show, Jerry, in which Seinfeld played himself, and which was avowedly “about nothing”, was resoundingly similar to Seinfeld. Jerry was launched in the final episode of the fourth season, but it was unsuccessful and was dropped, thus creating a metareferential understanding and language with the audience.
From a stylistic point of view, Seinfeld has influenced the formats, language, and style of so many iconic series such as The Office, Arrested Development, Scrubs, and many others.

What interests us more closely, however, is to go and explore a specific peculiarity of the show, styling, which over the years has acquired an importance and significance that deserves to be explored.
The show’s legacy, which has now become an absolute cult, has ensured that the attention around the events of Jerry Seinfeld and company has always been very high, social media then did the rest thanks to memes, videos, references, etc..

The show’s costumes retained a timeless appeal, and in charge of styling the series, along with costume designer Stephanie Kennedy, was Jerry himself, who wanted for his character that there be no difference between what he wore on set during filming and what he used to put on in everyday life.

The choice of genericness of costumes was also declined on the other characters of the sitcom: George Costanza is the character who more than the others had to appear simple, essential. In fact, we see him wearing Levi’s, Dockers, sweaters, New York Yankees jackets and jerseys, questionable hats, chenille jumpsuits, and so much else that determines his sobriety, with some peaks that I will not spoil in case you have not seen the series.
What really no one could have predicted, however, is that the style of Constance in Seinfeld, could end up in the moodboards of the coolest brands of our contemporary times.

It makes one smile, and at the same time reflect, to see the character’s looks associated with the lookbooks of the brand that, more than any other in this moment in history, defines the aesthetic of coolness linked to a soft, hinted, simple, and refined elegance at the same time, Aimé Leon Dore.

If you also factor in nostalgia and thus the consequent return of 90s fashion, that’s it.
Costanza is a New Yorker doc, just as Aimé Leon Dore wishes to embody the spirit of the Big Apple through his collections, recalling distinctive elements of it and involving characters who live, work and represent its style in New York in all respects, not just aesthetically.
The character of Elaine Benes became an icon of the concept of “unfashionable,” floral dresses, objectionable blazers and almost comical shirts. The choice, however, was thoughtful: these were used clothes that were then altered to elicit hilarity from the audience, succeeding perfectly.
To the InsideHook platform Kennedy revealed, “It’s a fine line. You don’t want the clothes to attract too much attention. If you look at the clothes, then I’m not doing my job”.

Another key aspect of the issue is Jerry’s passion for Nike and for shoes in general. He insisted very much that George Costanza’s character often wore a pair of Cortez, which were to become a defining characteristic of the character, as well as for Kramer, who always wore a pair of Dr. Martens on his feet.
As for Jerry, a true and passionate sneakerhead, there was nothing but Nike. Over the course of the nine seasons, we saw it all. Then when Nike understood the scale of the phenomenon and more importantly realized that it could be a great marketing operation to tie in with the show in some way, they decided to endorse the cast and crew characters, going so far as to make collaborations and merchandise specifically for the series.

If you feel like catching up or rewatching it (it’s always a good time for a Seinfeld rewatch) you can find all 9 seasons on Netflix, give yourself a treat and watch it.


Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore
Style
Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore
Seinfeld’s 33 years, George Costanza and Aimé Leon Dore
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Tommaso Berra · 5 days ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @effyrose__, @niinque, @saraperacchia, @jus._._._, @nuovi_obiettivi_, @serenabiaginiph, @nellys.ph, @matti_b9, @franscescaersilia1, @kevin.ponzuoli.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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10 photos to discover Fiumefreddo Photo Festival

10 photos to discover Fiumefreddo Photo Festival

Tommaso Berra · 6 days ago · Photography

In the past few days the Fiumefreddo Photo Festival has opened in the picturesque village of Fiumefreddo Bruzio on the lower Tyrrhenian coast of Cosenza. The event dedicated to contemporary photography is in its first edition and hosts Italian and international artists, as well as a section dedicated to emerging photographers.
Until Sept. 10, the event will host shots by artists, along with events, talks and workshops that will explore the theme of the edition, entitled “MIDWAY: between past and future.”
The aim of the projects is to depict the time that belongs to us but also to provoke perplexity and trigger doubts, delving into the theme of environmental and climate protection and the cultural, political and social fallout it triggers.

Fiumefreddo | Collater.al

Among the leading names at the festival are Misha Vallejo Prut, with his account of the indigenous Kichwa community of Sarayaku (in Ecuador), Marco Zorzanello and his images of how the tourism industry is reacting to the effects of climate change, and Gabriele Cecconi, on display with a photographic survey of the microcosm of Kuwait. Others then included Giacomo d’Orlando and his underwater greenhouses, Fabian Albertini and Alex Urso.
The winner of the call dedicated to emerging photographers is Bianca Maldini, who at the festival will present “Once Someone Told Me,” an exhibition project that stems from a personal research on the incredible, the irrational.
Take a look at 10 of the best photographs on display at Fiumefreddo Photo Festival, a terrace on the world that opens in the heart of southern Italy.

Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Alexandre Silberman
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Maria Giulia Trombini
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Gabriele Cecconi
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Giacomo D’Orlando
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Misha Vallejo
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Bianca Maldini
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Marco Zorzanello
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Francesca Corriga
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Alex Urso
Fiumefreddo | Collater.al
Fabian Albertini
10 photos to discover Fiumefreddo Photo Festival
Photography
10 photos to discover Fiumefreddo Photo Festival
10 photos to discover Fiumefreddo Photo Festival
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There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots

There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

New Zealand photographer Cody Ellingham believes that there are two versions of Hong Kong: a real one that exists with its monumental skyscrapers and one that we remember fondly in our memories. 
The series “Fantasy city by the harbour” – from which a book of photographs was also born – stems precisely from an attempt to try to understand how we can return to the “other” Hong Kong, of which only the dreams and atmospheres dense with neon and people frantically roaming the streets of the Asian city remain.

The shots mainly show the architecture of the city, studied through the calm moments of the metropolis. In fact, people never appear, a challenge considering that Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas on the planet with its 7 million inhabitants.
In the streets, therefore, only silence remains, interrupted by the buzzing of neon lights, which Cody Ellingham uses to accentuate the aesthetic effect of the views, as if they were sets for a futuristic film set in a hyper-technological city of androids and flying machines.
The photographer had the opportunity to study the city during his frequent travels, choosing moments of calm to make even more vivid and real the Hong Kong that persisted in his memories but was difficult to find in everyday life. The fog favours the general suspended atmosphere of the scenes, the large billboards look like TVs left on after falling asleep on the sofa while the lights of the skyscrapers belie the whole thing: the city is not sleeping.

Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots
Photography
There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots
There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots
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Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan

Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

Is it possible for urban man to abandon all stimulus and service of the city to reconnect with an idea of brutal pragmatism dictated by nature? Photographer Daniele Frediani has embarked on a journey to Asia, to some of the territories in which the truth of time and space overpower appearances, consumption and weaknesses of our society.

Frediani in Kyrgyzstan perhaps saw what would happen if we were forced to go back to living as we did centuries and centuries ago, dependent on the cycle of nature and the animal cycle. The shots in his photo series show Kyrgyz nomads as they live by eliminating everything superfluous, decreasing the margin of error, of doubt about what is right or wrong. What the protagonists of these photos have at their disposal is only what their animals have to offer, while all around them are only large grasslands still cold in the Song Kol Lake area.
Living with them is an experience that takes you to another world, a world without time and space: before the Internet and social media, before technology and electricity,” said Daniele Frediani.

Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan
Photography
Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan
Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan
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