Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”

Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Art

I know you still have your handkerchiefs in hand and that you too are thinking that after all these hugs and these collective moments from the next episode we should say goodbye to some of our favorite heroes, but for now we start to look more closely at the second episode, entitled “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms“, of the eighth season of Game of Thrones.

First of all you have to note that it’s the first time that we are in front of an episode entirely set in one place, in Winterfell, which gives us a sense of protection, of home. But let’s proceed…

Opening credits

After seven seasons, we have now learned that the opening credits are of fundamental importance. In this second episode, we notice only two small differences compared to the first one. First of all, Last Hearth, the castle of the House of Umber in which, in the last episode, we found Tormund and Beric, we see it surrounded by ice-colored tiles, a sign that the White Walkers have arrived there. 

Then, moving towards Winterfell, we see the stronghold of Stark ready for battle, with trenches surrounding the entire castle. 

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

Jaime and Brienne

The real protagonists of this episode are Jaime Lannister and Brienne of Tarth, and there are three fundamental scenes that we must analyze more thoroughly. 

The first is the initial one with which the episode opens, Jaime is ahead of Daenerys, Jon, Sansa and all others and is called to explain his decision to abandon Cersei and join the cause of Winterfell. The character is perhaps one of the few who has had a drastic change since the beginning of the series. Do you remember this when he first came to Stark’s Castle?! Now we see a deeply repentant Jaime and his only response to the mother of the dragons, “Because this goes beyond loyalty. This is about survival.” recalls Brienne’s words to Dragonpit, “Oh fuck loyalty. This goes beyond houses and honor and oaths”. 

Despite this, Daenerys still doesn’t seem convinced, but luckily Brienne is the one who takes sides with the King’s exterminator and manages to persuade Sansa.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

Jaime’s repentance reaches such a point that he humbly asks Bran for forgiveness, another character who is completely distant from the little boy of the first season. 

The second important scene is when, outside the walls, Jaime and Brienne talk, and everyone has their own sword in their hands. Let us remember that the two swords were forged by melting Ice, Ned Stark’s Valyrian steel sword, which was taken from him after being arrested at King’s Landing.

The two swords, wanted by Tywin Lannister were given as a gift to Jaime, who in turn gave it to Brienne, and the other to King Joffrey who, after his death, was taken by the exterminator of King. 

So, with Jaime and Brienne together with Winterfell, it is as if Ice had returned home.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

The third and, perhaps most important, is the one from which the title of the episode takes its name, that is, the nomination as Knight of Brienne by Jaime

This scene refers to another book by George R.R. Martin “Tales of Dunk and Egg” in which the protagonist is Ser Duncan l’Alto, enclosed in a volume with three other novels entitled, precisely A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms. The same writer has confirmed that Ser Duncan is an ancestor of Brienne who, with this ceremony that has managed to give us goosebumps, has finally become a knight to all intents and purposes.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3

Arya and Gendry

Then comes one of the most anticipated moments and that has divided the audience more. 

The story between the little Stark and Gendry has finally a climax. It’s this love scene that divided the fans, between those who couldn’t wait and those who still think that Arya’s character didn’t need a man, who shouldn’t give in to feelings like that. 

This relationship makes us immediately think of one of the scenes on which the whole series is based, that of the pilot episode in which Ned and Robert, in the crypt, speak and the King reminds his friend Stark that he has a son and a daughter to join. At the time the reference was clear to Joffrey and Sansa, today we all think they could be Gendry and Arya.

gam of thrones 8 | Collater.al

References

As in the first episode, also in this one the references continue. 

The first one is about Tyrion, which offers exactly the same sentence said in the first season “I always pictured myself dying in my bed, at the age of 80 with a belly full of wine and girl’s mouth around my cock”. To underline the fact that it’s a phrase already heard, we see Jaime ending it in his place. 

Another obvious reference is the little girl who shows up in front of Ser Davos and Gilly asking for food and who seems to be ready for the battle. The little girl has a scar that covers half her face and can’t help but remind us of Princess Shireen Baratheon. 

It is no coincidence that in this scene there are just Ser Davos and Gilly. It was Stannis’ daughter who taught them how to read.

gam of thrones 8 | Collater.al

Jenny’s Song

One of the most touching moments is when Podrick, in front of the fire in the company of Jaime, Tyrion, Ser Davos, Tormund and Brienne, sings the notes of a song that seems to arrive in all the rooms of Winterfell. 

