Yves Saint Laurent’s love for Morocco

Yves Saint Laurent’s love for Morocco

Andrea Tuzio · 2 months ago · Style

There is a love story involving one of the greatest designers of all time and a country, a city in particular, which with its golden glimpses, wild flora, unique architecture, warmth and friendliness of people knew how to carve a special place in the heart of Yves Saint Laurent.
We are talking about Morocco and Marrakech in particular, the “red city”.

This wonderful and inseparable relationship was born in 1966, 5 years after the birth of his Maison when, together with his partner in life and work Pierre Bergé, he chose the Moroccan city as a destination for a pleasure trip. There they discovered what would become a place of escape first of all and a favorite destination, the Majorelle Garden, “an oasis where the colors of Matisse are mixed with those of nature”.

But let’s take a step back.
The name of the Majorelle gardens derives from that of the painter Jacques Majorelle, son of the French cabinetmaker and designer Louis Majorelle, who in 1919 chose as his home Marrakech and precisely the Medina (the old city). Between 1922 and 1923 he bought a millstone in the north-west of the Medina and, in 1931, commissioned the architect Paul Sinoir to build a Moorish-style villa inside the palm grove.
The house was structured in this way: on the ground floor, there was his large studio while the actual house was on the second floor.
The villa was further embellished by the Majorelle blue walls, a sort of cobalt blue invented by the French painter himself and opened to the public in 1947.

Majorelle was a lover of botany and, inspired by traditional Moroccan gardens, created his own botanical garden. What came out was an incredible and lush tropical garden that surrounded the house, a sort of cathedral made of impressionist shapes and colors, built on a long central basin with several different environments.
A living and moving work of art, with exotic and rare plants, embellished and adorned with fountains, ponds, ceramic vases, paths, and much more.

Going back to 1966 and Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé’s trip to Marrakech, the two discovered the gardens and were delighted.

At that time Majorelle Garden was in a state of semi-abandonment due to high running costs and Majorelle was forced to sell. The garden remained practically unattended. The greatest danger was that of demolition but Saint Laurent could not allow it.

He bought the entire complex in 1980, including the wonderful house of the French artist who was renamed Villa Oasis, restoring it with maniacal attention and choosing to live there. 

The garden was owned by Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé until 2008 when, after the death of the French designer, his ashes were scattered in the rose garden inside the garden. 

Since 2010 the property is owned by the Foundation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent and since 2011 the management is entrusted to the Fondation Jardin Majorelle, a non-profit organization in Marrakech. The development of the garden is still in progress and they are one of the main tourist attractions of Marrakech and attract more than 700,000 visitors every year.

Pierre Bergé was the director of the foundation dedicated to the garden until his death in September 2017.

The villa is home to the Musée Pierre Bergé des Arts Berbères while the former atelier of Majorelle has become the Museum of Islamic Art in Marrakech which houses a collection of North African fabrics from the personal collection of Saint-Laurent, as well as ceramics and jewelry.

In October 2017, Bergé inaugurated the Musée Yves Saint Laurent de Marrakech located a short distance from the Majorelle gardens, in the street named after the French designer.

Built-in terracotta, cement and compacted earth and made by the French architectural firm Studio KO, which has tried to incorporate the lines of the YSL logo into the structure while still embracing the traditional aesthetic that surrounds it. 

The museum boasts permanent and temporary exhibition spaces, some rooms are temperature-controlled to protect the extensive archive collection that includes thousands of original Saint Laurent sketches. There is also an auditorium and a research library that houses a series of books ranging from Arabic and Berber literature and culture to the creations of the French designer. 

We start by talking about a love story that began in 1966 at a stroke and continues today in the memory of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé, two iconic figures from the world of fashion and culture of all time.

Yves Saint Laurent’s love for Morocco
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Yves Saint Laurent’s love for Morocco
Yves Saint Laurent’s love for Morocco
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Nicolas Miller, a neo-noir photographer

Nicolas Miller, a neo-noir photographer

Collater.al Contributors · 4 days ago · Photography

Imagine New York on a winter’s night: thick fog, heavy rain, neon lights reflecting off the wet asphalt, it’s cold, there’s hardly anyone around and it’s like living inside a movie. It’s spectacular, but it’s not just cinema.
Nicolas Miller, a French photographer based in New York, lives the city by night and transports everyone to the dreamy and threatening atmospheres of one of the most evocative metropolises in the world.

