La musique électronique, five questions to Fhin

La musique électronique, five questions to Fhin

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 month ago · Music

In France, they would say “Là c’est la cerise sur le gâteau“, a common expression that in English is literally translate with “the icing on the cake.”. Undoubtedly this is how the music of the young French artist Fhin, a rising star of electronic music, is identified.

Author-composer, performer and producer of his songs, Fhin proposes music that mixes neo-soul, progressive/alternative and electronic influences. This syncretism, tinged with a romantic touch and hypnotic grooves, is an invitation to dream, a cardinal notion in the conception of his repertoire. Trauma is Fhin’s first album and collects songs that are to date his most personal, a reflection of his history and his universe.

We asked Fhin 5 questions to get to know him better, to get to know his “traumas” and delve into his very personal world.

The word ‘trauma’, at least in Italian has a precise meaning, can you explain us something more about its origins and the birth of your upcoming album?Traumas are generally seen and felt as conclusions of really bad events. I think it is also a powerful thing to understand, accept and dominate to learn to live with.It is a print in each one of us, it forges personality and makes you who you are. Trauma is something you didn’t died from, it is a proof that life is precious and fragile.For the first time in that album, I wrote a lot about my childhood, mostly on a time during which I was hospitalized to remove a tumour in my spine and lung. It was not something terrible to live, I was young and naive, but i’m conscious about the luck I had to be able to walk again and everything. I often think about those memories and it will always be there somewhere in my mind.

I’m sure you could see it coming, but being Italian I must ask, is there an Italian artist of the past or present that you particularly like or that you would like to work with? 
The first Italian artist I heard and blew my mind it was Giovanni Giorgio, with his amazing soundtrack for Midnight express. He also made an awesome work on Random Access Memories. Legend!

You come from a family of musicians who play different instruments, from your mother who plays the piano very well, to your grandparents who were pianists and an opera singers on one of the biggest transatlantic liners in France, how did you approach electronic music that seems so far from the influences you received? 
Actually I’ve never learned music theory, my parents are crazy about music but didn’t put me in classes etc. I was on drums really young, and learned guitar, piano, by trying to reproduce what I was listening to. Then electronic music came naturally as I wanted to record on my computer, and was listening to a lot of new styles of music on blogs etc.

Where does the stage name Fhin come from? Why did you choose it?
I just liked how it sounded and was written. The first Idea came from Pink Floyd’s “Thin Ice”. And it approximately means the same thing in french and english when you say it, so.. voilà ! 

To conclude, it’s been a long time since your last album, what can we expect? What are your feelings?
With this one, I absolutely didn’t bother about the way I should make music so this person likes it, and this one will like it…  I didn’t want to release a corporate album with a single musical signature, one mood, like a lot of albums that are released. I think it is a heritage of old ways to produce music, when we were hiring musicians to build the album, one sound engineer, one studio. Everything on the album was then sounding a bit the same. Now we can do absolutely anything we want with an audio interface and a laptop, I think it is boring to stick to one mood/genre. So everything you will here comes straight from my heart, and there are a lot of different vibes!

La musique électronique, five questions to Fhin
Music
La musique électronique, five questions to Fhin
La musique électronique, five questions to Fhin
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Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Art

It was February 16, 1990, when one of the most influential and emblematic contemporary artists died prematurely, ripped from life by AIDS. This year, on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of Keith Haring‘s death, the BBC has produced a film that retraces the artist’s story. 

Titled Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the film recounts in just under an hour and a half some of the most emblematic episodes and encounters in Haring’s life. The works are interwoven with images, interviews with Keith himself and unpublished footage from the archives of the Haring Foundation and made available to the BBC. 

Through the artist’s life is also told the New York of the 80s and 90s, the art and creativity that exploded at every corner, but also AIDS and fear. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy is directed by Ben Anthony and was broadcast for the first time on the BBC Two channel on July 4th, but you can watch it again on the BBC streaming site, iPlayer

This fascinating and compelling film – told using previously unheard interviews with Haring, which form the narrative of the documentary – is the definitive story of the artist in his own words. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
Art
Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
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“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 month ago · Art

Inspired by the great couple Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Leon Keer, one of the most important artists in the world of anamorphic street art, has recently created “Safe House”.

His latest work presents a gift box in trompe l’oeil on the tympanum of a building.
“It is not obvious for everyone to have a roof over their head, your home is precious and gives you comfort and protection, a gift for the necessary needs of life.”

“Safe House” is a packaged house, artfully crafted with a great optical illusion is a tribute to Christo and Jeanne-Claude, it was made for MX29 Graffiti Tour 2020 organized by Ateliers du Graff.
The Dutch artist wants us to reflect on the importance of having a roof over our heads, something that we very often take for granted, but which, as he says, is fundamental.

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Art
“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Giulia Pacciardi · 4 weeks ago · Art

In the heart of Trastevere, more precisely in Via delle Fratte di Trastevere, on the corner of Via dei Fienaroli, the Roman neighborhood where Ennio Morricone was born and grew up, a new mural dedicated to him stands out since yesterday.
It is the work of the prolific street artist Harry Greb, who is no stranger to this type of tribute. Over the years, in fact, he has titled walls to leading Italian figures of our times such as Alberto Sordi, Anna Magnani and Rino Gaetano.

In Greb’s vision, Morricone looks fixedly at us through his glasses, with a luminous crown resting on his head, the Academy Honorary Award in his left hand and his right hand busy mimicking the gesture of silence.

The opera dedicated to the Roman composer appeared yesterday afternoon, just a few hours after his death which shook the hearts of most.

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
Art
Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

Among the most famous and fascinating artistic techniques, the ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi undoubtedly stands out. It is a practice born from the idea of transforming an imperfection, a damage or a wound into something even more beautiful and perfect. Basically, this technique consists in repairing ceramic objects, even those of daily use such as cups and plates, using gold or cast silver to weld the shards. The final result gives the object a unique look and, what is no small thing, a much higher value than the original. It is precisely from the art of Kintsugi that the artist Glen Martin Taylor was inspired for his works. 

Like the Japanese, Glen Martin Taylor repairs ceramics of all kinds, some made by him and others bought but replacing precious metal with everyday objects, from twine threads to metal elements. 

If in Kintsugi’s art the only important part is that of repair, for the artist the act of reassembling objects is as important as that of destroying them. Through these two phases, the artist frees his emotions and confronts them by creating objects that will eventually have lost their primary purpose, but not their importance. 

Discover all the works by Glen Martin Taylor on his Instagram profile

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
Art
Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
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