Cinematography – The Neon Demon

Cinematography – The Neon Demon

Giordana Bonanno · 1 month ago · Photography

Whatever film it is, the intention of Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn is always to impress. With The Neon Demon, a 2016 film, he certainly exceeded expectations by presenting not only a horror thriller but above all a visionary auteur cinema combined with raw and ruthless cinema.

Despite this, the theme on which the narrative is based is simple and immediate: the exaltation of the youthful appearance within the often dehumanized world of fashion. Nicolas tries to dismantle the myth of standardized, sponsored beauty through exasperation at the limits of the horror.

One note worth highlighting is Cliff Martinez’s hypnotic music, which did not simply support the scene but became another character in the story winning public admiration and a “Cannes Soundtrack Award” from critics.

With these assumptions it seems really strange that it was all done on a limited budget, but the great teamwork between the director and director of photography Natasha Brairer supported the whole thing, creating spectacular effects.

She says that she also worked alongside Refn during the two months of preparation, looking for the most suitable locations in which to stage their ideas. For an even more studied linearity they shot the screenplay in chronological order, something that rarely happens in cinema, building an evolving emotional journey with the actors.

Among the stylistic characters that distinguish the director’s work from all the others, colors such as blue and red undoubtedly play a major role; but for this film he was quite sure from the beginning that he would use variations on cyan, turquoise and magenta pink, tones that are certainly softer but which, thanks also to his colour-blindness, were bright and vibrant through the neon lights that invade the scene for much of the film. Refn wants to deliberately detach himself from reality and colour is the medium through which he makes this transition to a dreamy and trance-like world.

Natasha Brairer confirmed: “I always work with colour when I photograph, developing the palette and then painting the film, but this time my palette was more vibrant than any other work done before. It was like jumping into a pool of vivid colours“.

The hypnotic effect of the images is the same with which the artist Tarek Mawad wants to amaze us: writings, codes, lines and blocks of colors are projected on the characters of his shots, through a game of lights that hides and reveals body parts, intriguing and intriguing the viewer. He is a multifaceted artist capable of ranging from 3D animations to mapping projections and light installations: more generally, the artist uses all the elements he is able to exploit to carry out an original narrative.

Its strong cinematographic imprint is certainly the element that convinced us to choose it for the comparison with Refn’s stylistic masterpiece.

Genre: Horror, Thriller

Director: Nicolas Winding Refn

Director of photography: Natasha Brairer

Writer: Nicolas Winding Refn

Cast: Elle Fanning, Christina Hendricks, Keanu Reeves

Cinematography – The Neon Demon
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Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Art

It was February 16, 1990, when one of the most influential and emblematic contemporary artists died prematurely, ripped from life by AIDS. This year, on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of Keith Haring‘s death, the BBC has produced a film that retraces the artist’s story. 

Titled Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the film recounts in just under an hour and a half some of the most emblematic episodes and encounters in Haring’s life. The works are interwoven with images, interviews with Keith himself and unpublished footage from the archives of the Haring Foundation and made available to the BBC. 

Through the artist’s life is also told the New York of the 80s and 90s, the art and creativity that exploded at every corner, but also AIDS and fear. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy is directed by Ben Anthony and was broadcast for the first time on the BBC Two channel on July 4th, but you can watch it again on the BBC streaming site, iPlayer

This fascinating and compelling film – told using previously unheard interviews with Haring, which form the narrative of the documentary – is the definitive story of the artist in his own words. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
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Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
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“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 month ago · Art

Inspired by the great couple Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Leon Keer, one of the most important artists in the world of anamorphic street art, has recently created “Safe House”.

His latest work presents a gift box in trompe l’oeil on the tympanum of a building.
“It is not obvious for everyone to have a roof over their head, your home is precious and gives you comfort and protection, a gift for the necessary needs of life.”

“Safe House” is a packaged house, artfully crafted with a great optical illusion is a tribute to Christo and Jeanne-Claude, it was made for MX29 Graffiti Tour 2020 organized by Ateliers du Graff.
The Dutch artist wants us to reflect on the importance of having a roof over our heads, something that we very often take for granted, but which, as he says, is fundamental.

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Giulia Pacciardi · 4 weeks ago · Art

In the heart of Trastevere, more precisely in Via delle Fratte di Trastevere, on the corner of Via dei Fienaroli, the Roman neighborhood where Ennio Morricone was born and grew up, a new mural dedicated to him stands out since yesterday.
It is the work of the prolific street artist Harry Greb, who is no stranger to this type of tribute. Over the years, in fact, he has titled walls to leading Italian figures of our times such as Alberto Sordi, Anna Magnani and Rino Gaetano.

In Greb’s vision, Morricone looks fixedly at us through his glasses, with a luminous crown resting on his head, the Academy Honorary Award in his left hand and his right hand busy mimicking the gesture of silence.

The opera dedicated to the Roman composer appeared yesterday afternoon, just a few hours after his death which shook the hearts of most.

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

Among the most famous and fascinating artistic techniques, the ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi undoubtedly stands out. It is a practice born from the idea of transforming an imperfection, a damage or a wound into something even more beautiful and perfect. Basically, this technique consists in repairing ceramic objects, even those of daily use such as cups and plates, using gold or cast silver to weld the shards. The final result gives the object a unique look and, what is no small thing, a much higher value than the original. It is precisely from the art of Kintsugi that the artist Glen Martin Taylor was inspired for his works. 

Like the Japanese, Glen Martin Taylor repairs ceramics of all kinds, some made by him and others bought but replacing precious metal with everyday objects, from twine threads to metal elements. 

If in Kintsugi’s art the only important part is that of repair, for the artist the act of reassembling objects is as important as that of destroying them. Through these two phases, the artist frees his emotions and confronts them by creating objects that will eventually have lost their primary purpose, but not their importance. 

Discover all the works by Glen Martin Taylor on his Instagram profile

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
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