Design Hiroshi Sugimoto changes the San Francisco skyline
Designarchitecturedesign

Hiroshi Sugimoto changes the San Francisco skyline

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Giorgia Massari
Hiroshi Sugimoto San Francisco | Collater.al

The San Francisco skyline gets a new peak. It is not a new skyscraper, however, but a work of art. A thin point, appearing like a pin, stretches towards infinity. It is the work of Japanese artist and photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto entitled ‘Point of Infinity‘. The stainless steel work is about 69 feets high and stands on a hill on the island of Yerba Buena. Crossing the Golden Gate then, and observing the city from Oakland, it will be possible to see the new work of art with a “magical” effect. The point seems to disappear into the sky, “I would like to make it go all the way to infinity, but it is technically impossible,” says the artist, who nonetheless succeeds in his intent thanks to the thin size of the point, which measures less than one inch in diameter. The reflective effect of the stainless steel also contributes to the chameleon-like effect with the sky, which incorporates the point in its colouring.

Hiroshi Sugimoto San Francisco | Collater.al
Ph. Credits Jessica Chou for New York Times
Hiroshi Sugimoto San Francisco | Collater.al
Ph. Credits Jessica Chou for New York Times

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s work marks the transformation of Yerba Buena Island and its adjacent “sister” Treasure Island, naval bases for more than fifty years (until 1997) and now destined to become a cultural centre thanks to the Treasure Island Art Program. The programme in fact aims at the cultural and artistic redevelopment of the islands, designing green spaces that will host different types of public art. From the plans it would appear that this will be the world’s largest new public art park. But that is not all. In fact, the two islands will also house a residential and commercial centre, leading to the complete reutilisation of the area, for which reclamation was necessary. Needless to say, this huge and ambitious project requires a huge effort in terms of economics as well as labour. It is estimated that more than $1.5 billion will be spent, but it will bring new jobs and new homes for more than 8,000 people. In this sense, it is interesting to point out that art becomes a vehicle to attract tourism and thus create an economic movement of the two islands.

Treasure Island San Francisco Art Museum
Render of the future public art park of Tresaure Island (ph. TIDA)
Treasure Island San Francisco Art Museum
Render of the future public art park of Tresaure Island (ph. TIDA)
Designarchitecturedesign
Written by Giorgia Massari
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