Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to open in 2026

Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to open in 2026

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Design

Work has officially begun on the Abu Dhabi Guggenheim, which will be built on Saadiyat Island in the Persian Gulf, famous for housing some of the city’s most modern buildings. The museum will be built right next to the already famous Louvre in Abu Dhabi, forming a sort of museum district. 

The project was entrusted to Frank Gehry back in 2006. Since then, work has been delayed and rescheduled until a few days ago, during a conference, the director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation Richard Armstrong confirmed that work will begin shortly and that the museum will open in 2026. 

The building will be on four different levels connected by glass bridges and the spaces will occupy an area of about 30,000 square metres with a total of 13,000 square metres of exhibition space. The design includes different plaster blocks interspersed with eleven cone-shaped structures with reflective surfaces. 

This division of space will allow curators to organise different exhibitions, divided between the various galleries formed by the cone-shaped structures, but also to use the different areas as an educational centre and a theatre with a capacity of 350 seats where conferences, projections, performances and shows can be organised.

Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Abu Dhabi reflects in all its splendour the mood of the city and the style of the famous architect. 

Guggenheim di Abu Dhabi
Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to open in 2026
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Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to open in 2026
Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to open in 2026
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Wearable bodies by Daisy Collingridje

Wearable bodies by Daisy Collingridje

Collater.al Contributors · 2 weeks ago · Art, Design

Most of the time, art cannot be touched. There is an insurmountable limit between us and the artwork, we never actually make contact. Daisy Collingridje‘s sculptures are an exception.   

daisy collingridje

Works to wear, fabric bodies that tempt the observer with the softness and gentleness of their forms: Squishies are art to be touched. This is how the artist affectionately describes her jersey and cotton-wool sculptures, layers of quilts assembled by creative instinct guided by the materials.

daisy collingridje

In her work fabric becomes a second skin, while inimitable shapes celebrate the flesh and movement of bodies. On the borderline between craftsmanship and fashion, a world in which Daisy took her first steps until she saw her first garment come to life and “dance as if no one was watching”. 

The Squishies do not affirm or deny any ideal prototype of a body, they are a representation of the incredible mechanism of all bodies. “We are all made up of the same basic elements – says the artist – but we remain unique individuals”, just like her works. Each one with its own personality that Daisy recognizes starting from the head, from where she begins to sculpt inspired by their character.

Irresistible to the touch, soft and warm, Daisy Collingridje‘s fabric bodies don’t last forever, just as real ones are subject to time, movement and wear. With soft lines and a warm color palette, the artist transforms human anatomy into a means of expression, diversity into joy and art. 

A new way of sculpting that takes its cue from the pastel works of Paolo Puck, who shares with the artist the reassuring chromatic balance, the sense of familiarity and unease. Proceeding by simplification, as in the figurative paintings of Caroline Coon where the musculature becomes an expressive feature.

daisy collingridje

The Squishies move in a suspended time, as in the dreamlike and chaotic world of Lily Macrae or in the movement studies of Pina Bausch and Yoann Bourgeois. They live in a parallel reality where the human body is composed and decomposed into forms, that dance and give life to an art literally at your fingertips.

Article by Chiara Sabella

Wearable bodies by Daisy Collingridje
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Wearable bodies by Daisy Collingridje
Wearable bodies by Daisy Collingridje
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Italy and Poland united by street art

Italy and Poland united by street art

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Art

We have seen many times how art can break down walls between different cultures and build bridges by uniting distant countries with different histories. It is precisely for this reason, and with this intention, that “Frammenti di Polonia” was created, a project conceived by the Polish National Tourist Board to promote the heritage of the cities of Krakow and Wroclaw in our country, particularly in our capital city. 

Krakow and Wroclaw are two cities in Poland, the first in the east of the country and the second further west, the former much better known and half-touristy and the latter slowly on the rise, but both share a centuries-old history and a not inconsiderable architectural, artistic and cultural wealth. 

