Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”

Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”

Giulia Guido · 9 months ago · Art

I know you still have your handkerchiefs in hand and that you too are thinking that after all these hugs and these collective moments from the next episode we should say goodbye to some of our favorite heroes, but for now we start to look more closely at the second episode, entitled “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms“, of the eighth season of Game of Thrones.

First of all you have to note that it’s the first time that we are in front of an episode entirely set in one place, in Winterfell, which gives us a sense of protection, of home. But let’s proceed…

Opening credits

After seven seasons, we have now learned that the opening credits are of fundamental importance. In this second episode, we notice only two small differences compared to the first one. First of all, Last Hearth, the castle of the House of Umber in which, in the last episode, we found Tormund and Beric, we see it surrounded by ice-colored tiles, a sign that the White Walkers have arrived there. 

Then, moving towards Winterfell, we see the stronghold of Stark ready for battle, with trenches surrounding the entire castle. 

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

Jaime and Brienne

The real protagonists of this episode are Jaime Lannister and Brienne of Tarth, and there are three fundamental scenes that we must analyze more thoroughly. 

The first is the initial one with which the episode opens, Jaime is ahead of Daenerys, Jon, Sansa and all others and is called to explain his decision to abandon Cersei and join the cause of Winterfell. The character is perhaps one of the few who has had a drastic change since the beginning of the series. Do you remember this when he first came to Stark’s Castle?! Now we see a deeply repentant Jaime and his only response to the mother of the dragons, “Because this goes beyond loyalty. This is about survival.” recalls Brienne’s words to Dragonpit, “Oh fuck loyalty. This goes beyond houses and honor and oaths”. 

Despite this, Daenerys still doesn’t seem convinced, but luckily Brienne is the one who takes sides with the King’s exterminator and manages to persuade Sansa.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

Jaime’s repentance reaches such a point that he humbly asks Bran for forgiveness, another character who is completely distant from the little boy of the first season. 

The second important scene is when, outside the walls, Jaime and Brienne talk, and everyone has their own sword in their hands. Let us remember that the two swords were forged by melting Ice, Ned Stark’s Valyrian steel sword, which was taken from him after being arrested at King’s Landing.

The two swords, wanted by Tywin Lannister were given as a gift to Jaime, who in turn gave it to Brienne, and the other to King Joffrey who, after his death, was taken by the exterminator of King. 

So, with Jaime and Brienne together with Winterfell, it is as if Ice had returned home.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

The third and, perhaps most important, is the one from which the title of the episode takes its name, that is, the nomination as Knight of Brienne by Jaime

This scene refers to another book by George R.R. Martin “Tales of Dunk and Egg” in which the protagonist is Ser Duncan l’Alto, enclosed in a volume with three other novels entitled, precisely A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms. The same writer has confirmed that Ser Duncan is an ancestor of Brienne who, with this ceremony that has managed to give us goosebumps, has finally become a knight to all intents and purposes.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

Arya and Gendry

Then comes one of the most anticipated moments and that has divided the audience more. 

The story between the little Stark and Gendry has finally a climax. It’s this love scene that divided the fans, between those who couldn’t wait and those who still think that Arya’s character didn’t need a man, who shouldn’t give in to feelings like that. 

This relationship makes us immediately think of one of the scenes on which the whole series is based, that of the pilot episode in which Ned and Robert, in the crypt, speak and the King reminds his friend Stark that he has a son and a daughter to join. At the time the reference was clear to Joffrey and Sansa, today we all think they could be Gendry and Arya.

gam of thrones 8 | Collater.al

References

As in the first episode, also in this one the references continue. 

The first one is about Tyrion, which offers exactly the same sentence said in the first season “I always pictured myself dying in my bed, at the age of 80 with a belly full of wine and girl’s mouth around my cock”. To underline the fact that it’s a phrase already heard, we see Jaime ending it in his place. 

Another obvious reference is the little girl who shows up in front of Ser Davos and Gilly asking for food and who seems to be ready for the battle. The little girl has a scar that covers half her face and can’t help but remind us of Princess Shireen Baratheon. 

It is no coincidence that in this scene there are just Ser Davos and Gilly. It was Stannis’ daughter who taught them how to read.

gam of thrones 8 | Collater.al

Jenny’s Song

One of the most touching moments is when Podrick, in front of the fire in the company of Jaime, Tyrion, Ser Davos, Tormund and Brienne, sings the notes of a song that seems to arrive in all the rooms of Winterfell. 

The song, renamed Jenny of Oldstone, is not the first time it appears in the series and we put here the full lyrics of Podrick’s version:

“High in the halls of the kings who are gone
The ones she had lost and the ones she had found
And the ones who had loved her the most
The ones who’d been gone for so very long
She couldn’t remember their names
“They spun her around on the damp old stones
Spun away all her sorrow and pain
And she never wanted to leave
Never wanted to leave (x5)”

During the closing credits, Jenny Of Oldstone returns in the version sung by Florence and the Machine.

For the rest, the episode is a collection of collective moments, as if we were preparing to give the final farewell to the characters. After discussing the plans of war each prepares in its own way, with loved ones at your side.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3


The episode ends with the arrival of the Army of the Dead in Winterfell, which interrupts Jon and Daenerys just as he reveals his true identity.

