Dionisio González’s futuristic cabins in the Norwegian fjords

Dionisio González’s futuristic cabins in the Norwegian fjords

Giulia Guido · 7 months ago · Design

Since its inception, architecture has had two objectives: on the one hand to offer living solutions for the present, and on the other to imagine living solutions for the future. With his latest project, visual designer Dionisio González has dedicated himself to this second strand, imagining futuristic cabins from the past. 

Wittgenstein’s Cabin is the name of the series of cabins that González visualised and transformed into renderings.
The roots of the Spanish visual designer’s work can be found in the life and experience of Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), an Austrian philosopher and logician who around 1914 retired to the Norwegian fjords where he developed a small house overlooking Lake Eidsvatnet in Skjolden, so isolated that it could only be reached by boat. The house was built on a stone platform and was characterised by an asymmetry that led to the rooms being on different floors. 

These are all characteristics that we find in Dionisio González’s cabins, with just one small difference: they seem to come from the distant future. The style and design of the houses is vaguely inspired by that of the 1960s and 1970s – it is impossible not to think of Matti Suuronen’s Futuro House – but they also resemble spaceships ready to leave for other galaxies. 

With a touch of modernity, Dionisio González wanted to recreate that isolated place, surrounded by green fjords and in the middle of a body of water imagined by Ludwig Wittgenstein, but projecting it into the future. 

Dionisio González Wittgenstein's Cabin | Collater.al-008
Dionisio González Wittgenstein's Cabin | Collater.al-008
Dionisio González Wittgenstein's Cabin | Collater.al-008
Dionisio González Wittgenstein's Cabin | Collater.al-008
Dionisio González Wittgenstein's Cabin | Collater.al-008
Dionisio González Wittgenstein's Cabin | Collater.al-008
Dionisio González’s futuristic cabins in the Norwegian fjords
Design
Dionisio González’s futuristic cabins in the Norwegian fjords
Dionisio González’s futuristic cabins in the Norwegian fjords
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @effyrose__, @niinque, @saraperacchia, @jus._._._, @nuovi_obiettivi_, @serenabiaginiph, @nellys.ph, @matti_b9, @franscescaersilia1, @kevin.ponzuoli.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots

There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

New Zealand photographer Cody Ellingham believes that there are two versions of Hong Kong: a real one that exists with its monumental skyscrapers and one that we remember fondly in our memories. 
The series “Fantasy city by the harbour” – from which a book of photographs was also born – stems precisely from an attempt to try to understand how we can return to the “other” Hong Kong, of which only the dreams and atmospheres dense with neon and people frantically roaming the streets of the Asian city remain.

The shots mainly show the architecture of the city, studied through the calm moments of the metropolis. In fact, people never appear, a challenge considering that Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas on the planet with its 7 million inhabitants.
In the streets, therefore, only silence remains, interrupted by the buzzing of neon lights, which Cody Ellingham uses to accentuate the aesthetic effect of the views, as if they were sets for a futuristic film set in a hyper-technological city of androids and flying machines.
The photographer had the opportunity to study the city during his frequent travels, choosing moments of calm to make even more vivid and real the Hong Kong that persisted in his memories but was difficult to find in everyday life. The fog favours the general suspended atmosphere of the scenes, the large billboards look like TVs left on after falling asleep on the sofa while the lights of the skyscrapers belie the whole thing: the city is not sleeping.

Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
Cody Ellingham | Collater.al
There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots
Photography
There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots
There are two different Hong Kongs in Cody Ellingham’s shots
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Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan

Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Is it possible for urban man to abandon all stimulus and service of the city to reconnect with an idea of brutal pragmatism dictated by nature? Photographer Daniele Frediani has embarked on a journey to Asia, to some of the territories in which the truth of time and space overpower appearances, consumption and weaknesses of our society.

Frediani in Kyrgyzstan perhaps saw what would happen if we were forced to go back to living as we did centuries and centuries ago, dependent on the cycle of nature and the animal cycle. The shots in his photo series show Kyrgyz nomads as they live by eliminating everything superfluous, decreasing the margin of error, of doubt about what is right or wrong. What the protagonists of these photos have at their disposal is only what their animals have to offer, while all around them are only large grasslands still cold in the Song Kol Lake area.
Living with them is an experience that takes you to another world, a world without time and space: before the Internet and social media, before technology and electricity,” said Daniele Frediani.

Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani | Collater.al
Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan
Photography
Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan
Daniele Frediani’s journey among the nomadic peoples of Kyrgyzstan
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Trevor Traynor’s search among newsstands around the world

Trevor Traynor’s search among newsstands around the world

Tommaso Berra · 3 weeks ago · Photography

Behind those stacks of newspapers, children’s magazines and packs of figurines, it is difficult to see the newsagents and newsagents in their faces. Accomplice to the cramped space and plexiglass windows the figures who give us newspapers every day always appear a bit in the shadows, enclosed in 3 square meters in which everything seems to fit together with incredible balance.
Photographer Trevor Traynor in his series “Newsstands” focused precisely on the faces of these figures, portrayed in front of or directly inside their newsstands. It is a series that began in 2012, using only an iPhone 4s and concluded seven years later, with an iPhone 11 Promax.
Trevor Traynor not only photographed the newsstands in his city, but as a great explorer he traveled through 20 cities around the world, from the United States to Egypt and Japan.
The work also turned into a series of 100 NFTs and a physical event set up in Los Angeles.
You can see the entire series on the photographer’s Instagram profile and official website.

Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.alTrevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor | Collater.al
Trevor Traynor’s search among newsstands around the world
Photography
Trevor Traynor’s search among newsstands around the world
Trevor Traynor’s search among newsstands around the world
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