CTM Festival 2020: music beyond borders


CTM Festival 2020: music beyond borders


Collater.al Contributors · 2 months ago · Music

CTM Festival 2020 celebrated and evolved the concept of liminality, hybridization and transgression comprehensively considering all of them as are not enough in and of themself.
The Festival drew inspiration from music and contemporary art and offered several inputs to expand the considerations beyond the disciplines and the meaning of boundaries – in their acceptance of multifaceted spiritual practices and social rituals as well as aesthetic, psychedelic, and other transformative experiences. 

Liminal spaces are zones and abstract ideas whose limits and goals remain uncertain: what does it really mean to enjoy music performances in their peeks and limits? What does it mean to interpret arbitrarily arts? What does it really mean a 360° clubbing experience? Could it be exhaustive to examine carefully in advance all the performers and gigs or live an immersive music experience means to let yourself go into a deep and naive journey without preconceptions? 

Based on these reflections, it started our experience at CTM 2020, in Berlin.

The acclaimed HBO series Chernobyl is also known for its remarkable soundtrack.
The sounds of this work are captured from an actual power plant (Ignalina – Lituania), including pumps, reactors, and turbines which created a constant sense of anxiety – performed in a stunning location (Bethonalle –  Silent Garden), earlier used as a former crematorium that operated for only six months before the crematorium was finally closed down.
The overall experience was enriched by acoustic instrumentations and field recordings combined with astonishing changing-lights and smoke-effects.

It has already been written almost everything about Berghain: from the absurd theories about bouncers’ selection strategies to the club’s descriptions as an enchanted black universe full of stairs, corners, dark spots, and hidden places. You can pretty much do whatever you want in this place, and moreover nobody will ever know – if it’s your concern.
Anyway – Thursday night was a soft-clubbing night.
I found interesting the perception that all the people in these ambiguous spaces find ourselves more clearly; it seems that somewhere precarious between a past that is no longer present and an ever-becoming future could help to stimulate both imaginations and freedom – that’s liminality, maybe.

Interstial Spaces

The proposed artistic perspectives in this exhibition open up interpretations of in-betweens and thus, at the same time, question their opposite: the places that are supposedly “real” and concrete. It is thus revealed that unambiguity is arbitrarily produced through coexistence.
The Interstitial Spaces exhibition takes the questions of CTM 2020’s theme beyond the margins of music through an accurate selection of different atmospheres and immersive rooms.

Inferno

In the catastrophic theories on technology and control, the artists Louis-Philippe Demers and Bill Vorn introduce “Inferno,” a participatory robotic performance enacting an experience of hell and punishment. Addressing many persistent anxieties around the relationships between humans and technologies, and the shifting boundaries between them, “Inferno” envisions infinite punishment as endless automation and subordination to the machine, as participants are drawn to the spectacles and thrills of submission.
Participants are divided and split allowed only partial control over their own bodies. In this liminal experience of purgatory, the ambiguous possibility of salvation hangs overhead beguiled audience members, who submit to a spectacle of suffering.

The 2nd night at Berghain was characterized by a lineup full of nu-gabberisms, drum’n’bass evolutions, between anxiety and ecstasy, panic and after-hours enhanced by explosive multi-disciplinary connections – it’s quite rare to become involved in “a unique commission between Uganda’s Nyege Nyege Festival and CTM, Gabber Modus Operandi are joined by Wahono (of Uwalmassa, a Jakarta-based project that explores connections between contemporary electronics and traditional Indonesian sounds), and Uganda’s Nakibembe Xylophone Troupe, one of the few remaining groups that perform on the embaire—an extremely rare and gigantic indigenous wooden xylophone that is simultaneously played by eight musicians.”

You Will Go Away One Day But I Will Not

Through this immersive installation in the tropical greenhouse, Alves and Dalt attempt to open a space for the multifarious voices of the forest—organic and inorganic, human and non-human, speculative and lived—while also pointing to their silencing and erasure by European colonists.
The political impact and the role of communities are quite prominent and create such experiences and practices affect political and cultural impact.
Is it enough to practice forms of experimental politics in a liminal space that has to make do without tangible utopias?

Transmediale – The Eternal Network

The Eternal Network is a group exhibition about the persistence of networks, with a focus on their potentials and limits in response to current social and technological changes.
In times of environmental and political turmoil, networks have lost their mass appeal and are the subject of widespread backlash: blackouts, propaganda, hate speech, addiction, and a human desire to disintermediate from the platforms of surveillance capitalism. Still, networks are ubiquitous, and thus both the poison and cure for the act of organizing within activism and politics alike. With the now more tangible limits of networks in mind, the exhibition asks how effectively they respond to future models of sociality, technology, and politics.
By connecting “The Eternal Network,” critical net cultures, and contemporary artworks, the exhibition closes the loop between the pre- and post-internet moments. With the backlash against networks in mind, it re-examines the legacies of critical net cultures, asking if and how they will continue to have an emancipatory relevance in the future.

CTM 2020 – as they used to highlight – throws itself into limbo in hopes of stimulating a critical discussion of our present and possible futures.
They thrust us into the grey zone between the two sides of a supposedly clear demarcation.

At the end of this all-embracing days in Berlin, we feel like we’re in between. Within ambivalence and perpetual evolution, we float on air without assurance nor sureness – a bit dazed.
How and in what shape will we emerge? What/who will we encounter along the way? Is there anything else beyond this liminal zone?
At Berlin-Tegel gate, we feel like we were fluctuating forms, minds, and bodies both regenerated and deflagrated.