The song, renamed Jenny of Oldstone, is not the first time it appears in the series and we put here the full lyrics of Podrick’s version:

“High in the halls of the kings who are gone
The ones she had lost and the ones she had found
And the ones who had loved her the most
The ones who’d been gone for so very long
She couldn’t remember their names
“They spun her around on the damp old stones
Spun away all her sorrow and pain
And she never wanted to leave
Never wanted to leave (x5)”

During the closing credits, Jenny Of Oldstone returns in the version sung by Florence and the Machine.

For the rest, the episode is a collection of collective moments, as if we were preparing to give the final farewell to the characters. After discussing the plans of war each prepares in its own way, with loved ones at your side.

game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3
game of thrones 8 a night of the seven kingdoms | Collater.al 3


The episode ends with the arrival of the Army of the Dead in Winterfell, which interrupts Jon and Daenerys just as he reveals his true identity.

We just have to wait.

Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”
Art
Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”
Game of Thrones 8: The full analysis of the second episode “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”
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Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Art

It was February 16, 1990, when one of the most influential and emblematic contemporary artists died prematurely, ripped from life by AIDS. This year, on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of Keith Haring‘s death, the BBC has produced a film that retraces the artist’s story. 

Titled Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the film recounts in just under an hour and a half some of the most emblematic episodes and encounters in Haring’s life. The works are interwoven with images, interviews with Keith himself and unpublished footage from the archives of the Haring Foundation and made available to the BBC. 

Through the artist’s life is also told the New York of the 80s and 90s, the art and creativity that exploded at every corner, but also AIDS and fear. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy is directed by Ben Anthony and was broadcast for the first time on the BBC Two channel on July 4th, but you can watch it again on the BBC streaming site, iPlayer

This fascinating and compelling film – told using previously unheard interviews with Haring, which form the narrative of the documentary – is the definitive story of the artist in his own words. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
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Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
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“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 month ago · Art

Inspired by the great couple Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Leon Keer, one of the most important artists in the world of anamorphic street art, has recently created “Safe House”.

His latest work presents a gift box in trompe l’oeil on the tympanum of a building.
“It is not obvious for everyone to have a roof over their head, your home is precious and gives you comfort and protection, a gift for the necessary needs of life.”

“Safe House” is a packaged house, artfully crafted with a great optical illusion is a tribute to Christo and Jeanne-Claude, it was made for MX29 Graffiti Tour 2020 organized by Ateliers du Graff.
The Dutch artist wants us to reflect on the importance of having a roof over our heads, something that we very often take for granted, but which, as he says, is fundamental.

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Art
“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Giulia Pacciardi · 4 weeks ago · Art

In the heart of Trastevere, more precisely in Via delle Fratte di Trastevere, on the corner of Via dei Fienaroli, the Roman neighborhood where Ennio Morricone was born and grew up, a new mural dedicated to him stands out since yesterday.
It is the work of the prolific street artist Harry Greb, who is no stranger to this type of tribute. Over the years, in fact, he has titled walls to leading Italian figures of our times such as Alberto Sordi, Anna Magnani and Rino Gaetano.

In Greb’s vision, Morricone looks fixedly at us through his glasses, with a luminous crown resting on his head, the Academy Honorary Award in his left hand and his right hand busy mimicking the gesture of silence.

The opera dedicated to the Roman composer appeared yesterday afternoon, just a few hours after his death which shook the hearts of most.

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

Among the most famous and fascinating artistic techniques, the ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi undoubtedly stands out. It is a practice born from the idea of transforming an imperfection, a damage or a wound into something even more beautiful and perfect. Basically, this technique consists in repairing ceramic objects, even those of daily use such as cups and plates, using gold or cast silver to weld the shards. The final result gives the object a unique look and, what is no small thing, a much higher value than the original. It is precisely from the art of Kintsugi that the artist Glen Martin Taylor was inspired for his works. 

Like the Japanese, Glen Martin Taylor repairs ceramics of all kinds, some made by him and others bought but replacing precious metal with everyday objects, from twine threads to metal elements. 

If in Kintsugi’s art the only important part is that of repair, for the artist the act of reassembling objects is as important as that of destroying them. Through these two phases, the artist frees his emotions and confronts them by creating objects that will eventually have lost their primary purpose, but not their importance. 

Discover all the works by Glen Martin Taylor on his Instagram profile

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
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