We had no answers from Google in 2021

We had no answers from Google in 2021

Tommaso Berra · 6 months ago · Design

2021 is the year we found out we don’t know how to do anything, although the line then between not knowing how to do anything and believing that we do runs along a line of emotionalism and a paralyzing feeling that the pandemic has thickened. From the Digital Natives to the Baby Boomers, the not-knowing-how-to-do-something means only one thing: Google, and the problem shows up in the head in the form of a url, already full of answers, or a title, because after all there is no time (“how to have more time?” we’ll look up later).
2021 is the year we had no answers, so unable to reframe the present by following the pace and speed with which problems, or what we in turn chose to be problems, piled up. All the answers we went looking for on Google, which as every year published Year in Search, the report that analyzes the most searched terms on the search engine during the calendar year. We were so out of answers that, never before as in 2021, we searched for “doomscrolling”. A Nolan metadependence that had us searching for the meaning of what we were doing, at the time we were doing it.

HOW-WHERE-WHEN-WHO-WHY

The search entries collected by Google tell how we didn’t have too much need to know about the “Who” it wasn’t the year of representatives rather of themes, which inspired a discussion of content and not a contest to elect the-best-to. Less so than in 2020, when disbelief was vented in the search for past precedents, in the past year we didn’t need to wonder about the “When” things occurred, so clearly embedded in the present that we couldn’t keep up with Google page refreshes. The “Where” wasn’t a mystery either, Australia, Afghanistan or Capitol Hill were precise geographic coordinates for us, we knew full well what was happening at the time it was happening, there was so much everything that nothingness managed to hide well. compared to the pre-pandemic period, only the “Where to Travel” searches tripled, predictable but not consoling, come to think of it.

What Year in Search highlights is how the “How” searches have been lacking. The question has been asked many times to seek outside solutions. “How to open a business” was typed more times than “How to look for a job,” the all-time high for searches on “how to protect the environment” and “how to protect the community” would be enough to tell the tale of two big shadows that 2021 highlighted. The biggest “How’s” that Google shows us are the ones where the search bar has turned into a help desk, spouting pleas so garbled that they can embarrass Google’s near-divine omniscience. “How to hold on,” “How to heal,” and “How to maintain mental health” are all among the top searches of 2021, never more so than in the past. The discourse about the effects of the pandemic on each of us’ emotional stability won’t be clarified through a series-of-words-divided-by-translations, but 2021 has opened up a new dialogue, evidenced by examples like those of sportswomen Naomi Ōsaka and Simone Biles and complemented by Year in Search.

Google | Collater.al

2021 is the year we discovered we didn’t know how to do anything, trying to collect, by flapping our fingers on the screen, something that seemed to have been taken away from us in previous months. According to Google, this year we didn’t type questions but affirmations, we should-know-things, and it’s preferable that we see in this war on passivity a glass half full. We wanted to be part of the themes, of “sustainability” and “body positivity,” both of which were searched for more than at any time in the past. The video published by Google resizes any intention to see, in our whim of wanting to know everything, selfishness and impatience, showing rather doubts for which we have, only, many-research-results.

 

We had no answers from Google in 2021
Design
We had no answers from Google in 2021
We had no answers from Google in 2021
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The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

San Francisco is one of the most fascinating cities in the United States; over the course of two centuries it has experienced the entire evolution of American civilization firsthand, fostering the birth of artistic and cultural currents that have marked the ages.
The history of San Francisco and the Bay Area more generally is now told in a beautiful volume published by Taschen and entitled “San Francisco. Portrait of a City.” Through 500 photographs it traces the early years of industrial development and the stories of the free spirits of the 1970s through the lights and fervor of the Roaring Twenties.

The volume contains images from archives and private collections, taken by some of the most celebrated photographers, who over the course of their careers have been inspired by the California city. Inside are portraits of the many innovators who have contributed to the development of the city, a place that represents “a crystal ball in which to see a preview of what will come to us in a few years,” as Michele Masneri had described it in The Passenger magazine’s recent volume devoted to the city.
The 480-page collected shots also show a city skyline far from the one we know today, dominated by the Golden Gate Bridge of which construction work from the 1930s is visible. In addition to the Bay Area’s unique climate, “San Francisco. Portrait of a City” also shows areas the multicultural soul of the city, with images of the huge Chinatown district or Fillmore, the one historically home to Jews and Japanese.
You can purchase the book on the official Taschen website.

San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
Photography
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
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Japan as seen in infrared

Japan as seen in infrared

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Hashira Yamamoto is a photographer, but he also describes himself as a traveler and researcher. Over the course of his career as an artist, he has visited 41 countries and 161 cities around the world, in which he has shot some of his photo series, to tell stories i cultures and of all the incredible people he has encountered. Over the years he has had a close look at his home nation of Japan, cultivating a passion for traditional landscapes along the Silk Road.
Yamamoto in his Asuka series has reinterpreted the tradition of historic Japanese buildings through an infrared lens, creating a dialogue between ancient and contemporary Japan to an effect that immerses traditional temples and gardens in a glitchy, vaporwave world.

The saturated colors of the photos alter the perception of a solid tradition that in some respects has remained intact over the centuries. Cultural references are not altered, architectures are not emptied of meaning, but rather taken in a new contemporary guise. Hashira Yamamoto had precisely the goal with this infrared lens to enhance even more the quiet and contemplative magic that testifies to the inherent spirituality of the places photographed. 

Japan as seen in infrared
Photography
Japan as seen in infrared
Japan as seen in infrared
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week, we have selected your 10 best proposals: @polae.jpg, @laurasole_79, @claudiabellati, @carolinalecce, @eli_rmn, @_eleonoram_, @teresa_scafa, @noemily_ph, @matti_b9, @ele.naus.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @zenzeroelimone_, @feebelli, @simeingolo, @davidecannavo, @_barbarac__, @valerycia, @sararotola, @saracamporesi.it, @il_salvo_, @_eleonoram_.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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