CTM Festival | Collater.al 3

Text by Marco Gardenale
Pictures by CTM

CTM Festival 2020: music beyond borders

Music
CTM Festival 2020: music beyond borders

CTM Festival 2020: music beyond borders

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“The great empty” a project by New York Times

“The great empty” a project by New York Times

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Photography

From Paris to New York, via Munich, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Beijing, Milan, and New Delhi, the New York Times“The great empty”, a new project recounts the lockdown caused by Covid-19.
More and more countries are forced to adopt more or less severe exit restrictions to fight the pandemic. While countries like Italy have adopted total containment rules, other countries have so far “simply” closed a multitude of housing areas. The whole world experiences an unreal atmosphere, public places are abandoned by people and supermarkets are stormed.

The New York Times presents his project at its best: “This current vacuum is a health necessity. It can make you think of dystopia, not progress. But in the end, it also confirms that, by listening to the experts and staying at home, we have not lost our ability to unite for the collective good. These images haunt and will haunt you, they look like apocalyptic films, but in a certain sense they also convey a message of hope“.

The New York Times project contemplates the emptiness created by isolation in places that are usually crowded, chaotic, full of people, but now empty. A way to illustrate and remember the radical change in our habits in these times of global health crisis.
From tourist places to small typical restaurants, it is the absence of life that upsets these clichés, each one more suggestive than the other.

Shots that count the silence of many cities, with the hope that we can return as quickly as possible to everyday life.

“The great empty” a project by New York Times
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“The great empty” a project by New York Times
“The great empty” a project by New York Times
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The magical atmosphere in Nguan’s shots

The magical atmosphere in Nguan’s shots

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

It’s not the first time we talk about Nguan, previously we had dedicated an article to his project that tried to show the concept of globalization through images taken in the streets of cities full of people. 

Now let’s talk about Nguan again because since then we have continued to follow him and his new works deserve more space. 

Among his projects that impressed us the most is City of Dreams, a series of photographs taken in Los Angeles, par excellence a city where people go to make their dreams come true. Unfortunately, not everyone makes it and sometimes the capital of the film and entertainment industry hides corners where dreams are dead, evanescent and lost. 

But if you take the time to take a ride on the Instagram profile too, you’ll discover a different Nguan that offers us almost dreamlike views of cities, illuminated by the light of a sunset that always makes everything more beautiful. Among the many shots, below you can find a selection of photographs taken inside a ferry, where time seems suspended and people are waiting, bored, to arrive at their destination. 

Nguan’s is a delicate world, which surrounds us but often we are not able to see. 

The magical atmosphere in Nguan’s shots
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The magical atmosphere in Nguan’s shots
The magical atmosphere in Nguan’s shots
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Conceptual Food, the photographic series by Michael Crichton

Conceptual Food, the photographic series by Michael Crichton

Giulia Guido · 6 days ago · Photography

Still life has always made us immediately think of something static and detached. After all, what do we expect from a genre that in Italian takes the name of ‘natura morta’. To be able to transform it into something eventful and involving is almost impossible, but someone has succeeded. 

Michael Crichton, the name behind which also hides that of his creative partner Leigh MacMillan, has completely revolutionized the concept of still life with his shots that capture food, as in any still life that wants to be respected, but under a totally different guise. You only need to take a quick look at projects like Conceptual Food to understand that, contrary to what we have always thought, still life is a genre that knows no limits. 

Forget perfectly laid tables, fruit baskets and food positioned in favor of the spectator. The food photographed by Michael Crichton flies from one side of the room to the other, suspended in the air just before it pitifully lands on the ground. The only things left on the table are the shadows of slices of bread, cups of coffee, eggs or mustard. 

The impressive thing about Michael Crichton’s shots is that, despite the great work in post production, every single food we see has actually been thrown in front of the camera lens, not once, not twice, but countless times before we get to the perfect result, so perfect that we find it hard to believe our eyes. 

In addition to being aesthetically satisfying, Michael Crichton’s result has resulted in McDonald’s, Nutella or Kellogg’s a new, fun and dynamic way of presenting a product. 

Ready to see the ordinary turn into the extraordinary?!

PH: Michael Crichton Photo

Conceptual Food, the photographic series by Michael Crichton
Photography
Conceptual Food, the photographic series by Michael Crichton
Conceptual Food, the photographic series by Michael Crichton
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The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots

The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots

Giulia Guido · 5 days ago · Photography

Blackbird fly, blackbird fly / Into the light of the dark black night, sang the Beatles more than fifty years ago, and it is this song, and its message of freedom, that inspired Jamie Johnson in the choice of what is now her stage name, Birdee.

Birdee has been shooting since 2014, when she started with self-portraits. Today, her photographs taken mainly in analogical form are able to analyze the themes of femininity, strength and grace. 

The young girls who are the protagonists of her shots are beautiful, carefree, suspended but not for this reason they are not determined and tenacious. Moreover, the fact that we almost never show their bodies in full and often hide their faces helps us to identify with them. They are nobody, so they can be anyone, even ourselves. 

Scrolling through Birdee’s website or her Instagram profile, you will notice that in addition to female figures there is also another element that always comes back in her shots, real water. It almost seems as if the graceful covers of the girls who shoot are transformed in contact with the waves of the sea or a swimming pool. The little bubbles that caress the skin give light and life to the images. 

Discover a selection of Birdee’s photographs below. 

The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots
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The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots
The freedom without veils in Birdee’s shots
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