We just have to wait.

Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”
Art
Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”
Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”
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Wisteria tunnel in the Japanese city of Kitakyushu

Wisteria tunnel in the Japanese city of Kitakyushu

Claudia Fuggetti · 9 months ago · Art

The world’s largest wisteria tunnel is located inside the Kawachi Fuji Gardens in Kitakyushu, Japan and has conquered the web. These are more than 150 plants of Wisteria, the scientific name of the wisteria, which give sensations, peace and harmony to all those who find themselves walking nearby.

The different color shades are given by the great variety of species of wisteria present in the gardens: they are more than 20 types of flowers, all different from each other.

Among the most interesting curiosities about this flower, we find the one concerning the Buddhist religion: the wisteria represents both prayer and meditation, and the transience of life. We also remember that the color purple was associated by Kandinsky to the spiritual dimension.

Japan is full of these wonderful flowers, which have recently also had a boom on Instagram and, more generally, on the web.

Il tunnel di glicine nella città giapponese di Kitakyushu | Collater.al
Il tunnel di glicine nella città giapponese di Kitakyushu | Collater.al

 

 

 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da João Victor Santos (@jovidesigners) in data:

Il tunnel di glicine nella città giapponese di Kitakyushu | Collater.al
Il tunnel di glicine nella città giapponese di Kitakyushu | Collater.al
Il tunnel di glicine nella città giapponese di Kitakyushu | Collater.al

Wisteria tunnel in the Japanese city of Kitakyushu
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Wisteria tunnel in the Japanese city of Kitakyushu
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Rorschach, the irreverent installation by CJ Hendry

Rorschach, the irreverent installation by CJ Hendry

Claudia Fuggetti · 9 months ago · Art

Rorschach is the name of the new work signed by the Australian artist CJ Hendry, which has been compared by many, both for the atmosphere and for the type of installation to “a psychiatric ward that imitates the Wonderland”.

In fact, huge inflatable walls are very reminiscent of games in amusement parks, while the etymology of the name Rorschach is found in the psychological test that analyzes patients through their perception of ink stains and analyzes the salient traits of the personality.

The work has been exhibited at a 279 square metre warehouse in Dumbo, a district of New York City: the particular setting suggests the imaginary interior of a psychiatric hospital. The warehouse space has been set up with soft white floors and walls, reminiscent of the padded walls of hospital rooms in asylums.

Inside the inflatable labyrinth, visitors find themselves in front of Hendry‘s revisitation of the Rorschach, confronted with a series of hyper-real colors drawings also called “squish paintings”.

Rorschach, the irreverent installation by CJ Hendry
Art
Rorschach, the irreverent installation by CJ Hendry
Rorschach, the irreverent installation by CJ Hendry
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Mohamed L’Ghacham, family photos become murals

Mohamed L’Ghacham, family photos become murals

Claudia Fuggetti · 9 months ago · Art

Mohamed L’Ghacham is a Moroccan artist from Barcelona who paints large murals based on scenes from vintage family photos. Very often using those that are counted among the “photographic incidents”, the artist paints salient scenes typical of family life.

Here the personal and apparently unimportant moments acquire a new meaning and become emotionally resonant for the spectators, even though they have never met the families portrayed. The soft colours in Mohamed’s murals echo the retro tones of the filters in the photographic films.

It is not difficult to identify one of these scenes with those experienced together with one’s family: the individual experience becomes a collective story, which makes us a real community.

Find out more in the video below and have a look at our gallery:

Mohamed L'Ghacham, family photos become murals | Collater.al
Mohamed L'Ghacham, family photos become murals | Collater.al
Mohamed L'Ghacham, family photos become murals | Collater.al
Mohamed L'Ghacham, family photos become murals | Collater.al
Mohamed L’Ghacham, family photos become murals
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Mohamed L’Ghacham, family photos become murals
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Timeless sculptures by Carla Cascales Alimbau

Timeless sculptures by Carla Cascales Alimbau

Claudia Fuggetti · 9 months ago · Art

Carla Cascales Alimbau is an artist from Barcelona who has made irregularity the main merit of her favourite art form: sculpture. Characterized by a palette of neutral tones, materials such as macael stone, wood and glass, Carla manipulates the shapes of her objects to create minimal and timeless interiors.

Tulip Noire and Tulip Crème are the names of two works composed of circular slabs of black smashed and cream marble. They take up approaches typical of Kintsugi’s Japanese art, such as: working with broken, crushed or irregular materials and enhancing signs of wear.

Seda, on the other hand, is the name of the limited series of twisted shaped glass objects:

“Glass is a material in which hardness and fragility coexist in balance; during the molding of the piece it broke and repaired itself, creating a scar of glass that becomes a beauty trait”.

Carla’s propensity to see beauty in the worn out enhances authenticity above perfection.

Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Le sculture senza tempo di Carla Cascales Alimbau | Collater.al
Timeless sculptures by Carla Cascales Alimbau
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Timeless sculptures by Carla Cascales Alimbau
Timeless sculptures by Carla Cascales Alimbau
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