Sirante, the all-Italian anonymous street artist

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12 February 2019

We still don't know who is behind the name of Sirante, the Italian street artist who uses his art as a means of denunciation.

The first time we heard about Sirante was when a modern take on Raffaello’s The Fire in the Borgo appeared in the streets of Rome. In the fresco, renamed L’incendio del Nazareno, the faces of the characters have been replaced with those of our politicians such as Berlusconi and Renzi. The work was signed by Sirante, a name, until then, never heard of, but today is one of the most active street artists on the scene. 

sirante | Collater.al
sirante | Collater.al

The hype that has been created around this artist is due in large part to the subjects he chose, or works of classical art revisited in a contemporary key, but also by his unknown identity. Yes, no one knows yet who is behind the name Sirante, a fact that has led several newspapers to call it the Italian Banksy, a nickname that we fully endorse. 

Like the English artist, Sirante also uses his art as a means of denunciation, and his murals are so striking that they do not need a great deal of publicity on social media because it is enough to have dozens of newspapers that punctually testify to the thing and the photos that immortalize the police or carabinieri removing his works from the walls. 

The dismantling took place, for example, with works such as the one depicting Caravaggio’s The Cardsharps, but with the faces of Di Maio, Salvini and Berlusconi, or with the one that represented Salvini in the guise of Guercino’s St. Peter Penitent. The realism of these works is impressive and, since for Sirante the street is a museum, each mural is accompanied by an explanatory plaque, as if they were really exhibited in a gallery. 

sirante | Collater.al

His last work appeared a week ago and shows Salvini in a police sweatshirt taking a selfie in front of one of those windows containing fire extinguishers, but this time behind the glass there are only fake guns. The criticism is far from veiled and the street artist clashes with the bill on legitimate defense.

I don’t know about you, but we can’ t wait for the next work! 

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