There are countless monuments decorating the streets of these cities, and from the beginning of October, two of them can also be seen in the heart of Rome. No, don’t start thinking about helicopters, planes, cables and absurd ways of moving monuments. Nothing of the sort has happened. Much more simply, the Polish National Tourist Board turned to Sbagliato, an art project founded in 2011 by an architect and two Roman designers. 

For “Frammenti di Polonia” the three artists chose a monument from each of the two Polish cities and reproduced them in two of Rome’s most famous neighbourhoods, Trastevere and Testaccio

In Via San Calisto 6A in Trastevere, one can see the reproduction of a bas-relief depicting dancers decorating the façade of a late 19th century building in Krakow’s Kazimierz district, while outside the Testaccio district market, a rectangular frame of a window has been installed through which one can see the Gothic-style windows of Wroclaw station. 

Frammenti di Polonia
Italy and Poland united by street art
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Italy and Poland united by street art
Italy and Poland united by street art
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So there are video games on Netflix?

So there are video games on Netflix?

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Art

We have been talked about a lot in recent days about games on Netflix. Particularly of the violent ones in which new phenomenon Squid Game‘s characters must participate. “A very good chance it’s going to be our biggest show ever.” as stated by Ted Sarandos, co-CEO of Netflix. Luckily, Netflix users don’t have to participate and risk being killed by a robot child, but they can access new video games, recently available on the site’s homepage.

After the rumors of last summer and the officiality arrived in the following days, Netflix has integrated the streaming service, starting from September 28th, with five video games, inspired by famous titles on the platform. Stranger Things: 1984, Stranger Things 3: The Game, Card Blast, Teeter Up and Shooting Hoops are displayed as icons in the mobile version and can be downloaded for free, for the moment only for Android devices.
The games were not developed by Netflix but were already present on the Play Store. However, this is a sign of the streaming service’s opening to the world of gaming, after interactive movies such as Black Mirror: Bandersnatch or Minecraft: Story Mode.
The idea is to conceive of movies not as products that end with the seasons of a series, and not even in the 2 hours of the film, but rather as a dilated plot. While the strategy has been applied to cinema for decades, Netflix has encapsulated it in a single platform, creating a continuity of language and entertainment.

So there are video games on Netflix?
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So there are video games on Netflix?
So there are video games on Netflix?
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Moneyless’ work on a basketball court in Oste

Moneyless’ work on a basketball court in Oste

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Art

An explosion of colourful shapes and lines has invaded Oste, thanks to the urban artwork created by Moneyless in the park in Via Palarciano. 

The Milanese artist, born Teo Pirisi, worked on the floor of the basketball court in the park where, thanks to the collaboration of the project curator GianGuido Grassi and the stART – Open your eyes Association, he created a floor work that presents all the typical characteristics of his art. 

The surface has been divided into coloured areas and along all the lines of the field Moneyless has created his classic circles in series, which have now become the symbol of his murals. 

The artist had to deal with a considerable amount of work, and he said: “it is normal for me to do works of this size, but this is the first time I have done them on the ground. It was a way to test myself on something I had been storing for a long time“.

The Moneyless artwork is part of a larger project that involved the renovation of the entire park area, which included redoing the pathways, rainwater management and the entire play area. 

In this redevelopment plan, art plays a central role, giving new life to a space which it is hoped will become a place for new generations to meet and exchange ideas. 

This value was also emphasised by former basketball player Jack Galanda, present last Saturday at the official opening, who quoted a line from the film Field of Dreams, saying: “if you build it, they will come. It is important to give the boys the opportunity to play basketball outdoors and to be together. This court should be experienced, cared for and copied elsewhere“. 

Read more: The new playgrounds decorated by Gummy Gue

See photos of Moneyless’ work in Oste below and follow him on Instagram to keep up with his upcoming work. 

Moneyless
Moneyless
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Moneyless’ work on a basketball court in Oste
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Moneyless’ work on a basketball court in Oste
Moneyless’ work on a basketball court in Oste
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