The ingredients of his photographs are few but essential: an urban landscape, darkness, threatening weather and half-deserted streets. Nothing else is needed to describe the dark life of the city.

With his photographs, Nicolas Miller succeeds in narrating the different dimensions of New York, analysing its spaces, looking through the illuminated glimpses of skyscrapers and reporting the mysterious stories of those who, like him, walk late at night in solitude.

His shots respect a uniform and coherent visual narrative, they are dramatic images with few bright colors, many contrasts and soft lighting. His dark environments seem to be inspired by the great neo-noir classics of cinema, each shot seeming to be captured from a film scene.

– Read also: The night photographs by Michael McCluskey

Nicolas Miller works in the mist, telling the dark side of New York and setting up mysterious and enigmatic stories.
See a selection of his shots here and follow him on Instagram.

Words by Federica Cimorelli

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The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina

The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina

Giulia Guido · 4 days ago · Photography

At only 22 years old Alexandra Savina has already developed a unique and personal style. The young photographer and creative from Moscow, in fact, has managed to represent with images her strong passion for people. 

Through her shots, very often portraits, Alexandra Savina tells what is hidden behind the faces, or the emotions, the different personalities, breaking down preconceptions and appearances. 

But how does she manage to do it? With the use of color, always full and intense, through unusual and unconventional poses and, last but not least, a touch of extravagance that in addition to never lacking is just that little something extra that will make you want to continue to browse her shots. 

“Photography is my voice, my language, my way of saying “the world is beautiful, people are beautiful, creativity rises within us and it’s essential.” 

This approach to the human figure and its essence has led her to collaborate with several companies including Nike, adidas and StreetBeat, but also to shoot public figures, playing with them and with the camera. 

– Read also: Intense portraits by photographer David Van Dartel

Below you can find a selection of her shots, but to find out more follow Alexandra Savina on Instagram

The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina
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The extravagant portraits by Alexandra Savina
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Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare

Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare

Giulia Guido · 3 days ago · Art, Photography

Born in 1994, Caroline Dare is a young American artist and photographer who now lives and works in Sydney, Australia. Her passion for photography was born when she was still a child and by pure chance, she took some pictures of one of her sisters. 
From that moment on, her love for the lens has never abandoned her. 

Caroline Dare doesn’t set limits for herself: in addition to photographing herself and boys and girls in their intimacy, in stolen moments and on the move, she often shoots her surroundings, whether it’s the landscape seen from the window or a simple object. Anything can prove to be the ideal subject for the perfect shot. 

The style of her shots involves a digital imitation of film grain, which matches the colors and hues of the shots ranging from yellow to blue, to red. Caroline’s are spontaneous photographs that speak to us of freedom, of the body and mind, and of femininity. 

Discover below a selection of her shots and follow Caroline Dare on Instagram not to miss all her work. 

Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare
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Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare
Freedom and femininity in the shots by Caroline Dare
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The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change

The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change

Collater.al Contributors · 3 days ago · Art

The effects of climate change are slowly destroying our planet: glaciers are melting at record speed, ocean temperatures are rising uncontrollably, sea levels are rising inexorably and extreme weather events are continuing unabated. The only way to get this situation under control is to act quickly, but getting the institutions to speak out seems to be very difficult. So what can be done?
The advertising agency TBWA\Helsinki and Helsingin Sanomat, Finland’s most famous newspaper, have recently launched a new and original project in the hope of attracting the attention of those in power. It is called The Climate Crisis Font and is, to all intents and purposes, a font against climate change.

The Climate Crisis Font was created to illustrate climate change and its effects on the planet in a simple and accessible way. It is not a font with a linear and defined shape, but it has a variable structure that can be modified and transformed at will. Its mutability is not accidental, but is based on data collected over the years by the National Snow and Ice Data Center, the US information centre supporting worldwide polar and cryospheric research.

This font follows the transformation of the state of the glaciers over the years, from 1979 to 2020. In addition to showing a dangerous and out-of-control phenomenon, it predicts melting until 2050 and the imminent end of the northern ice cap.

The Climate Crisis Font can be downloaded for free on the official Helsingin Sanomat page, visit the site and watch the project video below.

Words by Federica Cimorelli

The Climate Crisis Font, the font against climate change
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