Heath Kane redesigns George Orwell’s literary classics

Heath Kane redesigns George Orwell’s literary classics

Federica Cimorelli · 1 year ago · Art

January 2021 will mark the 70th anniversary of the death of George Orwell, one of Britain’s and the world’s most iconic writers. His literary works were a scathing social critique of totalitarianism and an outspoken support for democratic socialism.
For more than half a century, his writings have been bestsellers at the UK publishing house Penguin, but this year’s anniversary marks the cancellation of all copyrights. In order to celebrate the writer and conclude the exclusive publications, the publishing house has created a special collaboration with the British artist Heath Kane.

Under the creative direction of Suzanne Dean, Heath Kane has created new covers for four of Orwell’s great classics. The selected titles are Animal Farm, 1984, Down and Out in Paris and London and Homage to Catalonia.

George Orwell began working with Penguin back in the 1940s and since then his titles have not only been literary landmarks for all, but also a constant source of inspiration for lovers of illustration and book cover design. Here is a selection of the best.

ANIMAL FARM
Animal Farm was first published by Penguin in 1951, its original design created by Edward Young and perfected by typographer Jan Tschichold. The best covers include the 1965 cover by Paul Hogarth, the late 1980s designed by Ditz and the unmistakable 2008 cover by Shepard Fairey. And let’s not forget the 2013 version by Den Pearson and finally the 2016 and 2020 versions by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Heath Kane’s new proposal closes the circle.

1984
George Orwell first published 1984 with Penguin in 1954. Among the most iconic covers we cannot fail to mention the 1962 cover by Germano Facetti, the 1966 cover by William Roberts, the 1980 version photographed by Humphrey Sutton, the 2000 edition designed by Stephen Conroy, the unmistakable 2008 cover by Shepard Fairey, then the 2020 version by Coralie Bickford-Smith and finally the new creation by Heath Kane.

DOWN AND OUT IN PARIS AND LONDON
Also for Down and Out in Paris and London, the first edition for Penguin was by Germano Facetti, 1962. Then we find, in order, Bill Brandt’s 1998 version, Shepard Fairey’s 2008 version, David Pearson’s 2013 version and Heath Kane’s new proposal of 2021.

HOMAGE TO CATALONIA
Penguin’s versions of Homage to Catalonia feature Romek Marber 1961, Christopher Corr in 1987, Joàn Miró in 2000 and a Robert Capa photograph in 2013. Finally, Heath Kane’s new graphic proposal.

As well as packaging some of the greatest literary texts in history, these covers make George Orwell’s books highly sought-after collectors’ items for all design and art lovers.
The versions created by Heath Kane were launched on the market in early January and are now available for purchase worldwide on the official website of the British publisher Penguin.

Words by Federica Cimorelli

Heath Kane redesigns George Orwell’s literary classics
Art
Heath Kane redesigns George Orwell’s literary classics
Heath Kane redesigns George Orwell’s literary classics
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Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport

Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport

Tommaso Berra · 3 days ago · Photography

It could not have been easy to fly a drone inside a 20-square-meter squash court, but photographer Brad Walls felt it was the only way to enhance geometry and movement in a few shots. The “Vacant” series depicts the geometry of bodies, moving a choreographed within scenes inspired by surrealism and retro-futurism.
The idea of choosing that particular location came from a visit by the artist to the squash court in which he played in his high school days. The empty space the lines of the field inspired the artist to create one of his aerial series, which had at its center the human body detached from the context but perfectly inserted into the geometric layout.

Squash | Collater.al

One of Brad Walls’ challenges was to avoid a claustrophobic effect, so white is the predominant color in the shots, repeated even in the models’ clothes, a choice that would make even Wimbledon organizers happy.
The clothes themselves are an element that reinforces the concept of retrofuturism, creating a tension between past and future through the inclusion of a futuristic wardrobe in an 80s context such as the squash court.
Looking forward to publishing his first book, due out in the fall and titled “Pools from Above,” Brad Walls defined “Vacant” as follows: “Geometry provides a hint at consistency in an ever inconsistent world. Innately, humans are drawn to it. Me, maybe more so”.

Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Squash | Collater.al
Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport
Photography
Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport
Brad Walls knows that squash is a geometric sport
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All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness

All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness

Tommaso Berra · 3 days ago · Photography

Hosted this week by All for the Gram is not just a serial profile but an actual archive that collects details of an aesthetic that, however decayed, still holds great appeal. Soviet Innerness is a journey into Soviet design through the interiors of abandoned houses, amid torn wallpaper and cold, chipped tiles.

The wallpaper has been replaced in some cases by newspaper pages bearing news and photos from the 1980s, the peeling walls look like a layering of now-faded colors, as do the flower designs that once probably appeared more colorful.
The walls of Soviet Innerness are full of tired geometries, blocks of color and forms that always give the idea of unfinished, or of something that ended too quickly, leaving time for cracks to make everything look so beautiful and decadent.

The project curated by Elena Amabili and Alessandro Calvaresi describes the aesthetics of the Eastern Bloc and the themes that were present throughout the houses. There are illustrations on the walls of the countryside in USSR space, but also the great industrialization of communist cities and the memory of Misha, the popular mascot of the 1980 Moscow Olympics.

All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness
Photography
All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness
All for the Gram – Soviet Innerness
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Giulia Degasperi’s tale of pastoralism in Trentino

Giulia Degasperi’s tale of pastoralism in Trentino

Tommaso Berra · 4 days ago · Photography

In summer, whole herds of cattle move from the valleys to the mountain meadows, thousands of feet above sea level, where the air is thinner and the rhythms are dictated only by nature’s needs. Along with the animals travel shepherds, who in the mountain pastures become part of a single cycle of life, which does not suffer pauses but flows slowly and steadily.
Giulia Degasperi has represented this age-old practice of the mountains of Trentino, without directly showing the beauty of the landscapes but that of work, effort and tradition. The series “These Dark Mountains” is an anthropological study that describes the abandonment of small mountain towns and the difficulty of preserving habits that have always linked man and nature.
The choice to shoot in black and white makes the photographs almost timeless. One cannot frame a historical period because everything has remained the same, from the places to the shepherds’ clothes.

You can support the publication of a volume dedicated to the work of photographer Giulia Degasperi through the fundraiser launched by SelfSelf, click here to find out how you can help make this photography project a reality.

Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi | Collater.al
Giulia Degasperi’s tale of pastoralism in Trentino
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Giulia Degasperi’s tale of pastoralism in Trentino
Giulia Degasperi’s tale of pastoralism in Trentino
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A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon

A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon

Tommaso Berra · 1 week ago · Photography

A world without “when I was your age it was different,” without “the youth of today are worthless,” a world in which therefore there is no “adultsplanning” and children seem to be able to do everything in total autonomy.
This is the landscape depicted in photography by Julie Blackmon, an American artist associated with family issues and small-town life.
The shots are social satire disguised within everyday scenes in which children are the real protagonists, not to say the only ones. All the details depicted are symbolic, as is the arrangement of the subjects, inspired by scenes painted by 17th-century Flemish painters.
Julie Blackmon’s goal is to represent the context of small American communities, tracing the dreams promoted by the American model.

One characteristic of Julie Blackmon’s children is their total detachment from anything related to contemporary technology. Thus they can be found playing “like in the old days,” painting the driveway with chalk, or in the handcrafted swimming pool in their own backyard.
Of inspiration for the photographer’s vision is the context of large families, being herself the eldest of nine siblings. In doing so she traces memories and what more generally influences childhood, made up of landscapes and elements that shape the way we think even as adults, those that Julie does not want to represent, deliberately leaving the feeling of a world in which everything is disconnected.

A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon
Photography
A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon
A world without adults in the photos of Julie Blackmon
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